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1. Devine EB, Alfonso-Cristancho R, Devlin A, Edwards TC, Farrokhi ET, Kessler L, Lavallee DC, Patrick DL, Sullivan SD, Tarczy-Hornoch P, Yanez ND, Flum DR, CERTAIN Collaborative: A model for incorporating patient and stakeholder voices in a learning health care network: Washington State's Comparative Effectiveness Research Translation Network. J Clin Epidemiol; 2013 Aug;66(8 Suppl):S122-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A model for incorporating patient and stakeholder voices in a learning health care network: Washington State's Comparative Effectiveness Research Translation Network.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the inaugural comparative effectiveness research (CER) cohort study of Washington State's Comparative Effectiveness Research Translation Network (CERTAIN), which compares invasive with noninvasive treatments for peripheral artery disease, and to focus on the patient centeredness of this cohort study by describing it within the context of a newly published conceptual framework for patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR).
  • STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: The peripheral artery disease study was selected because of clinician-identified uncertainty in treatment selection and differences in desired outcomes between patients and clinicians.
  • Patient centeredness is achieved through the "Patient Voices Project," a CERTAIN initiative through which patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments are administered for research and clinical purposes, and a study-specific patient advisory group where patients are meaningfully engaged throughout the life cycle of the study.
  • RESULTS: Primary outcomes are PRO instruments that measure function, health-related quality of life, and symptoms, the latter developed with input from the patients.
  • Input from the patient advisory group led to revised retention procedures, which now focus on short-term (3-6 months) follow-up.
  • The research advisory panel is piloting a point-of-care, patient assessment checklist, thereby returning study results to practice.
  • CONCLUSION: The CERTAIN's inaugural cohort study may serve as a useful model for conducting PCOR and creating a learning health care network.
  • [MeSH-major] Advisory Committees. Comparative Effectiveness Research / methods. Outcome Assessment (Health Care) / methods. Patient Participation / methods. Peripheral Arterial Disease / therapy. Translational Medical Research / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Cohort Studies. Data Collection. Humans. Intermittent Claudication / therapy. Models, Theoretical. Patient Satisfaction. Patient-Centered Care / organization & administration. Washington

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 23849146.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-5921
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 1 R01 HS 20025-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025014; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR000423; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1TR000423
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS540290; NLM/ PMC4097950
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Comparative effectiveness research / Patient-centered outcomes research / Patient-reported outcomes / Peripheral artery disease / Research infrastructure / Stakeholders
  • [Investigator] Clowes A; Alexander F; Meissner M; Van Eaton E; Yetisgen-Yildiz YY; Armstrong C; Berman M; Boland R; Capurro D; Grant R; Hativa M; Johansen M; Johnson S; Klamp W; Lawrence S; Lloyd A; Machinchick E; Mallahan S; Nickel K; Osman R; Pagoaga C; Patel K; Salazar R; Gaston Symons R; Tepper M; Tran T; Yantsides C; Zadworny M; Farrokhi E
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2. Davidson KW, Bigger JT, Burg MM, Carney RM, Chaplin WF, Czajkowski S, Dornelas E, Duer-Hefele J, Frasure-Smith N, Freedland KE, Haas DC, Jaffe AS, Ladapo JA, Lespérance F, Medina V, Newman JD, Osorio GA, Parsons F, Schwartz JE, Shaffer JA, Shapiro PA, Sheps DS, Vaccarino V, Whang W, Ye S: Centralized, stepped, patient preference-based treatment for patients with post-acute coronary syndrome depression: CODIACS vanguard randomized controlled trial. JAMA Intern Med; 2013 Jun 10;173(11):997-1004
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  • [Title] Centralized, stepped, patient preference-based treatment for patients with post-acute coronary syndrome depression: CODIACS vanguard randomized controlled trial.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of providing post-ACS depression care on depressive symptoms and health care costs.
  • SETTING: Patients were recruited from 2 private and 5 academic ambulatory centers across the United States.
  • PARTICIPANTS: A total of 150 patients with elevated depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] score ≥10) 2 to 6 months after an ACS, recruited between March 18, 2010, and January 9, 2012.
  • INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to 6 months of centralized depression care (patient preference for problem-solving treatment given via telephone or the Internet, pharmacotherapy, both, or neither), stepped every 6 to 8 weeks (active treatment group; n = 73), or to locally determined depression care after physician notification about the patient's depressive symptoms (usual care group; n = 77).
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in depressive symptoms during 6 months and total health care costs.
  • RESULTS: Depressive symptoms decreased significantly more in the active treatment group than in the usual care group (differential change between groups, -3.5 BDI points; 95% CI, -6.1 to -0.7; P = .01).
  • Although mental health care estimated costs were higher for active treatment than for usual care, overall health care estimated costs were not significantly different (difference adjusting for confounding, -$325; 95% CI, -$2639 to $1989; P = .78).
  • CONCLUSIONS: For patients with post-ACS depression, active treatment had a substantial beneficial effect on depressive symptoms.
  • This kind of depression care is feasible, effective, and may be cost-neutral within 6 months; therefore, it should be tested in a large phase 3 pragmatic trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Depression / economics. Depression / therapy. Patient Preference

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  • (PMID = 23471421.001).
  • [ISSN] 2168-6114
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA Intern Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT01032018
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 5RC2HL101663; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-088117; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-84034; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / K24 HL084034; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL088117; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL114924; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / RC2 HL101663; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR000040; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1TR000040
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS463638; NLM/ PMC3681929
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3. Sunaert P, Bastiaens H, Nobels F, Feyen L, Verbeke G, Vermeire E, De Maeseneer J, Willems S, De Sutter A: Effectiveness of the introduction of a Chronic Care Model-based program for type 2 diabetes in Belgium. BMC Health Serv Res; 2010;10:207
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  • [Title] Effectiveness of the introduction of a Chronic Care Model-based program for type 2 diabetes in Belgium.
  • BACKGROUND: During a four-year action research project (2003-2007), a program targeting all type 2 diabetes patients was implemented in a well-defined geographical region in Belgium.
  • The implementation of the program resulted in an increase of the overall Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) score from 1.45 in 2003 to 5.5 in 2007.
  • The aim of the follow-up study in 2008 was to assess the effect of the implementation of Chronic Care Model (CCM) elements on the quality of diabetes care in a country where the efforts to adapt primary care to a more chronic care oriented system are still at a starting point.
  • METHODS: A quasi-experimental study design involving a control region with comparable geographical and socio-economic characteristics and health care facilities was used to evaluate the effect of the intervention in the region.
  • RESULTS: In total 4,174 type 2 diabetes patients were selected from the research database; 2,425 patients (52.9% women) with a mean age of 67.5 from the intervention region and 1,749 patients (55.7% women) with a mean age of 67.4 from the control region.
  • In 2006 only 26% of the patients had their urine tested for micro-albuminuria and only 36% had consulted an ophthalmologist.
  • CONCLUSION: Although the overall ACIC score increased from 1.45 to 5.5, the improvement in the quality of diabetes care was moderate.
  • Further improvements are needed in the CCM components delivery system design and clinical information systems.
  • But it is clear that, simultaneously, action is needed on the health system level to realize the installation of an accurate quality monitoring system and the necessary preconditions for chronic care delivery in primary care (patient registration, staff support, IT support).
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Belgium. Cohort Studies. Databases, Factual. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Quality Indicators, Health Care


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4. Higginson IJ, Simon ST, Benalia H, Downing J, Daveson BA, Harding R, Bausewein C, PRISMA: Which questions of two commonly used multidimensional palliative care patient reported outcome measures are most useful? Results from the European and African PRISMA survey. BMJ Support Palliat Care; 2012 Mar;2(1):36-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Which questions of two commonly used multidimensional palliative care patient reported outcome measures are most useful? Results from the European and African PRISMA survey.
  • AIM: To evaluate the views of clinicians and researchers on their use of outcome measures and which questions are most important in palliative and end-of-life care.
  • METHODS: Online survey of professionals working in clinical care, clinical audit and research in palliative care across Europe and Africa identified through national and international associations and databases.
  • Questions focused on measures used, reasons and which questions were important in two commonly used multidimensional measures, the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS) and the Support Team Assessment Schedule (STAS).
  • The main uses were similar: assessing patients' symptoms/needs (88% and 85% of POS and STAS users, respectively), monitoring changes (62%, 58%), evaluating care (61%, 48%) and assessing family needs (59%, 60%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In palliative care, outcome measures often used in clinical practice are also often used in research.
  • Questions relating to pain, symptoms, emotional needs and family concerns are consistently considered the most useful and important in palliative patient reported outcome measures (PROMs).
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Cross-Cultural Comparison. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Palliative Care. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 24653497.001).
  • [ISSN] 2045-4368
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ supportive & palliative care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ Support Palliat Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Investigator] Albers G; Antunes B; Bennett E; Barros Pinto A; Bausewein C; Bechinger-English D; Benalia H; Bradley L; Ceulemans L; Daveson BA; Deliens L; Derycke N; de Vlieger M; Dillen L; Downing J; Echteld M; Evans N; Faksvåg Haugen D; Gikaara N; Gomes B; Gysels M; Hall S; Harding R; Higginson IJ; Kaasa S; Koffman J; Ferreira PL; Menten J; Monteiro Calanzani N; Murtagh F; Onwuteaka-Philipsen B; Pasman R; Pettenati F; Pool R; Powell T; Ribbe M; Sigurdardottir K; Simon S; Toscani F; van den Eynden B; van der Steen J; Vanden Berghe P; van Iersel T
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6. Kuzma AM, Meli Y, Meldrum C, Jellen P, Butler-Lebair M, Koczen-Doyle D, Rising P, Stavrolakes K, Brogan F: Multidisciplinary care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Proc Am Thorac Soc; 2008 May 1;5(4):567-71
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  • [Title] Multidisciplinary care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed.
  • This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care.
  • The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support.
  • This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment.
  • Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel.
  • [MeSH-major] Delivery of Health Care, Integrated. Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living. Advance Directives. Disability Evaluation. Humans. Nutritional Support. Oxygen Inhalation Therapy. Patient Care Planning. Patient Education as Topic. Social Support. Travel

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  • (PMID = 18453373.001).
  • [ISSN] 1546-3222
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc Am Thorac Soc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76101; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76102; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76103; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76104; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76105; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76106; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76107; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76108; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76109; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76110; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76111; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76112; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76113; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76114; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76115; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76116; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76118; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HR / N01HR76119
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 39
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2645337
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7. Amouretti M, Czernichow P, Kerjean A, Hochain P, Nousbaum JB, Rudelli A, Zerbib F, Dupas JL, Gouérou H, Herman H, Colin R: [Management of upper digestive hemorrhage occurring in the community: patterns of patient care in 4 French administrative areas]. Gastroenterol Clin Biol; 2000 Nov;24(11):1003-11
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  • [Title] [Management of upper digestive hemorrhage occurring in the community: patterns of patient care in 4 French administrative areas].
  • [Transliterated title] Prise en charge des hémorragies digestives hautes communautaires. Trajectoires des malades dans 4 départements français.
  • AIMS: To describe patterns of health care management in patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and to identify factors linked to the different patterns.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of patients over 18 with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (inpatients excluded) among all public hospitals and private practice gastroenterologists in 4 French administrative areas (3 in Northern France and one in the South West).
  • RESULTS: One thousand six hundred and two patients were included over a six-month period (1996).
  • An endoscopic procedure was performed in 1532 patients in public (70%) or private (20.5%) hospitals, or at private office (9.5%).
  • Hospitalization was necessary in 78.8% of the patients in university, non university public or private hospitals (38.9, 45.5 and 15.6%, respectively) with a median duration of 6.5 days.
  • Endoscopic hemostasis was performed in 21.4% of the patients, more often in university and no university public hospitals.
  • Surgery was necessary in 4% of the patients.
  • Patients' characteristics did not differ between the 4 areas.
  • On the other hand, health care supply provided in the management of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage was different in the four French geographical areas.
  • CONCLUSION: a) An initial endoscopic procedure is nearly always performed in patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in France; in 1 patient out of 10, endoscopy was performed in a private gastroenterologist office;.
  • c) the geographical variations observed in referral patterns depend in part on health care supply;.
  • d) upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage status could be used as an indicator of the quality of health care organizations.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Blood Transfusion. Data Collection. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Delivery of Health Care. Endoscopy, Digestive System. France. Health Services Accessibility. Humans. Length of Stay. Middle Aged. Patient Care. Prospective Studies. Quality of Health Care. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11139667.001).
  • [ISSN] 0399-8320
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroentérologie clinique et biologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterol. Clin. Biol.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
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8. Opekun AR, Gotschall AB, Abdalla N, Agent C, Torres E, Sutton FM, Graham DY, Tsuchiya K: Improved infrared spectrophotometer for point-of-care patient 13C-urea breath testing in the primary care setting. Clin Biochem; 2005 Aug;38(8):731-4
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  • [Title] Improved infrared spectrophotometer for point-of-care patient 13C-urea breath testing in the primary care setting.
  • The 13C-urea breath test provides non-invasive testing for Helicobacter pylori infection with the possibility of analysis at the point of care.
  • Point of care tests require accurate and efficient desktop instrumentation.
  • [MeSH-major] Breath Tests / instrumentation. Point-of-Care Systems. Spectrophotometry, Infrared / instrumentation. Urea
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Carbon Isotopes. Female. Helicobacter Infections / diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Primary Health Care. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15963485.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-9120
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK56338
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carbon Isotopes; 8W8T17847W / Urea
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9. Koroloff N, Boots R, Lipman J, Thomas P, Rickard C, Coyer F: A randomised controlled study of the efficacy of hypromellose and Lacri-Lube combination versus polyethylene/Cling wrap to prevent corneal epithelial breakdown in the semiconscious intensive care patient. Intensive Care Med; 2004 Jun;30(6):1122-6
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  • [Title] A randomised controlled study of the efficacy of hypromellose and Lacri-Lube combination versus polyethylene/Cling wrap to prevent corneal epithelial breakdown in the semiconscious intensive care patient.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of two forms of eye care (hypromellose and Lacri-Lube combination vs polyethylene/Cling wrap covers) for intensive care patients.
  • PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS: One hundred ten patients with a reduced or absent blink reflex were followed through until they regained consciousness, were discharged from the facility during study enrolment, died or developed a positive corneal ulcer or eye infection.
  • INTERVENTIONS: All patients received standard eye cleansing every 2 h.
  • No patients had corneal ulceration in the polyethylene cover group, but 4 patients had corneal ulceration in the HL group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Polyethylene covers are as effective as HL in reducing the incidence of corneal damage in intensive care patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Australia / epidemiology. Chlorobutanol / therapeutic use. Drug Combinations. Female. Humans. Hypromellose Derivatives. Intensive Care Units. Lanolin / therapeutic use. Male. Methylcellulose / analogs & derivatives. Methylcellulose / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Mineral Oil / therapeutic use. Petrolatum / therapeutic use. Polyethylene. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • [CommentIn] Intensive Care Med. 2005 Feb;31(2):313 [15565358.001]
  • (PMID = 15014864.001).
  • [ISSN] 0342-4642
  • [Journal-full-title] Intensive care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intensive Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Ophthalmic Solutions; 3NXW29V3WO / Hypromellose Derivatives; 78200-24-5 / lacri-lube; 8006-54-0 / Lanolin; 8009-03-8 / Petrolatum; 8020-83-5 / Mineral Oil; 9002-88-4 / Polyethylene; 9004-67-5 / Methylcellulose; HM4YQM8WRC / Chlorobutanol
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11. Nusbaum MR, Frasier PY, Rojas F, Trotter K, Tudor G: Sexual orientation and sexual health care needs: a comparison of women beneficiaries in outpatient military health care settings. J Homosex; 2008;54(3):259-76
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  • [Title] Sexual orientation and sexual health care needs: a comparison of women beneficiaries in outpatient military health care settings.
  • A survey was mailed to women patients from two military outpatient settings, with 1,196 women responding.
  • Larger primary care patient-based studies of sexual health care needs of sexual minorities are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Ambulatory Care. Health Services Needs and Demand. Heterosexuality. Homosexuality, Female. Hospitals, Military. Military Personnel
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Demography. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Physician-Patient Relations. United States

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  • (PMID = 18825863.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-8369
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of homosexuality
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Homosex
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 5-D12-HP00055
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Vinicor F, Cohen SJ, Mazzuca SA, Moorman N, Wheeler M, Kuebler T, Swanson S, Ours P, Fineberg SE, Gordon EE, et al: DIABEDS: a randomized trial of the effects of physician and/or patient education on diabetes patient outcomes. J Chronic Dis; 1987;40(4):345-56
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  • [Title] DIABEDS: a randomized trial of the effects of physician and/or patient education on diabetes patient outcomes.
  • To examine the effects of intensive patient and/or physician diabetes education on patient health outcomes, a controlled trial was conducted in which internal medicine residents and their 532 diabetic patients were randomly assigned to: routine care; patient education; physician education; or both patient and physician education.
  • Patient outcome data were analyzed either by analysis of covariance on post intervention values (2-hour post-prandial plasma glucose [PPG]; body weight [BW]; blood pressure [BP]; or analysis of variance conducted on change values (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] and glycosylated hemoglobin [A1Hgb]).
  • After patient education, significant improvements were observed in FPG, A1Hgb, BW, and systolic and diastolic BP.
  • The combination of patient plus physician education resulted in the greatest improvements in patients' health outcomes including FPG, A1Hgb, PPG, BW and diastolic BP.
  • Thus, achieving optimal patient outcomes for a chronic disease like diabetes mellitus may require a greater or more effective use of resources than currently estimated.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus. Internal Medicine / education. Internship and Residency. Patient Education as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care). Random Allocation

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  • (PMID = 3549757.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9681
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of chronic diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chronic Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIADDK NIH HHS / AM / P60 AM20542
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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13. Ramamurthy S, Bhatti P, Munir F, Ng T, Applegate K, Tridandapani S: A novel technology for automatically obtaining digital facial photographs near-simultaneously with portable radiographs. J Digit Imaging; 2015 Jun;28(3):259-63
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  • Our objective is to design, implement, and phantom-test a device to automatically obtain point-of-care patient photographs along with portable radiographs.
  • Such photographs could help with detection of wrong-patient errors.
  • [MeSH-major] Face / radiography. Medical Errors / prevention & control. Patient Identification Systems. Photography. Point-of-Care Systems. Radiology Information Systems

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  • [Cites] Acad Radiol. 2005 Jan;12(1):97-103 [15691730.001]
  • [Cites] AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2013 Apr;200(4):W345-52 [23521477.001]
  • [Cites] J Digit Imaging. 2013 Oct;26(5):875-85 [23408010.001]
  • [Cites] Acad Radiol. 2014 Aug;21(8):1038-47 [25018076.001]
  • (PMID = 25447418.001).
  • [ISSN] 1618-727X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of digital imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Digit Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / K23EB013221; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / KL TR000455; United States / PHS HHS / / KL2 RF025009; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1RR025008; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1TR000454
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4441700 [Available on 06/01/16]
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14. Swain MA, Steckel SB: Influencing adherence among hypertensives. Res Nurs Health; 1981 Mar;4(1):213-22
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  • In a 3 x 4 repeated measures analysis of variance design, 115 patients were randomly selected and randomly assigned to one of three treatment modalities (routine clinic care, patient education, and contingency contracting) and were followed over four clinic visits.
  • Patient education was not effective in lowering blood pressures; it produced an untoward outcome, a dropout rate higher than that for patients receiving only routine clinic care.
  • However, contingency contracting was an effective intervention strategy for improving patient knowledge, F (1,59) = 51.32, p less than .0001; adherence to requests for regular medical care, Max L (2) = 25.9, p less than .0001; and decreasing diastolic blood pressures, F (2,49) = 3.39, p less than .05.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension / therapy. Patient Compliance
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Blood Pressure. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Outpatient Clinics, Hospital / utilization. Patient Dropouts. Patient Education as Topic. Random Allocation

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  • (PMID = 6908098.001).
  • [ISSN] 0160-6891
  • [Journal-full-title] Research in nursing & health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Res Nurs Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 17045
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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15. Palifka LA, Frasier LD, Metzger RR, Hedlund GL: Parenchymal Brain Laceration as a Predictor of Abusive Head Trauma. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2016 Jan;37(1):163-8
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  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Accurate differentiation of abusive head trauma and accidental head injury in infants and young children is critical and impacts clinical care, patient prognosis, forensic investigations, and medicolegal proceedings.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively identified 137 patients with abusive head trauma and 28 patients who incurred moderate to severe accidental brain injury.
  • RESULTS: Among the abusive head trauma cohort, parenchymal brain lacerations were identified in 18 patients, while none were identified in any patients with accidental injury.

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  • [Copyright] © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.
  • (PMID = 26471745.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-959X
  • [Journal-full-title] AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Pileggi DJ, Fugit A, Romanelli F, Winstead PS, Lawson A, Deep KS, Cook AM: Pharmacy residents' preparedness for the emotional challenges of patient care. Am J Health Syst Pharm; 2015 Sep 1;72(17):1475-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pharmacy residents' preparedness for the emotional challenges of patient care.
  • Both respondent groups provided perspectives on pharmacy residents' frequency of exposure to and preparedness for nine scenarios that could potentially be emotionally unsettling to pharmacy residents (e.g., a patient's death, participation in a response to a cardiorespiratory arrest).
  • Majorities of both RPDs and residents (85.2% and 67.1%, respectively) indicated that residents could be better prepared for the emotional challenges of patient care.
  • CONCLUSION: The majority of RPD and resident respondents indicated that residents could be better prepared for the emotional challenges of patient care.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 26294241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-2900
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of health-system pharmacy : AJHP : official journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Health Syst Pharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Abernethy AP, Zafar SY, Uronis H, Wheeler JL, Coan A, Rowe K, Shelby RA, Fowler R, Herndon JE 2nd: Validation of the Patient Care Monitor (Version 2.0): a review of system assessment instrument for cancer patients. J Pain Symptom Manage; 2010 Oct;40(4):545-58
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  • [Title] Validation of the Patient Care Monitor (Version 2.0): a review of system assessment instrument for cancer patients.
  • CONTEXT: The Patient Care Monitor (PCM) is a review of systems survey delivered by means of an electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePRO) data capture system that uses wireless tablet computers.
  • METHODS: Two hundred seventy-five individuals participated in three clinical trials enrolling breast (n=65), gastrointestinal (n=113), and lung (n=97) cancer patients.
  • Prior reports demonstrate patient satisfaction with PCM 2.0.
  • CONCLUSION: Within three unique academic oncology populations, PCM 2.0 is a valid ePRO instrument for assessing symptoms with seven patient-centered subscale or index domains.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Data Collection / instrumentation. Data Collection / methods. Fatigue / complications. Fatigue / diagnosis. Fatigue / physiopathology. Fatigue / psychology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Satisfaction. Quality of Life / psychology. Regression Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20579839.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-6513
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pain and symptom management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pain Symptom Manage
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Buysse DJ, Barzansky B, Dinges D, Hogan E, Hunt CE, Owens J, Rosekind M, Rosen R, Simon F, Veasey S, Wiest F: Sleep, fatigue, and medical training: setting an agenda for optimal learning and patient care. Sleep; 2003 Mar 15;26(2):218-25
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sleep, fatigue, and medical training: setting an agenda for optimal learning and patient care.
  • The difficult issues surrounding discussions of sleep, fatigue, and medical education stem from an ironic biologic truth: physicians share a common physiology with their patients, a physiology that includes an absolute need for sleep and endogenous circadian rhythms governing alertness and performance.
  • We cannot ignore the fact that patients become ill and require medical care at all times of the day and night, but we also cannot escape the fact that providing such care requires that medical professionals, including medical trainees, be awake and functioning at times that are in conflict with their endogenous sleep and circadian physiology.
  • Empiric research addressing the effects of sleep loss on patient safety, education outcomes, and resident health is urgently needed: equally important are the development and assessment of innovative countermeasures to maximize performance and learning.
  • By working together to address the problems of sleep and fatigue in its own trainees, the medical field can provide a valuable legacy to patients and to future generations of healthcare providers--a legacy or optimal medical education, healthy doctors, and healthy patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Education, Medical. Fatigue / complications. Learning. Patient Care. Sleep Wake Disorders / etiology. Teaching / methods

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  • (PMID = 12683483.001).
  • [ISSN] 0161-8105
  • [Journal-full-title] Sleep
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sleep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Congresses; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Hadji P, Klein S, Häussler B, Kless T, Linder R, Rowinski-Jablokow M, Verheyen F, Gothe H: The bone evaluation study (BEST): patient care and persistence to treatment of osteoporosis in Germany. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther; 2013 Nov;51(11):868-72
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  • [Title] The bone evaluation study (BEST): patient care and persistence to treatment of osteoporosis in Germany.
  • OBJECTIVE: Data on fracture frequency and medical care of patients with osteoporosis are still insufficient.
  • We assessed fractures, frequencies, and the number of multiple fractures per patient as well as time to follow-up fracture and drug persistence using Kaplan-Meier analysis.
  • RESULTS: Within the observation period, 27% of the osteoporosis patients sustained fractures; of those with fractures, 69% had multiple fractures.
  • For patients with multiple fractures, re-fracture rate after 360 days was between 69% for patients who received parathyroid hormone and 85% for patients who received no anti-osteoporotic medication 360 days before follow-up fracture.
  • In the patient population, persistence rates after 1 year were between 58% for parathyroid hormone and 2% for other osteoporosis-specific drugs (alfacalcidol, fluorides, nandrolone, calcitonin).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In Germany, the number of patients with osteoporosis-attributable fractures is high.
  • Low persistence lead to a relatively high proportion of patients with follow-up fractures.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Germany / epidemiology. Humans. Male. Medication Adherence. Middle Aged. Patient Care. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 24040854.001).
  • [ISSN] 0946-1965
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents
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20. Kohi MP, Fidelman N, Behr S, Taylor AG, Kolli K, Conrad M, Hwang G, Weinstein S: Periprocedural Patient Care. Radiographics; 2015 Oct;35(6):1766-78
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  • [Title] Periprocedural Patient Care.
  • Periprocedural care of patients who undergo image-guided interventions is a task of monumental importance.
  • As physicians who perform procedures, radiologists rely on their noninterpretive skills to optimize patient care.
  • At the center of periprocedural care is proper patient identification.
  • It is imperative to perform the indicated procedure for the correct patient.
  • It is also of great importance to discuss with the patient the nature of the procedure.
  • Once the patient agrees to the procedure and grants informed consent, it is imperative to stop and confirm that the correct procedure is being performed on the correct patient.
  • This universal time-out policy helps decrease errors and improves patient care.
  • To optimize our interpretative and procedural skills, it may be necessary to provide the patient with sedation or anesthesia.
  • However, it is important to understand the continuum of sedation and be able to appropriately monitor the patient and manage the sedation in these patients.
  • To minimize the risks of infection, periprocedural care of patients relies on aseptic or, at times, sterile techniques.
  • Before the procedure, it is important to evaluate the patient's coagulation parameters and bleeding risks and correct the coagulopathy, if needed.
  • During the procedure, the patient's blood pressure and at times the patient's glucose levels will also require monitoring and management.
  • After the procedure, patients must be observed in a recovery unit and deemed safe for discharge.
  • The fundamental components of periprocedural care necessary to enhance patient safety, satisfaction, and care are reviewed to familiarize the reader with the important noninterpretive skills necessary to optimize periprocedural care.

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  • [Copyright] © RSNA, 2015.
  • (PMID = 26466184.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-1323
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. De Georgia MA, Kaffashi F, Jacono FJ, Loparo KA: Information technology in critical care: review of monitoring and data acquisition systems for patient care and research. ScientificWorldJournal; 2015;2015:727694
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  • [Title] Information technology in critical care: review of monitoring and data acquisition systems for patient care and research.
  • There is a broad consensus that 21st century health care will require intensive use of information technology to acquire and analyze data and then manage and disseminate information extracted from the data.
  • No area is more data intensive than the intensive care unit.
  • While there have been major improvements in intensive care monitoring, the medical industry, for the most part, has not incorporated many of the advances in computer science, biomedical engineering, signal processing, and mathematics that many other industries have embraced.
  • Acquiring, synchronizing, integrating, and analyzing patient data remain frustratingly difficult because of incompatibilities among monitoring equipment, proprietary limitations from industry, and the absence of standard data formatting.
  • In this paper, we will review the history of computers in the intensive care unit along with commonly used monitoring and data acquisition systems, both those commercially available and those being developed for research purposes.
  • [MeSH-major] Critical Care / methods. Medical Informatics / methods. Monitoring, Physiologic / instrumentation. Monitoring, Physiologic / methods

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  • (PMID = 25734185.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-744X
  • [Journal-full-title] TheScientificWorldJournal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ScientificWorldJournal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4334936
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22. Wood M, Mayo F, Marsland D: A systems approach to patient care, curriculum, and research in family practice. J Med Educ; 1975 Dec;50(12 Pt1):1106-12
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  • [Title] A systems approach to patient care, curriculum, and research in family practice.
  • The system of data recording and retrieval which defines a family practice population of patients is described.
  • Depending on resources available, it is possible to record demographic and morbidity data from the patient populations of both teaching and nonteaching practices.
  • Data have been collected from a patient population of 88,000 in 26 practicing sites in Virginia, totaling 380,000 diagnostic and follow-up visits.
  • The costs of this recording process in nonteaching practices, the use of such data as an educational resource for the training of primary care physicians, and the evaluations of health care delivered are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Curriculum. Family Practice / education. Patient Care Planning. Systems Analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Delivery of Health Care. Internship and Residency. Primary Health Care. Research Design. Virginia

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  • (PMID = 1195325.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-2577
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical education
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Educ
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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23. McMorrow ML, Masanja MI, Kahigwa E, Abdulla SM, Kachur SP: Quality assurance of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in routine patient care in rural Tanzania. Am J Trop Med Hyg; 2010 Jan;82(1):151-5
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  • [Title] Quality assurance of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in routine patient care in rural Tanzania.
  • For quality assurance (QA), thick blood smears for reference microscopy were collected for 2 to 3 days per week from patients receiving RDTs; microscopy was not routinely performed at the health facilities.
  • Ten thousand six hundred fifty (10,650) patients were tested with RDTs, and 51.5% (5,488/10,650) had a positive test result.
  • Blood smear results were available for 3,914 patients, of whom 40.1% (1,577/3,914) were positive for P. falciparum malaria.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimalarials / therapeutic use. Malaria / diagnosis. Malaria / drug therapy. Quality Assurance, Health Care. Rural Population

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  • (PMID = 20065013.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-1645
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimalarials
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2803527
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24. Moshé SL: Sex and the substantia nigra: administration, teaching, patient care, and research. J Clin Neurophysiol; 1997 Nov;14(6):484-94
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  • [Title] Sex and the substantia nigra: administration, teaching, patient care, and research.

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  • (PMID = 9458054.001).
  • [ISSN] 0736-0258
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neurophysiology : official publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurophysiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / NS-20253
  • [Publication-type] Addresses; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GABA Agents; 0 / Gonadal Steroid Hormones; 0 / Steroids; 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone
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25. Flink M, Bergenbrant Glas S, Airosa F, Öhlén G, Barach P, Hansagi H, Brommels M, Olsson M: Patient-centered handovers between hospital and primary health care: an assessment of medical records. Int J Med Inform; 2015 May;84(5):355-62
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  • [Title] Patient-centered handovers between hospital and primary health care: an assessment of medical records.
  • BACKGROUND: Handovers between hospital and primary healthcare possess a risk for patient care.
  • It has been suggested that the exchange of a comprehensive medical record containing both medical and patient-centered aspects of information can support high quality handovers.
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore patient handovers between primary and secondary care by assessing the levels of patient-centeredness of medical records used for communication between care settings and by assessing continuity of patient care.
  • METHODS: Quantitative content analysis was used to analyze the 76 medical records of 22 Swedish patients with chronic diseases and/or polypharmacy.
  • RESULTS: The levels of patient-centeredness documented in handover records were assessed as poor, especially in regards to informing patients and achieving a shared understanding/agreement about their treatment plans.
  • The follow up of patients' medical and care needs were remotely related to the discharge information sent from the hospital to the primary care providers, or to the hospital provider's request for patient follow-up in primary healthcare.
  • CONCLUSION: The lack of patient-centered documentation either indicates poor patient-centeredness in the encounters or low priority given by the providers on documenting such information.
  • Based on this small study, discharge information sent to primary healthcare cannot be considered as a means of securing continuity of patient care.
  • Healthcare providers need to be aware that neither their discharge notes nor their referrals will guarantee continuity of patient care.
  • [MeSH-major] Documentation / statistics & numerical data. Electronic Health Records / statistics & numerical data. Hospitalization / statistics & numerical data. Patient Discharge Summaries / statistics & numerical data. Patient Handoff / statistics & numerical data. Primary Health Care / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Chronic Disease / epidemiology. Humans. Meaningful Use / statistics & numerical data. Patient-Centered Care / statistics & numerical data. Sweden / epidemiology. Transitional Care / statistics & numerical data

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 25661033.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8243
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of medical informatics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Med Inform
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Care transitions / Continuity of care / Medical record system / Patient-centered care
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26. Pugh MJ, Rosen AK, Montez-Rath M, Amuan ME, Fincke BG, Burk M, Bierman A, Cunningham F, Mortensen EM, Berlowitz DR: Potentially inappropriate prescribing for the elderly: effects of geriatric care at the patient and health care system level. Med Care; 2008 Feb;46(2):167-73
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  • [Title] Potentially inappropriate prescribing for the elderly: effects of geriatric care at the patient and health care system level.
  • BACKGROUND: Many studies have identified patient characteristics associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly (PIPE), however, little attention has been directed toward how health care system factors such as geriatric care may affect this patient safety issue.
  • OBJECTIVE: This study examines the association between geriatric care and PIPE in a community dwelling elderly population.
  • SUBJECTS: Veterans age > or =65 years who received health care in the VA system during Fiscal Years (FY99-00), and also received at medications from the Veterans Administration in FY00.
  • Geriatric care penetration was calculated as the proportion of patients within a facility who received at least 1 geriatric outpatient clinic or inpatient visit.
  • ANALYSES: Logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relationship between geriatric care and PIPE after controlling for patient and health care system characteristics.
  • RESULTS: Patients receiving geriatric care were less likely to have PIPE exposure (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.73).
  • There was also a weak effect for geriatric care penetration, with a trend for patients in low geriatric care penetration facilities having higher risk for PIPE regardless of individual geriatric care exposure (odds ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.30).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although geriatric care is associated with a lower risk of PIPE, additional research is needed to determine if heterogeneity in the organization and delivery of geriatric care resulted in the weak effect of geriatric care penetration, or whether this is a result of low power.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Therapy / standards. Drug Utilization Review. Geriatrics / standards. Health Services for the Aged / standards. Practice Patterns, Physicians' / statistics & numerical data. Quality of Health Care

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  • (PMID = 18219245.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7079
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Curtis BM, Ravani P, Malberti F, Kennett F, Taylor PA, Djurdjev O, Levin A: The short- and long-term impact of multi-disciplinary clinics in addition to standard nephrology care on patient outcomes. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2005 Jan;20(1):147-54
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  • [Title] The short- and long-term impact of multi-disciplinary clinics in addition to standard nephrology care on patient outcomes.
  • BACKGROUND: This two country case control study of incident dialysis patients evaluates the outcomes of patients exposed to formalized multi-disciplinary clinic (MDC) programmes vs standard nephrologist care.
  • METHODS: Patients commencing dialysis in two centres (Vancouver, Canada and Cremona, Italy) were evaluated at and after dialysis start, as a function of MDC exposure vs nephrologist care alone.
  • Only chronic kidney disease patients, with longer than 3 months of exposure to nephrology care, who had not previously received kidney replacement therapy were included.
  • The MDC was similar in both countries and average exposure was 6-8 h per patient-year, as compared to 2-4 h for standard care.
  • All patients had equal access to resources prior to dialysis and with respect to dialysis start, as all had been referred to the same local nephrology practices.
  • RESULTS: During the evaluation period 288 patients commenced dialysis after receiving more than 3 months nephrology care prior to dialysis.
  • Mean duration of nephrology care prior to dialysis was 42 months, and dialysis was initiated at similar low glomerular filtration rate (GFR), though statistically significantly different (7.0 and 8.4 ml/min/m2, P = 0.001).
  • The MDC patients had higher haemoglobin (102 vs 90 g/l, P<0.0001), albumin (37.0 vs 34.8 g/l, P = 0.002) and calcium levels (2.29 vs 2.16 mmol/l, P<0.0001) at dialysis start.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This analysis of outcomes in two different countries suggests that despite equal and long exposure to nephrology care prior to dialysis, there appears to be an association of survival advantage for those patients exposed to formalized clinic care in addition to standard nephrologist follow-up.
  • Thus, the data do suggest that knowledge of patient status at the time of dialysis start is important.
  • Further research is needed to determine which specific components of care both prior to dialysis and after its commencement are most important with respect to outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemodialysis Units, Hospital / utilization. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Nephrology / methods. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Patient Care Team. Referral and Consultation. Renal Dialysis / utilization

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  • [CommentIn] Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2005 Jan;20(1):10-2 [15632346.001]
  • (PMID = 15585514.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-0509
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Fernandez R, Pearce M, Grand JA, Rench TA, Jones KA, Chao GT, Kozlowski SW: Evaluation of a computer-based educational intervention to improve medical teamwork and performance during simulated patient resuscitations. Crit Care Med; 2013 Nov;41(11):2551-62
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  • [Title] Evaluation of a computer-based educational intervention to improve medical teamwork and performance during simulated patient resuscitations.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of a low-resource-demand, easily disseminated computer-based teamwork process training intervention on teamwork behaviors and patient care performance in code teams.
  • MEASUREMENTS: Teamwork behaviors and patient care behaviors were video recorded during high-fidelity simulated patient resuscitations and coded by trained raters blinded to condition assignment and study hypotheses.
  • Similarly, patient care items ("chest radiograph correctly interpreted"; "time to start of compressions") were standardized before combining to create overall patient care scores.
  • Subject matter expert reviews and pilot testing of scenario content, teamwork items, and patient care items provided evidence of content validity.
  • MAIN RESULTS: When controlling for team members' medically relevant experience, teams in the training condition demonstrated better teamwork (F [1, 42] = 4.81, p < 0.05; ηp = 10%) and patient care (F [1, 42] = 4.66, p < 0.05; ηp = 10%) than did teams in the placebo condition.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Computer-based team training positively impacts teamwork and patient care during simulated patient resuscitations.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation / education. Computer Simulation. Education, Medical, Undergraduate / methods. Patient Care Team

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  • (PMID = 23949473.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0293
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 1R18HS020295-01; United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / R18 HS020295
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Keeney S, Hasson F, McKenna H, Gillen P: Nurses', midwives' and patients' perceptions of trained health care assistants. J Adv Nurs; 2005 May;50(4):345-55
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  • [Title] Nurses', midwives' and patients' perceptions of trained health care assistants.
  • AIM: This paper reports on part of a larger study and outlines Registered Nurses' and Midwives' perceptions of, and satisfaction with, trained health care assistants in a regional hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland.
  • BACKGROUND: An increased reliance upon health care assistants in the clinical setting has highlighted the need to consider how staff and patients perceive the health care assistant role.
  • FINDINGS: Nurses were satisfied with the work undertaken by trained health care assistants and considered that they contributed positively to patient care and supported nurses/midwives by undertaking non-professional duties.
  • However, maternity clients reported that health care assistants were mostly giving direct care, and their availability was perceived to be better than that of qualified staff.
  • Some nurses/midwives were reluctant to assume responsibility for delegation of direct care duties to health care assistants.
  • CONCLUSION: The employment of health care assistants yields positive outcomes for staff and female clients but consideration must be given to role clarity.
  • Further research into how qualified staff perceive health care assistants is important as such perceptions influence delegation, integration, role development and acceptance of health care assistants.
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Interprofessional Relations. Ireland. Nursing Care / organization & administration. Nursing Care / psychology. Nursing, Supervisory. Workload

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  • (PMID = 15842441.001).
  • [ISSN] 0309-2402
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of advanced nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adv Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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30. Moore AD, Hamilton JB, Knafl GJ, Godley PA, Carpenter WR, Bensen JT, Mohler JL, Mishel M: The influence of mistrust, racism, religious participation, and access to care on patient satisfaction for African American men: the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project. J Natl Med Assoc; 2013;105(1):59-68
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  • [Title] The influence of mistrust, racism, religious participation, and access to care on patient satisfaction for African American men: the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to explore whether a particular combination of individual characteristics influences patient satisfaction with the health care system among a sample of African American men in North Carolina with prostate cancer.
  • Patient satisfaction may be relevant for improving African American men's use of regular care, thus improving the early detection of prostate cancer and attenuating racial disparities in prostate cancer outcomes.
  • METHODS: This descriptive correlation study examined relationships of individual characteristics that influence patient satisfaction using data from 505 African American men from North Carolina, who prospectively enrolled in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project from September 2004 to November 2007.
  • RESULTS: The variables selected for the final model were: participation in religious activities, mistrust, racism, and perceived access to care.
  • In this study, both cultural variables, mistrust (p=<.0001, F=95.58) and racism (p=<.002, F=5.59), were significantly negatively associated with patient satisfaction and accounted for the majority of the variability represented by individual characteristics.
  • CONCLUSION: Mistrust and racism are cultural factors that are extremely important and have been negatively associated with patient satisfaction and decreased desires to utilize health care services for African American men.
  • To overcome barriers in seeking health care services, health care providers need to implement a patient-centered approach by creating a clinical environment that demonstrates cultural competence and eliminating policies, procedures, processes, or personnel that foster mistrust and racism.
  • [MeSH-major] African Americans / ethnology. Culture. Health Services Accessibility / trends. Patient Satisfaction. Prostatic Neoplasms / ethnology. Racism

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  • (PMID = 23862297.001).
  • [ISSN] 1943-4693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Natl Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Ighani F, Kapoor KG, Gibran SK, Davis GH, Prager TC, Chuang AZ, Godley B: A comparison of two-way text versus conventional paging systems in an academic ophthalmology department. J Med Syst; 2010 Aug;34(4):677-84
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  • The goal of this study was to evaluate efficiency and impact on patient care delivery of a two-way text paging system compared to conventional one-way alphanumeric pagers.
  • In phase two, these participants used two-way text pagers without instruction (unstructured format) that they subsequently compared to the alphanumeric system with devised surveys assessing (on a scale of 0 to 100) time saved, increased daily efficiency, facilitation in patient care, and overall impression (helpfulness).In phase three, participants used a specific communication prioritization protocol (structured format) with the two-way text pagers with subsequent comparison and assessment with the same surveys.
  • Compared to traditional alphanumeric pagers, new digital two-way text pagers were found to be statistically (p < 0.0001) more helpful by participants in all categories: as a time saver (80.33 vs. 56.95) p < 0.0001, increased daily efficiency (78.15 vs. 57.13) p < 0.0001, facilitation in patient care (78.79 vs. 56.95) p < 0.0001, and overall impression (helpfulness) (61.82 vs. 84.33) p < 0.0001.
  • When compared to the alphanumeric pager, the two-way text pager was found to decrease subjectively call backs (73.6% to 45.6%, p < 0.0001), reduce interruptions of learning activities (43.63% to 26.6%, p < 0.0001) and enabled better patient care (59.8% to 42.2%, p < 0.0001).
  • Two-way text paging is an effective alternative to alphanumeric paging, demonstrating saved time, increased daily efficiency, reduced call backs and interruptions of educational activities, and facilitation in patient care.

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  • (PMID = 20703922.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-5598
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical systems
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY10608
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Azari S, Sehaty F, Ebrahimi H: Satisfaction of women from cesarean section care services in public and private hospitals of Tabriz. Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res; 2013 Nov;18(6):435-8
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  • [Title] Satisfaction of women from cesarean section care services in public and private hospitals of Tabriz.
  • BACKGROUND: Consumer satisfaction is recognized as an important parameter for assessing the quality of patient care services.
  • The analysis of data showed significant difference between mothers' satisfaction with all aspects of care in the public and private hospitals (P < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: The results showed that mothers were more satisfied of physical and comfortable aspects, but informational aspect of care in both kinds of hospitals was low and there is a need for promote aspect.

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  • (PMID = 24554939.001).
  • [ISSN] 1735-9066
  • [Journal-full-title] Iranian journal of nursing and midwifery research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3917124
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Care / cesarean section delivery / patient satisfaction
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33. Cooper D, Farmery K, Johnson M, Harper C, Clarke FL, Holton P, Wilson S, Rayson P, Bence H: Changing personnel behavior to promote quality care practices in an intensive care unit. Ther Clin Risk Manag; 2005 Dec;1(4):321-32
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  • [Title] Changing personnel behavior to promote quality care practices in an intensive care unit.
  • The delivery of safe high quality patient care is a major issue in clinical settings.
  • Measurement focused on quality care behaviors (ie, documentation, charting, hand washing).
  • The results demonstrate the efficacy of a staff-led behavioral management approach for improving quality-care practices.

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  • (PMID = 18360574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1176-6336
  • [Journal-full-title] Therapeutics and clinical risk management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ther Clin Risk Manag
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1661635
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34. Gany F, Thiel de Bocanegra H: Maternal-child immigrant health training: changing knowledge and attitudes to improve health care delivery. Patient Educ Couns; 1996 Jan;27(1):23-31
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  • [Title] Maternal-child immigrant health training: changing knowledge and attitudes to improve health care delivery.
  • This paper reports the development, implementation and evaluation of a training program for all levels of staff of Maternity Infant Care Family Planning Centers in New York City.
  • It provides epidemiological and patient management skills for serving ethnically diverse populations and focuses on skills training, such as the cross-linguistic, cross-cultural interview, and using epidemiological principles in diagnosis and treatment.
  • This training has been very successful in enhancing health care providers' sensitivity toward immigrant health issues.
  • Patient care has been greatly improved.
  • [MeSH-major] Emigration and Immigration. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Health Personnel / education. Inservice Training / organization & administration. Maternal-Child Health Centers / standards. Quality Assurance, Health Care

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  • (PMID = 8788746.001).
  • [ISSN] 0738-3991
  • [Journal-full-title] Patient education and counseling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Patient Educ Couns
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] IRELAND
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35. Linder JA, Rose AF, Palchuk MB, Chang F, Schnipper JL, Chan JC, Middleton B: Decision support for acute problems: the role of the standardized patient in usability testing. J Biomed Inform; 2006 Dec;39(6):648-55
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  • [Title] Decision support for acute problems: the role of the standardized patient in usability testing.
  • For applications that require clinician use while interacting with patients, usability testing with standardized patients has the potential to approximate actual patient care in a controlled setting.
  • We used hypothetical scenarios and a standardized patient to collect quantitative and qualitative results in testing an early prototype of a new application, the Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Smart Form.
  • The standardized patient fit well into the usability testing sessions.
  • Clinicians had a positive response to the standardized patients and behaved as they normally would during a clinical encounter.
  • Based on these results, we are modifying the ARI Smart Form in preparation for use in actual patient care.
  • Standardized patients should be considered for usability testing, especially if an application is to be used during the patient interview.

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  • (PMID = 16442853.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0480
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomedical informatics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Biomed Inform
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL072806; United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / HS014420; United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / HS014563; United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / HS015169
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Leffert LR, Clancy CR, Bateman BT, Cox M, Schulte PJ, Smith EE, Fonarow GC, Schwamm LH, Kuklina EV, George MG: Patient Characteristics and Outcomes After Hemorrhagic Stroke in Pregnancy. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes; 2015 Oct;8(6 Suppl 3):S170-8
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  • [Title] Patient Characteristics and Outcomes After Hemorrhagic Stroke in Pregnancy.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Using medical history or International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes, we identified 330 pregnant and 10 562 nonpregnant female patients aged 18 to 44 years with HS in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke (2008-2014).
  • Differences in patient and care characteristics were compared by χ(2) or Fisher exact test (categorical variables) or Wilcoxon rank-sum (continuous variables) tests.
  • Conditional logistic regression assessed the association of pregnancy with outcomes conditional on categorical age and further adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics.
  • Pregnant versus nonpregnant HS patients were younger with fewer pre-existing stroke risk factors and medications.
  • Pregnant versus nonpregnant subarachnoid hemorrhage patients were less impaired at arrival, and less than half met blood pressure criteria for severe preeclampsia.
  • In-hospital mortality was lower in pregnant versus nonpregnant HS patients: adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for subarachnoid hemorrhage 0.17 (0.06-0.45) and intracerebral hemorrhage 0.57 (0.34-0.94).
  • Pregnant subarachnoid hemorrhage patients also had a higher likelihood of home discharge (2.60 [1.67-4.06]) and independent ambulation at discharge (2.40 [1.56-3.70]).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant HS patients are younger and have fewer risk factors than their nonpregnant counterparts, and risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality is lower.
  • Our findings suggest possible differences in underlying disease pathophysiology and challenges to identifying at-risk patients.

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  • [Copyright] © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
  • (PMID = 26515206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-7705
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation. Cardiovascular quality and outcomes
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; epidemiology / hemorrhage / pre-eclampsia / pregnancy / stroke
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37. Juillière Y, Jourdain P, Roncalli J, Trochu JN, Gravoueille E, Guibert H, Lambert H, Neau S, Spinazze L, Tallec N, Bachèlerie C, Beauvais F, Ertzinger C, Jondeau G, Groupe de travail Insuffisance cardiaque et cardiomyopathies, Société française de cardiologie: [Therapeutic education for cardiac failure patients: the I-care programme]. Arch Mal Coeur Vaiss; 2005 Apr;98(4):300-7
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  • [Title] [Therapeutic education for cardiac failure patients: the I-care programme].
  • [Transliterated title] Education thérapeutique des patients insuffisants cardiaques: le programme I-care.
  • The I-CARE programme consists of an evaluation of the role of therapeutic education in France, creating standardised tools and setting up training sessions for therapeutic education in the context of cardiac failure.
  • The I-CARE programme should allow the expansion of therapeutic education for cardiac failure and improve the multidisciplinary management of this disease which increasingly affects often elderly subjects.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure. Patient Education as Topic. Physician-Patient Relations


38. Hawkins BS, Prior MJ, Fisher MR, Blackhurst DW: Relationship between rate of patient enrollment and quality of clinical center performance in two multicenter trials in ophthalmology. Control Clin Trials; 1990 Oct;11(5):374-94
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  • [Title] Relationship between rate of patient enrollment and quality of clinical center performance in two multicenter trials in ophthalmology.
  • Those responsible for managing and overseeing multicenter clinical trials often express concern that differential rates of patients enrollment among participating clinical centers may be reflected in poorer compliance with study protocols or poorer patient care in the centers enrolling fewer patients.
  • The purposes of the present investigation were (1) to determine whether rate of patient enrollment was related to other measures of clinical center performance in two multicenter clinical trials in ophthalmology, the Macular Photocoagulation Study (MPS) and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), and (2) to compare findings from these two studies with findings reported from cooperative oncology groups.
  • Percent of major data forms ever failing computerized edit was the only measure of performance examined that demonstrated a strong positive relationship to rate of patient enrollment in both studies under both analytic approaches employed (F test for linear trend in means and Spearman's rank correlation).
  • In the MPS, but not in the ETDRS, percent of patients who had missed all visits scheduled during the past 12 months (inactive patients) also was related to rate of patient enrollment.
  • However, the major finding from this investigation has been that it is not possible to predict overall performance of an individual clinical center based on rate of patient enrollment.
  • Clinical centers enrolling fewer patients in these multicenter clinical trials performed in some areas as well as or better than centers enrolling larger numbers of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Macular Degeneration / surgery. Multicenter Studies as Topic / standards. Quality of Health Care / statistics & numerical data. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Diabetic Retinopathy / surgery. Humans. Laser Therapy. Light Coagulation. Patient Participation / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 1963130.001).
  • [ISSN] 0197-2456
  • [Journal-full-title] Controlled clinical trials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Control Clin Trials
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY1765; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY2548; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY2549; etc
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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39. Schlesinger M, Dorwart RA, Epstein SS: Managed care constraints on psychiatrists' hospital practices: bargaining power and professional autonomy. Am J Psychiatry; 1996 Feb;153(2):256-60
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  • [Title] Managed care constraints on psychiatrists' hospital practices: bargaining power and professional autonomy.
  • OBJECTIVE: The increasing involvement of insurers and hospitals in monitoring patient care is encroaching on the psychiatrist's autonomy in making clinical decisions.
  • They were questioned about whether the hospital or insurers had pressured them to change their inpatient practices or had attempted to discourage admission of certain types of patients.
  • RESULTS: More than three quarters of those surveyed reported pressure from insurers for early discharge; nearly two-thirds said hospitals limited length of stay; and about half had been discouraged from admitting severely ill patients, the uninsured, or Medicaid recipients.
  • Severely ill patients and those with little or no insurance are more likely than others to be affected by these limits on psychiatrists' autonomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hospitalization. Managed Care Programs. Mental Disorders / therapy. Psychiatry / organization & administration

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Psychiatry. 1997 Mar;154(3):443 [9054810.001]
  • (PMID = 8561208.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-953X
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH-01177; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH-40316
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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40. Deléger L, Grouin C, Zweigenbaum P: Extracting medical information from narrative patient records: the case of medication-related information. J Am Med Inform Assoc; 2010 Sep-Oct;17(5):555-8
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  • [Title] Extracting medical information from narrative patient records: the case of medication-related information.
  • OBJECTIVE: While essential for patient care, information related to medication is often written as free text in clinical records and, therefore, difficult to use in computerized systems.

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  • (PMID = 20819863.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-974X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Med Inform Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NLM NIH HHS / LM / U54LM008748
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Pharmaceutical Preparations
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2995678
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41. Landis JR, Williams DA, Lucia MS, Clauw DJ, Naliboff BD, Robinson NA, van Bokhoven A, Sutcliffe S, Schaeffer AJ, Rodriguez LV, Mayer EA, Lai HH, Krieger JN, Kreder KJ, Afari N, Andriole GL, Bradley CS, Griffith JW, Klumpp DJ, Hong BA, Lutgendorf SK, Buchwald D, Yang CC, Mackey S, Pontari MA, Hanno P, Kusek JW, Mullins C, Clemens JQ, MAPP Research Network Study Group: The MAPP research network: design, patient characterization and operations. BMC Urol; 2014;14:58
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  • [Title] The MAPP research network: design, patient characterization and operations.
  • BACKGROUND: The "Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain" (MAPP) Research Network was established by the NIDDK to better understand the pathophysiology of urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS), to inform future clinical trials and improve clinical care.
  • Findings are expected to provide significant advances in understanding UCPPS pathophysiology that will ultimately inform future clinical trials and lead to improvements in patient care.

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  • (PMID = 25085119.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2490
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT01098279
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK082315; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK082316; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK082342; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK082345; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82315; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82316; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82325; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82333; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82342; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82344; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82345; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK82370; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR001082
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Observational Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4126395
  • [Investigator] Clemens J; Hanno P; Kirkali Z; Kusek JW; Landis J; Lucia M; Mullins C; Pontari MA; Klumpp DJ; Schaeffer AJ; Apkarian AV; Cella D; Farmer MA; Fitzgerald C; Gershon R; Griffith JW; Heckman CJ 2nd; Jiang M; Keefer L; Marko DS; Michniewicz J; Parrish T; Tu F; Mayer A; Rodríguez LV; Alger J; Ashe-McNalley CP; Ellingson B; Heendeniya N; Kilpatrick L; Kutch J; Labus JS; Naliboff BD; Randal F; Smith SR; Kreder KJ; Bradley CS; Eno M; Greiner K; Luo Y; Lutgendorf SK; O'Donnell MA; Ziegler B; Clauw DJ; Clemens J; As-Sanie S; Berry S; Halvorson ME; Harris R; Harte S; Ichesco E; Oldendorf A; Scott KA; Williams DA; Buchwald D; Afari N; Krieger J; Miller J; Richey S; Ross SO; Spiro R; Sundsvold TJ; Strachan E; Yang CC; Andriole GL; Lai H; Bristol RL; Colditz G; Deutsch G; Gardner VC; Gereau RW 4th; Henderson JP; Hong BA; Hooton TM; Ness TJ; North CS; Spitznagle TM; Sutcliffe S; Landis J; Barrell T; Hanno P; Hou X; Howard T; Pontari MA; Robinson N; Stephens A; Wang Y; Lucia M; van Bokhoven A; Osypuk AA; Dayton R Jr; Jonscher KR; Sullivan HT; Wilson R; Moses MA; Briscoe AC; Briscoe D; Curatolo A; Froehlich J; Lee RS; Sachdev M; Solomon KR; Steen H; Mackey S; Bagarinao E; Foster LC; Hubbard E; Johnson KA; Martucci KT; McCue RL; Moericke RR; Nilakantan A; Noor N; Nickel J; Ehrlich GD; Mullins C; Kusek JW; Kirkali Z; Bavendam TG
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42. Weiner SJ, Schwartz A, Weaver F, Goldberg J, Yudkowsky R, Sharma G, Binns-Calvey A, Preyss B, Schapira MM, Persell SD, Jacobs E, Abrams RI: Contextual errors and failures in individualizing patient care: a multicenter study. Ann Intern Med; 2010 Jul 20;153(2):69-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Contextual errors and failures in individualizing patient care: a multicenter study.
  • BACKGROUND: A contextual error occurs when a physician overlooks elements of a patient's environment or behavior that are essential to planning appropriate care.
  • In contrast to biomedical errors, which are not patient-specific, contextual errors represent a failure to individualize care.
  • DESIGN: An incomplete randomized block design in which unannounced, standardized patients visited 111 internal medicine attending physicians between April 2007 and April 2009 and presented variants of 4 scenarios.
  • In all scenarios, patients presented both a contextual and a biomedical red flag.
  • SETTING: 14 practices, including 2 academic clinics, 2 community-based primary care networks with multiple sites, a core safety net provider, and 3 U.S.
  • Probing for contextual or biomedical information in response to red flags was usually necessary but not sufficient for an error-free plan of care.
  • Physicians provided error-free care in 73% of the uncomplicated encounters, 38% of the biomedically complicated encounters, 22% of the contextually complicated encounters, and 9% of the combined biomedically and contextually complicated encounters.
  • The study assessed physicians' propensity to make errors when every encounter provided an opportunity to do so and did not measure actual error rates that occur in primary care settings because of inattention to context.
  • CONCLUSION: Inattention to contextual information, such as a patient's transportation needs, economic situation, or caretaker responsibilities, can lead to contextual error, which is not currently measured in assessments of physician performance.
  • [MeSH-major] Decision Making. Internal Medicine / standards. Medical Errors / prevention & control. Medical History Taking / standards. Patient-Centered Care / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care). Patient Simulation

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jul 20;153(2):126-7 [20643993.001]
  • [CommentIn] Ann Intern Med. 2010 Nov 2;153(9):619-20; author reply 620 [21041586.001]
  • [CommentIn] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2010;154:A2955 [21176261.001]
  • (PMID = 20643988.001).
  • [ISSN] 1539-3704
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Johnson JK, Barach P, Vernooij-Dassen M, HANDOVER Research Collaborative: Conducting a multicentre and multinational qualitative study on patient transitions. BMJ Qual Saf; 2012 Dec;21 Suppl 1:i22-8
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  • [Title] Conducting a multicentre and multinational qualitative study on patient transitions.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe the approach we used during the HANDOVER Project to develop a multicentre, multinational research project for studying transitions of patient care while creating a community of practice for the researchers.
  • [MeSH-major] International Cooperation. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Patient Handoff / standards. Qualitative Research. Quality Assurance, Health Care

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  • (PMID = 23100548.001).
  • [ISSN] 2044-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ quality & safety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ Qual Saf
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Investigator] Venneri F; Molisso A; Albolino S; Toccafondi G; Gademan P; Göbel B; Kalkman C; Pijnenborg L; Wollersheim H; Hesselink G; Schoonhoven L; Zegers M; Boshuizen E; Drachsler H; Kicken W; van der Klink M; Stoyanov S; Kutryba B; Dudzik-Urbaniak E; Kalinowski M; Kutaj-Wasikowska H; Suñol R; Groene O; Orrego C; Öhlén G; Airosa F; Bergenbrant S; Flink M; Hansagi H; Olsson M; Lilford R; Chen Y; Novielli N; Manaseki-Holland S
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44. Apers S, Kovacs AH, Luyckx K, Alday L, Berghammer M, Budts W, Callus E, Caruana M, Chidambarathanu S, Cook SC, Dellborg M, Enomoto J, Eriksen K, Fernandes SM, Jackson JL, Johansson B, Khairy P, Kutty S, Menahem S, Rempel G, Sluman MA, Soufi A, Thomet C, Veldtman G, Wang JK, White K, Moons P, APPROACH-IS consortium, International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD): Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study (APPROACH-IS): rationale, design, and methods. Int J Cardiol; 2015 Jan 20;179:334-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study (APPROACH-IS): rationale, design, and methods.
  • BACKGROUND: Data on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are inconsistent and vary across the world.
  • The APPROACH-IS consortium (Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study) was created for this purpose and investigates PROs in adults with CHD worldwide.
  • DISCUSSION: APPROACH-IS represents a global effort to increase research understanding and capacity in the field of CHD, and will have major implications for patient care.
  • Results will generate valuable information for developing interventions to optimize patients' health and well-being.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 25464481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1874-1754
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT02150603
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adult / Congenital / Heart defects / International cooperation / Methods / Patient-reported outcomes
  • [Investigator] Alday L; Maisuls H; Cabrera M; Menahem S; Eaton S; Larion R; FengWang Q; Budts W; Van Deyk K; Apers S; Goossens E; Rassart J; Luyckx K; Moons P; Rempel G; Mackie A; Ballantyne R; Rankin K; Norris C; Taylor D; Vondermuhll I; Windram J; Heggie P; Lasiuk G; Khairy P; Proietti A; Dore A; Mercier LA; Mongeon FP; Marcotte F; Ibrahim R; Mondésert B; Côté MC; Kovacs A; Oechslin E; Bandyopadhyay M; Soufi A; Di Filippo S; Sassolas F; Bozio A; Chidambarathanu S; Farzana F; Lakshmi N; Callus E; Quadri E; Chessa M; Campioni G; Giamberti A; Enomoto J; Mizuno Y; Caruana M; Grech V; Vella S; Mifsud A; Borg N; Chircop D; Balbi MM; Critien RV; Farrugia J; Gatt Y; Muscat D; Eriksen K; Estensen ME; Dellborg M; Berghammer M; Mattson E; Strandberg A; Karlström-Hallberg P; Johansson B; Kronhamn AK; Schwerzman M; Thomet C; Huber M; Wang JK; Lu CW; Yang HL; Hua YC; Mulder B; Sluman M; Post M; Pieper E; Peels K; Waskowsky M; Veldtman G; Faust M; Lozier C; Reed C; Hilfer J; Daniels C; Jackson J; Kutty S; Chamberlain C; Cook S; Hindes M; Cedars A; White K; Jewish B; Rompfh A; Fernandes S; MacMillen K
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45. May F, Simpson D, Hart L, Rowett D, Perrier D: Experience with academic detailing services for quality improvement in primary care practice. Qual Saf Health Care; 2009 Jun;18(3):225-31
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Experience with academic detailing services for quality improvement in primary care practice.
  • BACKGROUND: Despite longstanding experimental evidence about effectiveness of academic detailing, transitioning this research-based concept into acceptable primary care quality improvement services has been slow in the USA.
  • The purpose of this study was to describe primary care uptake, retention and response to an academic-detailing-led service in the USA.
  • METHODS: Over a 29-month period, an academic-detailing-led drug and therapeutics information service was offered to all primary care physicians providing ongoing patient care in Fayette County, Kentucky.
  • RESULTS: 102 of 130 (78%) eligible primary care physicians participated in the service, 72% receiving visits for the type 2 diabetes management programme, and 58% the chronic non-malignant pain programme.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ongoing primary care quality improvement services spearheaded by academic detailing can be acceptable to US primary care physicians in practice.
  • [MeSH-major] Education, Medical, Continuing. Primary Health Care / standards. Quality of Health Care

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  • (PMID = 19468007.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-3901
  • [Journal-full-title] Quality & safety in health care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Qual Saf Health Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 02054; United States / PHS HHS / / E11/CCE421825-01; United States / PHS HHS / / R01 C100188-01.
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
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46. Harris MF, Jayasinghe UW, Chan BC, Proudfoot J, Crookes P, Zwar N, Powell Davies G, Team-link Research Team: Patient and practice characteristics predict the frequency of general practice multidisciplinary referrals of patients with chronic diseases: a multilevel study. Health Policy; 2011 Jul;101(2):140-5
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  • [Title] Patient and practice characteristics predict the frequency of general practice multidisciplinary referrals of patients with chronic diseases: a multilevel study.
  • OBJECTIVES: Chronic diseases require a multidisciplinary approach to provide optimal patient care in general practice.
  • This study explored the patient and practice factors associated with referral of patients with diabetes, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or hypertension to external allied health providers (AHPs).
  • The frequency of patient-reported referral to AHPs 6-months post-intervention was measured against patient and practice characteristics assessed by patients and practice staff questionnaires.
  • FINDINGS: Seven per cent of the total variance in the referrals was due to differences between practices and 93% attributed to differences between patients.
  • Previous referral, age over 45 years, multiple conditions, longer illness duration, poor mental and physical health were associated with the likelihood of referral to AHPs but not socio-economic status, patient self-assessment of care and the intervention.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Referral to multidisciplinary care for patients with long term conditions was appropriately linked to the complexity, duration and impact of these conditions.
  • [MeSH-major] Chronic Disease. General Practice / organization & administration. Interdisciplinary Communication. Patients / statistics & numerical data. Referral and Consultation / utilization

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21126795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-6054
  • [Journal-full-title] Health policy (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Policy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Investigator] Anderson T; Boyden A; Flack J; Harris E; Lillioja S; Perkins D; Athukorlalage T; Chong J; Christl B; Cooper S; Daniel C; Frances M; Kirby S; Fanaian M; Marshall L; Noorbergen D; Wan Q
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47. Campbell H, Duke T, Weber M, English M, Carai S, Tamburlini G, Pediatric Hospital Improvement Group: Global initiatives for improving hospital care for children: state of the art and future prospects. Pediatrics; 2008 Apr;121(4):e984-92
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  • [Title] Global initiatives for improving hospital care for children: state of the art and future prospects.
  • Deficiencies in the quality of health care are major limiting factors to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health.
  • Quality of patient care in hospitals is firmly on the agendas of Western countries but has been slower to gain traction in developing countries, despite evidence that there is substantial scope for improvement, that hospitals have a major role in child survival, and that inequities in quality may be as important as inequities in access.
  • There is now substantial global experience of strategies and interventions that improve the quality of care for children in hospitals with limited resources.
  • The World Health Organization has developed a toolkit that contains adaptable instruments, including a framework for quality improvement, evidence-based clinical guidelines in the form of the Pocket Book of Hospital Care for Children, teaching material, assessment, and mortality audit tools.
  • This article describes how many countries are achieving improvements in quality of pediatric care, despite limited resources and other major obstacles, and how the evidence has progressed in recent years from documenting the nature and scope of the problems to describing the effectiveness of innovative interventions.
  • [MeSH-major] Child Health Services / organization & administration. Child Health Services / trends. Child Welfare / trends. Delivery of Health Care / standards. Global Health. Quality of Health Care / organization & administration. Quality of Health Care / trends
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child Care / standards. Child Care / trends. Child, Hospitalized. Child, Preschool. Female. Forecasting. Health Planning / organization & administration. Health Services Research. Hospitals, Pediatric / standards. Humans. Infant. Male. World Health Organization

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  • (PMID = 18381526.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / / 076827
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 33
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2655645; NLM/ UKMS4149
  • [Investigator] Duke T; La Vincente S; Subhi RE; Alam MN; Hoque DM; Islam S; Patrich LT; Sophal U; Rathmony H; Gebrehiwot T; Enarson P; Hansmann A; Kanwal SK; Nurhamzah W; Luwiharsih; Koamesah IT; Chely G; Fernandez SM; Widowati K; Diah M; Mulati E; Sidik NA; Tamburlini G; Lazzerini M; Ntoburi S; English M; Molyneux E; Schulpen TW; Nuñez O; Keshishian E; Nasi T; Auto J; Malek E; Mphelekedzeni M; Stephen C; Patrick M; Reyburn H; Kalokola F; Winter L; Sarmento DA; Moniz BF; Alves E; Alves Lda C; Bridson J; Campbell H; Davies K; Kinoti S; Campbell P; Dinh TP; Kumar H; Roespandi H; Bucens I; von Xylander S; Mbewe AL; Kuttumuratova A; Malhotra S; Trias M; Carai S; Lambrechts T; Martines JC; Scherpbier RW; Weber MW
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48. Boissy P, Corriveau H, Michaud F, Labonté D, Royer MP: A qualitative study of in-home robotic telepresence for home care of community-living elderly subjects. J Telemed Telecare; 2007;13(2):79-84
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  • [Title] A qualitative study of in-home robotic telepresence for home care of community-living elderly subjects.
  • The first comprised six healthcare professionals involved in geriatric care and the second comprised six elderly people with disabilities living in the community.
  • The concept of an in-home telepresence robot was illustrated using a photograph of a mobile robot, and participants were then asked to suggest potential health care applications.
  • Teleoperated mobile robotic systems in the home were thought to be useful in assisting multidisciplinary patient care through improved communication between patients and healthcare professionals, and offering respite and support to caregivers under certain conditions.
  • The shift from a traditional hospital-centred model of care in geriatrics to a home-based model creates opportunities for using telepresence with mobile robotic systems in home telecare.
  • [MeSH-major] Delivery of Health Care / methods. Health Services for the Aged. Home Care Services. Needs Assessment. Robotics


49. Manojlovich M, Saint S, Forman J, Fletcher CE, Keith R, Krein S: Developing and testing a tool to measure nurse/physician communication in the intensive care unit. J Patient Saf; 2011 Jun;7(2):80-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Developing and testing a tool to measure nurse/physician communication in the intensive care unit.
  • OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study, conducted in 3 intensive care units (ICUs) at 1 Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, was to develop tools and procedures to measure nurse/physician communication in future studies.
  • Qualitative data came from 4 observations of patient care rounds and 8 interviews with nurses and physicians.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Intensive Care Units / organization & administration. Interdisciplinary Communication. Physician-Nurse Relations. Safety / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Feasibility Studies. Health Care Surveys. Humans. Interviews as Topic. Observation. Research Design. Statistics as Topic / methods. Statistics as Topic / standards

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  • (PMID = 21537199.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-8425
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of patient safety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Patient Saf
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Rizza A, Kaplan V, Senn O, Rosemann T, Bhend H, Tandjung R, FIRE study group: Age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity in primary care: the Swiss FIRE project. BMC Fam Pract; 2012;13:113
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  • [Title] Age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity in primary care: the Swiss FIRE project.
  • BACKGROUND: General practitioners often care for patients with several concurrent chronic medical conditions (multimorbidity).
  • Recent data suggest that multimorbidity might be observed more often than isolated diseases in primary care.
  • We explored the age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity and compared these estimates to the prevalence estimates of other common specific diseases found in Swiss primary care.
  • METHODS: We analyzed data from the Swiss FIRE (Family Medicine ICPC Research using Electronic Medical Record) project database, representing a total of 509,656 primary care encounters in 98,152 adult patients between January 1, 2009 and July 31, 2011.
  • For each encounter, medical problems were encoded using the second version of the International Classification of primary Care (ICPC-2).
  • We defined chronic health conditions using 147 pre-specified ICPC-2 codes and defined multimorbidity as 1) two or more chronic health conditions from different ICPC-2 rubrics, 2) two or more chronic health conditions from different ICPC-2 chapters, and 3) two or more medical specialties involved in patient care.
  • We compared the prevalence estimates of multimorbidity defined by the three methodologies with the prevalence estimates of common diseases encountered in primary care.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In primary care, prevalence estimates of multimorbidity are higher than those of isolated diseases.
  • Among the elderly, more than one out of three patients suffer from multimorbidity.
  • Management of multimorbidity is a principal concern in this vulnerable patient population.
  • [MeSH-major] Chronic Disease / epidemiology. Comorbidity. Primary Health Care / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 23181753.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2296
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC family practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Fam Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3557138
  • [Investigator] Battegay E; Bhend H; Klaus D; Rosemann T; Zoller M; Beriger J; Bertschi R; Braun B; Bruno A; Büchi M; Bürki HU; Bugmann I; Cadisch R; Chmiel C; Duner P; Frei M; Frey C; Frey J; Gibreil MA; Günthard M; Haller D; Hanselmann M; Horschick D; Huber F; Hufschmid P; Joos B; Klaus D; Koch S; Köstner B; Kuster B; Kuster H; Lauffer G; Leibundgut H; Luchsinger P; Lüscher S; Maier Ch; Marti Ch; Martin J; Messerli W; Morger T; Navarro V; Neuwirth A; Rizzi J; Schindelek F; Schlatter G; Somaini P; Stäger J; Staehelin A; Steinegger A; Steurer-Stey C; Suter O; Truong TP; Vecellio M; Violi A; von Allmen R; Waeckerlin HJ; Weber F; Weber J; Widler J; Zimmerman R; Busato A
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51. Scura G, Davidoff F: Case-related use of the medical literature. Clinical librarian services for improving patient care. JAMA; 1981 Jan 2;245(1):50-2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Case-related use of the medical literature. Clinical librarian services for improving patient care.
  • Patient management was affected in 20% of cases, and diagnostic thinking was influenced in an even higher percentage of instances.
  • Since the information generated by such searches may often result in further cost savings to patients, the potential overall efficiency of such services may be great.

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  • (PMID = 6776305.001).
  • [ISSN] 0098-7484
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NLM NIH HHS / LM / LM 02295; United States / NLM NIH HHS / LM / LM 02903
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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52. Pollock NR, Rolland JP, Kumar S, Beattie PD, Jain S, Noubary F, Wong VL, Pohlmann RA, Ryan US, Whitesides GM: A paper-based multiplexed transaminase test for low-cost, point-of-care liver function testing. Sci Transl Med; 2012 Sep 19;4(152):152ra129
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  • [Title] A paper-based multiplexed transaminase test for low-cost, point-of-care liver function testing.
  • In developed nations, monitoring for drug-induced liver injury through serial measurements of serum transaminases [aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT)] in at-risk individuals is the standard of care.
  • Despite the need, monitoring for drug-related hepatotoxicity in resource-limited settings is often limited by expense and logistics, even for patients at highest risk.
  • These data suggest that the ultimate point-of-care fingerstick device will have high impact on patient care in low-resource settings.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Function Tests / economics. Liver Function Tests / methods. Paper. Point-of-Care Systems / economics. Transaminases / blood. Transaminases / economics

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  • (PMID = 22993296.001).
  • [ISSN] 1946-6242
  • [Journal-full-title] Science translational medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sci Transl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 5 K23 AI074638-04; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / K23 AI074638
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.6.1.- / Transaminases; EC 2.6.1.1 / Aspartate Aminotransferases; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS453551; NLM/ PMC3624093
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53. Linder LA, Christian BJ: Characteristics of the nighttime hospital bedside care environment (sound, light, and temperature) for children with cancer. Cancer Nurs; 2011 May-Jun;34(3):176-84
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  • [Title] Characteristics of the nighttime hospital bedside care environment (sound, light, and temperature) for children with cancer.
  • The intensities of sound and light levels required to perform necessary patient care may result in a disruptive nighttime care environment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Study findings identified a bedside care environment with persistently elevated sound levels and abrupt increases in sound intensity throughout the night.
  • Collaborative efforts to organize clinical care to minimize nighttime disruptions may lead to reduced bedside sound levels.

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  • [Copyright] © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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  • (PMID = 21522058.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-9804
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / F31 NR010175; United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / F31 NR010175-01A1; United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / F31 NR010175-02; United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / F31NR010175-01
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS252968; NLM/ PMC3085834
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54. Hernández Fernandez de Rojas D, Ibañez E, Longhurst H, Maurer M, Fabien V, Aberer W, Bouillet L, Zanichelli A, Caballero T, IOS Study Group: Treatment of HAE Attacks in the Icatibant Outcome Survey: An Analysis of Icatibant Self-Administration versus Administration by Health Care Professionals. Int Arch Allergy Immunol; 2015;167(1):21-8
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  • [Title] Treatment of HAE Attacks in the Icatibant Outcome Survey: An Analysis of Icatibant Self-Administration versus Administration by Health Care Professionals.
  • BACKGROUND: Icatibant, a selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of acute hereditary angio-oedema (HAE) attacks in adults, can be administered by health care professionals (HCPs) or self-administered.
  • RESULTS: Icatibant was used in 652 attacks in 170 patients with HAE type I/II.
  • Patients self-administered icatibant for attacks of all severities; overall, 34.7% of severe and 30.2% of very severe attacks were HCP treated.
  • Patients successfully self-administered icatibant for a wide variety of HAE attacks, demonstrating that icatibant is generally well tolerated and effective for self-administration.
  • Self-administration of icatibant provides a complementary option to HCP administration, enabling optimization of patient care.

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  • [Copyright] © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 26112099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0097
  • [Journal-full-title] International archives of allergy and immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT01034969
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Observational Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Bradykinin B2 Receptor Antagonists; 7PG89G35Q7 / icatibant; S8TIM42R2W / Bradykinin
  • [Investigator] Aberer W; Bygum A; Blanchard Delauny C; Boccon-Gibod I; Bouillet L; Fain O; Gompel A; Jeandel PY; Kanny G; Launay D; Maillard H; Martin L; Olivier Y; Baş M; Bork K; Maurer M; Psarros F; Graif Y; Toubi E; Arcoleo F; Bova M; Marone G; Montinaro V; Zanichelli A; Baeza ML; Caballero T; Guilarte M; Hernandez Fernández de Rojas D; Hernando de Larramendi C; Lleonart R; Marques L; Bjoerkander J; Helbert M; Longhurst H; Wiednig M; Coppere B; Guez S; Masseau A; Arnolds J; Cicardi M; Cillari E; Zito A; Caminoa M; Ibáñez E; Lobera T; López Serrano MC; Sala A; Lorenzo L
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55. Lee EK, Yuan F, Hirsh DA, Mallory MD, Simon HK: A clinical decision tool for predicting patient care characteristics: patients returning within 72 hours in the emergency department. AMIA Annu Symp Proc; 2012;2012:495-504
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  • [Title] A clinical decision tool for predicting patient care characteristics: patients returning within 72 hours in the emergency department.
  • The primary purpose of this study was to develop a clinical tool capable of identifying discriminatory characteristics that can predict patients who will return within 72 hours to the Pediatric emergency department (PED).
  • We studied 66,861 patients who were discharged from the EDs during the period from May 1 2009 to December 31 2009.
  • We used a classification model to predict return visits based on factors extracted from patient demographic information, chief complaint, diagnosis, treatment, and hospital real-time ED statistics census.
  • The analysis involves using a subset of the patient cohort for training and establishment of the predictive rule, and blind predicting the return of the remaining patients.
  • Among the predictive rules, the most frequent discriminatory factors identified include diagnosis (> 97%), patient complaint (>97%), and provider type (> 57%).
  • For Level 1 patients, critical readmission factors include patient complaint (>57%), time when the patient arrived until he/she got an ED bed (> 64%), and type/number of providers (>50%).
  • For Level 4/5 patients, physician diagnosis (100%), patient complaint (99%), disposition type when patient arrives and leaves the ED (>30%), and if patient has lab test (>33%) appear to be significant.
  • The model was demonstrated to be consistent and predictive across multiple PED sites.The resulting tool could enable ED staff and administrators to use patient specific values for each of a small number of discriminatory factors, and in return receive a prediction as to whether the patient will return to the ED within 72 hours.
  • This provides an opportunity for improving care and offering additional care or guidance to reduce ED readmission.
  • [MeSH-major] Decision Support Techniques. Emergency Service, Hospital / organization & administration. Patient Readmission

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  • (PMID = 23304321.001).
  • [ISSN] 1942-597X
  • [Journal-full-title] AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AMIA Annu Symp Proc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3540516
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56. Cohen DL, McCullough LB, Kessel RW, Apostolides AY, Alden ER, Heiderich KJ: Informed consent policies governing medical students' interactions with patients. J Med Educ; 1987 Oct;62(10):789-98
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Informed consent policies governing medical students' interactions with patients.
  • When medical students become involved in patient care, concerns are raised that have ethical and possibly legal implications.
  • In order to determine compliance with the guidelines of the U.S. government and the Joint Committee on Accreditation of Hospitals pertaining to informed consent, the authors conducted a study of hospital administrators, medical school department chairpersons, and medical school deans (with response rates ranging from 82.3 to 95.1 percent) concerning policies on student involvement in patient care.
  • The results show that only 37.5 percent of all responding teaching hospitals specifically informed patients that students would be involved in care.
  • Only 51 percent of the responding medical schools that specifically gave their students instruction or guidance on initial patient interaction as a matter of policy insisted that their students introduce themselves as students and clarify their role in patient care.
  • [MeSH-major] Disclosure. Ethics, Medical. Hospitals, Teaching / standards. Informed Consent. Patient Advocacy. Students, Medical
  • [MeSH-minor] Federal Government. Government Regulation. Humans. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Patient Rights. United States

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  • (PMID = 3477644.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-2577
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical education
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Educ
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 25463
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Empirical Approach / Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals / Professional Patient Relationship
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: informed consent; KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: patient care; KIE/ Full author name: Cohen, Daniel L; KIE/ Full author name: McCullough, Laurence B; KIE/ Full author name: Kessel, RWI; KIE/ Full author name: Apostolides, Aristide Y; KIE/ Full author name: Alden, Errol R; KIE/ Full author name: Heiderich, Kelly J
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57. Lefrant JY, Garrigues B, Pribil C, Bardoulat I, Courtial F, Maurel F, Bazin JÉ, CRREA Study Group, AzuRea Group: The daily cost of ICU patients: A micro-costing study in 23 French Intensive Care Units. Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med; 2015 Jun;34(3):151-7
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  • [Title] The daily cost of ICU patients: A micro-costing study in 23 French Intensive Care Units.
  • OBJECTIVES: To estimate the daily cost of intensive care unit (ICU) stays via micro-costing.
  • Each ICU randomly enrolled 5 admitted adult patients with a simplified acute physiology II score ≥ 15 and with at least one major intensive care medical procedure.
  • All health-care human resources used by each patient over a 24-hour period were recorded, as well as all medications, laboratory analyses, investigations, tests, consumables and administrative expenses.
  • RESULTS: One hundred and four patients were included (mean age: 62.3 ± 14.9 years, mean SAPS II: 51.5 ± 16.1, mean SOFA on the study day: 6.9 ± 4.3).
  • Over 24 hours, 29 to 186 interventions per patient were performed by different caregivers, leading to a mean total time spent for patient care of 13:32 ± 05:00 h.
  • The total daily cost per patient was € 1425 ± € 520 (95% CI = € 1323 to € 1526).
  • Patient-dependent expenses (€ 842 ± € 521) represented 59% of the total daily cost.
  • CONCLUSION: The average cost of one day of ICU care in French National Hospitals is strongly correlated with the duration of bedside-care carried out by human resources.
  • [MeSH-major] Critical Care / economics. Intensive Care Units / economics

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
  • (PMID = 25986476.001).
  • [ISSN] 2352-5568
  • [Journal-full-title] Anaesthesia, critical care & pain medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Observational Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cost / ICU
  • [Investigator] Mofredj A; Boudon M; Jacques L; Guerin-Robardey AM; Cabalion J; Roth C; Delastre O; Dupont A; Demory D; Durand-Gasselin J; Cougot P; Samba D; Quenot JP; Tonnelier JM; Jung B; Chanques G; Villiers D; Lobjoie É; de Filippis; Cantais E; Fulgenci JP; Mira JP
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58. Gisquet H, Gangloff P, Graff P, Phulpin B, Cortese S, Deganello A, Mastronicolaa R, Guillemin F, Verhaeghe LJ, Dolivet G: [Microsurgical reconstruction and full management of patients with head and neck cancer: importance of a quality approach and a patient care team]. Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord); 2009;130(4-5):249-54
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Microsurgical reconstruction and full management of patients with head and neck cancer: importance of a quality approach and a patient care team].
  • [Transliterated title] Reconstruction microchirurgicale et prise en charge globale des patients porteurs de cancer ORL: l'importance d'une approche qualité et d'un circuit protocolisé.
  • OBJECTIVE: To establish a kind of quality approach to the management of patients with head and neck cancers.
  • 54 patients who received microsurgical reconstruction after head and neck cancer were included in this study between 1997 and 2006.
  • The success rate is superior when more than one draining vein is sutured to the flap for patients with a BMI >20.
  • CONCLUSION: According to current literature, the survival rate of these patients is better when the overall time care is less than 100 days.
  • Therefore, we propose to include these patients in a circuit protocolisation care, which saves time, to better inform patients and improve survival rates.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / mortality. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Patient Care Team. Quality Assurance, Health Care. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 20597406.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-1334
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue de laryngologie - otologie - rhinologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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59. Appelbaum PS, Schaffner K, Meisel A: Responsibility and compensation for tardive dyskinesia. Am J Psychiatry; 1985 Jul;142(7):806-10
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  • These remedies include placing liability on manufacturers, asking society as a whole to bear the burden, and allowing patients with tardive dyskinesia to continue to carry the costs of their injuries.
  • In attempting to influence policy in this area, psychiatrists should be sensitive to the implications of any policy for patient care.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antipsychotic Agents / adverse effects. Costs and Cost Analysis. Drug Industry / standards. Financing, Government / legislation & jurisprudence. Health Policy. Humans. Informed Consent / legislation & jurisprudence. Malpractice. Patient Advocacy / legislation & jurisprudence. Social Justice. United States

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  • (PMID = 2861753.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-953X
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH-00456
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 20203
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Legal Approach / Mental Health Therapies / Professional Patient Relationship
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: patient care/drugs; KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: patient care/mentally disabled; KIE/ Full author name: Appelbaum, Paul S; KIE/ Full author name: Schaffner, Kenneth F; KIE/ Full author name: Meisel, Alan
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60. Dembelé S, Ouédraogo H, Macq J, Godin I, Kittel F, Dujardin B: [A patient-centered approach to tuberculosis control in Burkina Faso]. Sante; 2008 Jul-Sep;18(3):135-40
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  • [Title] [A patient-centered approach to tuberculosis control in Burkina Faso].
  • [Transliterated title] L'approche centrée sur le patient pour la lutte contre la tuberculose au Burkina Faso.
  • BACKGROUND: The Burkina Faso health system is divided into 55 health districts (DS), each with more than 10 primary care health centers (CSPS) that comprise the first level of the health care system.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the patient-centered approach to tuberculosis control on the detection and treatment of tuberculosis.
  • RESULTS: The proportion of patients suspected of tuberculosis who chose sputum sampling in the CSPS was higher in the rural district (Gorom-Gorom) than in the urban one (Pissy): 46% versus 18.7% (p < 0.001).
  • [MeSH-minor] Burkina Faso. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Humans. Patient-Centered Care. Rural Population. Urban Population

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  • (PMID = 19359234.001).
  • [ISSN] 1157-5999
  • [Journal-full-title] Santé (Montrouge, France)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sante
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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61. Schonberger RB, Dai F, Brandt CA, Burg MM: Balancing Model Performance and Simplicity to Predict Postoperative Primary Care Blood Pressure Elevation. Anesth Analg; 2015 Sep;121(3):632-41
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  • [Title] Balancing Model Performance and Simplicity to Predict Postoperative Primary Care Blood Pressure Elevation.
  • BACKGROUND: Because of uncertainty regarding the reliability of perioperative blood pressures and traditional notions downplaying the role of anesthesiologists in longitudinal patient care, there is no consensus for anesthesiologists to recommend postoperative primary care blood pressure follow-up for patients presenting for surgery with an increased blood pressure.
  • If an acceptable decision rule was developed, a new practice paradigm integrating the surgical encounter into broader public health efforts could be tested, with the goal of reducing long-term morbidity from hypertension among surgical patients.
  • METHODS: Using national data from US veterans receiving surgical care, we determined the prevalence of poorly controlled outpatient clinic blood pressures ≥140/90 mm Hg, based on the mean of up to 4 readings in the year after surgery.
  • RESULTS: Among 215,621 patients, poorly controlled outpatient clinic blood pressure was present postoperatively in 25.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25.5%-25.9%) including 14.2% (95% CI, 13.9%-14.6%) of patients lacking a hypertension history.
  • A preoperative blood pressure threshold ≥150/95 mm Hg, calculated as the mean of 2 readings, identified patients more likely than not to demonstrate outpatient clinic blood pressures in the hypertensive range.
  • Four of 5 patients not meeting this criterion were indeed found to be normotensive during outpatient clinic follow-up (positive predictive value, 51.5%; 95% CI, 51.0-52.0; negative predictive value, 79.6%; 95% CI, 79.4-79.7).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In a national cohort of surgical patients, poorly controlled postoperative clinic blood pressure was present in >1 of 4 patients (95% CI, 25.5%-25.9%).
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Pressure / physiology. Hypertension / diagnosis. Postoperative Care / methods. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Primary Health Care / methods. Veterans

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  • (PMID = 26214552.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-7598
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesia and analgesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesth. Analg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / K23 HL116641; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / K23HL116641; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR024139; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1RR024139
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS699981 [Available on 09/01/16]; NLM/ PMC4545382 [Available on 09/01/16]
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62. McGilton K, Irwin-Robinson H, Boscart V, Spanjevic L: Communication enhancement: nurse and patient satisfaction outcomes in a complex continuing care facility. J Adv Nurs; 2006 Apr;54(1):35-44
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  • [Title] Communication enhancement: nurse and patient satisfaction outcomes in a complex continuing care facility.
  • AIMS: This paper presents an evaluation of a communication enhancement intervention on staff and patients in a complex continuing care facility.
  • BACKGROUND: The importance of effective communication as a fundamental element of nursing has been emphasized and is regarded as integral to the provision of quality patient care.
  • For people residing in complex continuing care (similar to long-term care facilities), opportunities for socialization occur primarily during interactions or communication with staff, and these interactions have been found to be limited.
  • METHODS: Twenty-one nursing staff members (Registered Nurses, Registered Practical Nurses and healthcare aides) working in a complex continuing care environment and 16 patients participated in this study, conducted in the summer of 2003.
  • Data were collected from patients and nurses at baseline, 5 weeks into the intervention and at 10 weeks after the intervention.
  • Nurse outcome variables included nurses' job satisfaction and their relationships with patients; patient outcome variables included two measures of patient satisfaction with care.
  • RESULTS: Nursing staff felt closer to their patients (F(2,40) = 3.0, P = 0.045) following the intervention and reported higher levels of job satisfaction (F(2,40) = 4.1, P = 0.02).
  • No changes were found in the level of patient satisfaction with care.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that nursing staff can feel better about their job and about their patients as they enhance their communication skills.
  • Understanding the barriers to finding time to talk with patients for a few minutes a day, outside of direct hands-on caregiving, requires further exploration.
  • [MeSH-major] Communication. Nurse-Patient Relations
  • [MeSH-minor] Attitude of Health Personnel. Attitude to Health. Education, Nursing, Continuing / methods. Empathy. Female. Humans. Job Satisfaction. Long-Term Care / psychology. Male. Middle Aged. Nursing Care / psychology. Patient Satisfaction. Quality of Health Care. Social Perception

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  • (PMID = 16553689.001).
  • [ISSN] 0309-2402
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of advanced nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adv Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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63. Kripalani S, LeFevre F, Phillips CO, Williams MV, Basaviah P, Baker DW: Deficits in communication and information transfer between hospital-based and primary care physicians: implications for patient safety and continuity of care. JAMA; 2007 Feb 28;297(8):831-41
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  • [Title] Deficits in communication and information transfer between hospital-based and primary care physicians: implications for patient safety and continuity of care.
  • CONTEXT: Delayed or inaccurate communication between hospital-based and primary care physicians at hospital discharge may negatively affect continuity of care and contribute to adverse events.
  • DATA EXTRACTION: Data from observational studies were extracted on the availability, timeliness, content, and format of discharge communications, as well as primary care physician satisfaction.
  • DATA SYNTHESIS: Direct communication between hospital physicians and primary care physicians occurred infrequently (3%-20%).
  • The availability of a discharge summary at the first postdischarge visit was low (12%-34%) and remained poor at 4 weeks (51%-77%), affecting the quality of care in approximately 25% of follow-up visits and contributing to primary care physician dissatisfaction.
  • Discharge summaries often lacked important information such as diagnostic test results (missing from 33%-63%), treatment or hospital course (7%-22%), discharge medications (2%-40%), test results pending at discharge (65%), patient or family counseling (90%-92%), and follow-up plans (2%-43%).
  • Several interventions, including computer-generated discharge summaries and using patients as couriers, shortened the delivery time of discharge communications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Deficits in communication and information transfer at hospital discharge are common and may adversely affect patient care.
  • Interventions such as computer-generated summaries and standardized formats may facilitate more timely transfer of pertinent patient information to primary care physicians and make discharge summaries more consistently available during follow-up care.
  • [MeSH-major] Continuity of Patient Care / standards. Hospitalists. Interdisciplinary Communication. Patient Discharge. Physicians, Family
  • [MeSH-minor] Aftercare / standards. Humans. Quality of Health Care. United States

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  • (PMID = 17327525.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3598
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / BHP HRSA HHS / PE / 2-T32-PE10025; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / K12 RR017643; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / K23 HL077597
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 133
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64. Sun F, Schoelles KM, Coates VH: Assessing the utility of genetic tests. J Ambul Care Manage; 2013 Jul-Sep;36(3):222-32
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  • While the introduction of new genetic tests creates tremendous potential for improving patient care, it is essential to adequately evaluate these tests to ensure their accuracy and utility for clinical practice.

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  • (PMID = 23748269.001).
  • [ISSN] 1550-3267
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of ambulatory care management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Ambul Care Manage
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 290-2007-10063-I
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
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65. Mathoulin-Pélissier S, Bécouarn Y, Belleannée G, Pinon E, Jaffré A, Coureau G, Auby D, Renaud-Salis JL, Rullier E, Regional Aquitaine Group for Colorectal cancer GRACCOR: Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors. BMC Cancer; 2012;12:297
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  • [Title] Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors.
  • BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines.
  • The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care.
  • METHODS: CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included.
  • We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥ 12 lymph nodes (LN), non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively.
  • RESULTS: We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68%) with colon and 381 (32%) with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals.
  • Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients.
  • In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients.
  • 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy.
  • Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location); whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / standards. Cohort Studies. Female. France. Hospitals / standards. Humans. Male. Patient Care / methods. Patient Care / standards. Prospective Studies. Quality Assurance, Health Care. Quality Indicators, Health Care

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  • (PMID = 22813349.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3527146
  • [Investigator] Abdiche S; Adhoute X; Arnal JC; Arotçarena R; Auby D; Audemar F; Avril A; Balabaud C; Baldit C; Bancons J; Barandon E; Barberis C; Bayle J; Bayol B; Belliard R; Berthélémy P; Berthoux L; Beyssac R; Blanc JF; Boisseau C; Bonichon N; Bonichon P; Boudinet F; Bouet C; Boutillier P; Breque M; Bretagnol F; Breuillé G; Brocard H; Brudieux E; Brunet R; Buy E; Calabet J; Calès V; Cany L; Carles J; Carles B; Cayla R; Cazals JB; Cazenave JL; Cazenave JL; Cazenave-Mahe JP; Cazorla S; Chacon JB; Champbenoit P; Chastan P; Chaussende C; Chossat I; Claracq M; Collet D; Coomans D; Coquard JL; Cordet F; Couderc B; Couzigou P; Dahan O; Dantin B; Dauba J; David XR; Letout; Debenes B; Delvert D; Deret C; Desprez D; Dohollou N; Dost C; Dromer C; Dubuisson V; Dumas F; Dumora V; Echinard E; El Kohen D; Evrard S; Fitoussi O; Fonck M; Fromenteau C; Gaultier T; Gauriau L; Gheysens B; Goffre B; Gontier R; Griot JB; Guichandut JP; Guichard F; Humbert A; Imbert Y; Jaubert D; Junes F; Kin B; Labat J; Laborde Y; Lamy A; Larregain-Fournier D; Larroude D; Larrue PH; Laurent C; Le Roux G; Le Toux N; Le Trong L; Lecesne R; Ledaguenel P; Lepoutre A; Letout; Levache CB; Lévêque AM; Lotte P; Lariviere I; Loze S; Lupo R; Machané K; Magne E; Magnien F; Mahé P; Mallier N; Mannant PR; Manouvrier JL; Marty F; Masson B; Maton O; Mauriac JC; Minet F; Miremont F; Moussié D; Ndobo F; Nobili S; Noury D; Ogouchi J; Oui B; Pansieri M; Parent Y; Pariente A; Peluchon P; Pichon JF; Prevost B; Puech P; Pujol J; Rallier H; Rault A; Reboul G; Remuzon P; Rémy S; Richard-Molard B; Roussy P; Roux D; SaCunha A; Santoni P; Saric J; Sarkissian M; Schang JC; Simon G; Smith D; Stépani P; Talbi P; Texereau P; Trufflandier N; Turner K; Vendrely V; Vergier JF; Weber F
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66. Gibson JL, Bean S, Chidwick P, Godkin D, Sibbald RW, Wagner F: Ethical framework for resource allocation during a drug supply shortage. Healthc Q; 2012;15(3):26-35
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  • Frequently, shortages are successfully addressed through conservation and redistribution efforts, with limited impact on patient care.
  • The potential for an extreme scarcity of some drugs raised ethical concerns about patient care, including the need to limit access to some health services.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Care Rationing / ethics. Health Care Rationing / organization & administration. Pharmaceutical Preparations / supply & distribution

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  • (PMID = 22986563.001).
  • [ISSN] 1710-2774
  • [Journal-full-title] Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Healthc Q
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Pharmaceutical Preparations
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67. Brown M, Tucker P, Rapport F, Hutchings H, Dahlgren A, Davies G, Ebden P: The impact of shift patterns on junior doctors' perceptions of fatigue, training, work/life balance and the role of social support. Qual Saf Health Care; 2010 Dec;19(6):e36
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  • METHOD: Interviews and focus groups were used to explore perceptions among junior doctors and hospital managers regarding the impact of the European Working Time Directive on patient care and doctors' well-being.
  • Poorly designed shift rotas can have negative impacts on junior doctors' professional performance and educational training, with implications for clinical practice, patient care and the welfare of junior doctors.


68. Baumann A, Cuignet-Royer E, Cornet C, Trueck S, Heck M, Taron F, Peignier C, Chastel A, Gervais P, Bouaziz H, Audibert G, Mertes PM: [Interest of evaluation of professional practice for the improvement of the management of postoperative pain with patient controlled analgesia (PCA)]. Ann Fr Anesth Reanim; 2010 Oct;29(10):693-8
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  • [Title] [Interest of evaluation of professional practice for the improvement of the management of postoperative pain with patient controlled analgesia (PCA)].
  • [Transliterated title] Intérêt de l'EPP pour l'amélioration de la prise en charge de la douleur postopératoire par analgésie contrôlée par le patient (ACP).
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the daily practice of postoperative PCA in Nancy University Hospital, in continuity with a quality program of postoperative pain (POP) care conducted in 2003.
  • TYPE OF STUDY: A retrospective audit of patient medical records.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A review of all the medical records of consecutive surgical patients managed by PCA over a 5-week period in six surgical services.
  • RESULTS: Assessment of the hospital means: temperature chart including pain scores and PCA drug consumption, patient information leaflet, PCA protocol, postoperative pre-filled prescription form (PFPF) for post-anaesthesia care including PCA, and optional training of nurses in postoperative pain management.
  • EVALUATION OF PRACTICES: One hundred and fifty-nine files of a total of 176 patients were analyzed (88%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The usefulness of a pre-filled prescription form for post-anaesthesia care including PCA prescription is demonstrated.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesia, Patient-Controlled / standards. Pain, Postoperative / drug therapy. Practice Patterns, Physicians'

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20729031.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6623
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales françaises d'anesthèsie et de rèanimation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Fr Anesth Reanim
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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69. Höll B, Spat S, Plank J, Schaupp L, Neubauer K, Beck P, Chiarugi F, Kontogiannis V, Pieber TR, Holzinger A: Design of a mobile, safety-critical in-patient glucose management system. Stud Health Technol Inform; 2011;169:950-4
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  • [Title] Design of a mobile, safety-critical in-patient glucose management system.
  • In order to support in-patient care, we designed a prototypical mobile in-patient glucose management system with decision support for insulin dosing.
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Communication. Computers, Handheld. Decision Support Techniques. Humans. Self Care. Software. Software Design. User-Computer Interface. Workflow

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  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Diabetes.
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  • (PMID = 21893886.001).
  • [ISSN] 0926-9630
  • [Journal-full-title] Studies in health technology and informatics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stud Health Technol Inform
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose
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70. Piers RD, Azoulay E, Ricou B, Dekeyser Ganz F, Decruyenaere J, Max A, Michalsen A, Maia PA, Owczuk R, Rubulotta F, Depuydt P, Meert AP, Reyners AK, Aquilina A, Bekaert M, Van den Noortgate NJ, Schrauwen WJ, Benoit DD, APPROPRICUS Study Group of the Ethics Section of the ESICM: Perceptions of appropriateness of care among European and Israeli intensive care unit nurses and physicians. JAMA; 2011 Dec 28;306(24):2694-703
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  • [Title] Perceptions of appropriateness of care among European and Israeli intensive care unit nurses and physicians.
  • CONTEXT: Clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs) who perceive the care they provide as inappropriate experience moral distress and are at risk for burnout.
  • This situation may jeopardize patient quality of care and increase staff turnover.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of perceived inappropriateness of care among ICU clinicians and to identify patient-related situations, personal characteristics, and work-related characteristics associated with perceived inappropriateness of care.
  • Participants were 1953 ICU nurses and physicians providing bedside care.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Perceived inappropriateness of care, defined as a specific patient-care situation in which the clinician acts in a manner contrary to his or her personal and professional beliefs, as assessed using a questionnaire designed for the study.
  • RESULTS: Of 1651 respondents (median response rate, 93% overall; interquartile range, 82%-100% [medians 93% among nurses and 100% among physicians]), perceived inappropriateness of care in at least 1 patient was reported by 439 clinicians overall (27%; 95% CI, 24%-29%), 300 of 1218 were nurses (25%), 132 of 407 were physicians (32%), and 26 had missing answers describing job title.
  • Of these 439 individuals, 397 reported 445 situations associated with perceived inappropriateness of care.
  • The most common reports were perceived disproportionate care (290 situations [65%; 95% CI, 58%-73%], of which "too much care" was reported in 89% of situations, followed by "other patients would benefit more" (168 situations [38%; 95% CI, 32%-43%]).
  • Independently associated with perceived inappropriateness of care rates both among nurses and physicians were symptom control decisions directed by physicians only (odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% CI, 1.17-2.56; P = .006); involvement of nurses in end-of-life decision making (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.96; P = .02); good collaboration between nurses and physicians (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56-0.92; P = .009); and freedom to decide how to perform work-related tasks (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.89; P = .002); while a high perceived workload was significantly associated among nurses only (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.07-2.06; P = .02).
  • Perceived inappropriateness of care was independently associated with higher intent to leave a job (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.04-2.63; P = .03).
  • In the subset of 69 ICUs for which patient data could be linked, clinicians reported received inappropriateness of care in 207 patients, representing 23% (95% CI, 20%-27%) of 883 ICU beds.
  • CONCLUSION: Among a group of European and Israeli ICU clinicians, perceptions of inappropriate care were frequently reported and were inversely associated with factors indicating good teamwork.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Intensive Care Units / standards. Nurses / psychology. Patient Care / standards. Physicians / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Burnout, Professional. Cross-Sectional Studies. Europe. Female. Humans. Interprofessional Relations. Israel. Job Satisfaction. Male. Organizational Culture. Patient Care Team. Quality of Health Care. Terminal Care / standards. Unnecessary Procedures

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  • [CommentIn] Arch Intern Med. 2012 Jun 11;172(11):889-90 [22688994.001]
  • [CommentIn] JAMA. 2011 Dec 28;306(24):2725-6 [22203544.001]
  • [CommentIn] JAMA. 2012 Apr 4;307(13):1370; author reply 1371-2 [22474195.001]
  • [CommentIn] JAMA. 2012 Apr 4;307(13):1370-1; author reply 1371-2 [22474196.001]
  • (PMID = 22203538.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3598
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Investigator] Piers; Azoulay; Ricou; DeKeyser Ganz; Decruyenaere; Benoit; Depuydt P; Piers R; Benoit D; Decruyenaere J; Mauws N; De Cock C; De Neve N; De Decker K; Nonneman B; Swinnen W; Bourgeois M; De laet I; Jans A; Meert AP; Stevens E; Dechamps P; Vallot F; Devriendt J; Laterre PF; Lemaitre F; Norrenberg M; Max A; Lafabrie A; Lemiale V; Azoulay E; Schlemmer B; Mira JP; Zuber B; Bonneton B; Baillat L; Compagnon F; Mégarbane B; Baud F; Antona M; Sharshar T; Annane D; Lautrette A; Souweine B; Legriel S; Bedos JP; Garrouste-Orgeas M; Bruel C; Philippart F; Misset B; Fieux F; Jacob L; Das V; Pallot JL; Rabbat A; Vincent F; Cohen Y; Thirion M; Mentec H; Michalsen A; Weller L; Kubitza S; Schweiger D; Clement R; Mörer O; Kurzweg V; Plattner M; Schneider J; Schoser G; Raanan O; Ben Nun M; Cerchiari E; Petrini F; Cabrini L; Rubulotta G; Conti A; Rabeschi G; Andretto B; Aquilina A; Wujtewicz MA; Misiolek H; Wenski W; Onichimowski D; Machala W; Czajkowska M; Maciejewski D; Szurlej D; Maia P; Coutinho P; Lúzio J; Branco M; Maul E; Esteves F; Faria F; Castelões P; Pereira AA; Barbosa S; Dias C; Ricou B; Zender H; Zürcher R; Sridharan G; Friolet R; Karachristianidou A; Malacrida R; Penati G; Llamas M; Perren A; Pagnamenta A; Reyners AK; Heesink A; Gerritsen R; Sleeswijk M; Lutisan J; Janssen R
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71. McGrath F, Morgenweck L: Rebuilding a clinical workstation with spider's silk of the Web. Bull Med Libr Assoc; 1999 Oct;87(4):387-92
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  • The Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH) clinical workstation came into existence in 1993 to provide a simple menu-driven interface to high use information systems that would be easily accessible on the wards and in the intensive care units.
  • Direct Internet access, advances in Web-based software, and greater cooperation between Yale-New Haven Hospital and Yale School of Medicine network technology groups have enabled the clinical workstations to become an integral tool for providing clinical care.
  • The workstation provides bedside access to an expanding array of internal and external resources to support patient care and has the potential to become the basis for an interface that will be utilized throughout the multi-location Yale-New Haven Healthcare System.

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  • [Cites] Med Ref Serv Q. 1997 Winter;16(4):1-18 [10176645.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Annu Symp Comput Appl Med Care. 1993;:554-8 [8130535.001]
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  • (PMID = 10550023.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7338
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin of the Medical Library Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Med Libr Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NLM NIH HHS / LM / G08LM05366
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC226613
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72. McIntosh N, Meterko M, Burgess JF Jr, Restuccia JD, Kartha A, Kaboli P, Charns M: Organizational predictors of coordination in inpatient medicine. Health Care Manage Rev; 2014 Oct-Dec;39(4):279-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: As the care of hospitalized patients becomes more complex, intraprofessional coordination among nurses and among physicians, and interprofessional coordination between these groups are likely to play an increasingly important role in the provision of hospital care.
  • FINDINGS: Organizational factors that were common across models and associated with better provider ratings of OCIM included provider perceptions that the goals of senior leadership are aligned with those of the inpatient service and that the facility is committed to the highest quality of patient care, having resources and staff that enable clinicians to do their jobs, and use of strategies that enhance interactions and communication among and between nurses and physicians.
  • PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: To improve intraprofessional and interprofessional coordination and, consequently, patient care, facilities should consider making patient care quality a more important strategic organizational priority; ensuring that providers have the staffing, training, supplies, and other resources they need to do their jobs; and implementing strategies that improve interprofessional communication and working relationships, such as multidisciplinary rounding.
  • [MeSH-major] Continuity of Patient Care / organization & administration. Hospital Administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Cross-Sectional Studies. Humans. Medical Staff, Hospital / organization & administration. Nursing Staff, Hospital / organization & administration. Patient Care Team / organization & administration. Quality Improvement / organization & administration. Quality of Health Care / organization & administration

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  • (PMID = 24378402.001).
  • [ISSN] 1550-5030
  • [Journal-full-title] Health care management review
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Care Manage Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Uhlmann RF, Clark H, Pearlman RA, Downs JC, Addison JH, Haining RG: Medical management decisions in nursing home patients. Principles and policy recommendations. Ann Intern Med; 1987 Jun;106(6):879-85
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  • [Title] Medical management decisions in nursing home patients. Principles and policy recommendations.
  • The ethical principles of medical decision making are inherently the same for nursing home residents, who represent an increasingly large segment of the population, as they are for other adult patients.
  • Notably, a large proportion of nursing home patients are at high risk for morbid and mortal events yet are incapable of expressing medical management preferences due to dementia and confusion.
  • Policies and procedures regarding medical decisions for nursing home patients are needed.
  • We present and discuss a policy for patient care in nursing homes based on recommendations of a national biomedical ethics committee.
  • This policy, which may be adapted for use in specific institutions, explicitly discusses the principles of care and their application in nursing homes.
  • It also encourages prospective decision making and provides advance care directives for patients making and provides advance care directives for patients and their decision-making surrogates to do so.
  • [MeSH-major] Decision Making, Organizational. Nursing Homes. Patient Advocacy
  • [MeSH-minor] Ethics Committees, Clinical. Ethics, Professional. Family. Humans. Patient Participation. Patient Selection. Personal Autonomy. Policy Making. Withholding Treatment

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  • (PMID = 3579072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4819
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / AG00265
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 24694
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Death and Euthanasia / King County (Washington) Medical Society / Professional Patient Relationship
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: allowing to die/advance directives; KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: patient care/aged; KIE/ Full author name: Uhlmann, Richard F; KIE/ Full author name: Clark, Hugh; KIE/ Full author name: Pearlman, Robert A; KIE/ Full author name: Downs, Joseph CM; KIE/ Full author name: Addison, John H; KIE/ Full author name: Haining, Robert G
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74. León SA, Fontelo P, Green L, Ackerman M, Liu F: Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak; 2007;7:5
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  • BACKGROUND: This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital.
  • In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities.
  • A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Phones. Evidence-Based Medicine / methods. Hospitals, Community. Internal Medicine / education. Internet. Internship and Residency. Point-of-Care Systems / standards

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  • [Cites] Fam Med. 2003 Apr;35(4):257-60 [12729309.001]
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  • (PMID = 17313680.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-6947
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC medical informatics and decision making
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Med Inform Decis Mak
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1805745
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75. Rosenbluth G, Bale JF, Starmer AJ, Spector ND, Srivastava R, West DC, Sectish TC, Landrigan CP, I-PASS Study Education Executive Committee: Variation in printed handoff documents: Results and recommendations from a multicenter needs assessment. J Hosp Med; 2015 Aug;10(8):517-24
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Handoffs of patient care are a leading root cause of medical errors.
  • The expert panel recommended the following as essential for all printed handoffs: assessment of illness severity, patient summary, action items, situation awareness and contingency plans, allergies, medications, age, weight, date of admission, and patient and hospital service identifiers.
  • Standardizing printed handoff documents has the potential to decrease omissions of key data during patient care transitions, which may decrease the risk of downstream medical errors.

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  • [Copyright] © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.
  • (PMID = 26014471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1553-5606
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hospital medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Hosp Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 1K12HS019456; United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 1K12HS019456-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Investigator] Landrigan CP; Noble EL; Sectish TC; Tse LL; O'Toole JK; Starmer AJ; Bismilla Z; Coffey M; Destino LA; Everhart JL; Patel SJ; Hepps JH; Lopreiato JO; Yu CE; Bale JF Jr; Stevenson AT; Cole F; Calaman S; Spector ND; Rosenbluth G; West DC
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76. Mosley I, Nicol M, Donnan G, Patrick I, Kerr F, Dewey H: The impact of ambulance practice on acute stroke care. Stroke; 2007 Oct;38(10):2765-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The impact of ambulance practice on acute stroke care.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Few patients with acute stroke are treated with alteplase, often due to significant prehospital delays after symptom onset.
  • METHODS: During a 6-month period in 2004, all ambulance-transported patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack arriving from a geographically defined region in Melbourne, Australia (population 383,000) to one of 3 hospital emergency departments were assessed prospectively.
  • RESULTS: One hundred ninety-eight patients were included in the study.
  • One hundred eighty-seven ambulance patient care records were complete and available for analysis.
  • This highlights the importance of including ambulance practice in comprehensive care pathways that span the whole process of stroke care.
  • [MeSH-major] Allied Health Personnel. Ambulances. Comprehensive Health Care. Stroke / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17717317.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stroke
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Sprangers MA, Sloan JA, Veenhoven R, Cleeland CS, Halyard MY, Abertnethy AP, Baas F, Barsevick AM, Bartels M, Boomsma DI, Chauhan C, Dueck AC, Frost MH, Hall P, Klepstad P, Martin NG, Miaskowski C, Mosing M, Movsas B, Van Noorden CJ, Patrick DL, Pedersen NL, Ropka ME, Shi Q, Shinozaki G, Singh JA, Yang P, Zwinderman AH: The establishment of the GENEQOL consortium to investigate the genetic disposition of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Twin Res Hum Genet; 2009 Jun;12(3):301-11
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  • [Title] The establishment of the GENEQOL consortium to investigate the genetic disposition of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes.
  • To our knowledge, no comprehensive, interdisciplinary initiatives have been taken to examine the role of genetic variants on patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes.
  • The overall objective of this paper is to describe the establishment of an international and interdisciplinary consortium, the GENEQOL Consortium, which intends to investigate the genetic disposition of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes.
  • We have identified five primary patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes as initial targets: negative psychological affect, positive psychological affect, self-rated physical health, pain, and fatigue.
  • The second objective is to design a research agenda to investigate and validate those genes and genetic variants of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes, by creating large datasets.
  • During its first meeting, the Consortium has discussed draft summary documents addressing these questions for each patient-reported quality-of-life outcome.
  • Insight into the genetic versus environmental components of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes will ultimately allow us to explore new pathways for improving patient care.
  • If we can identify patients who are susceptible to poor quality of life, we will be able to better target specific clinical interventions to enhance their quality of life and treatment outcomes.

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  • (PMID = 19456223.001).
  • [ISSN] 1832-4274
  • [Journal-full-title] Twin research and human genetics : the official journal of the International Society for Twin Studies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Twin Res Hum Genet
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / KL2 RR024151-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA025224; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA025224-230006
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS171998; NLM/ PMC2824176
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78. Burns T, Catty J, Harvey K, White S, Jones IR, McLaren S, Wykes T, ECHO Group: Continuity of care for carers of people with severe mental illness: results of a longitudinal study. Int J Soc Psychiatry; 2013 Nov;59(7):663-70
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  • [Title] Continuity of care for carers of people with severe mental illness: results of a longitudinal study.
  • INTRODUCTION: Continuity of care has been demonstrated to be important for service users and carer groups have voiced major concerns over disruptions of care.
  • We aimed to assess the experienced continuity of care in carers of patients with both psychotic and non-psychotic disorders and explore its association with carer characteristics and psychological well-being.
  • METHODS: Friends and relatives caring for two groups of service users in the care of community mental health teams (CMHTs), 69 with psychotic and 38 with non-psychotic disorders, were assessed annually at three and two time points, respectively.
  • CONTINUES, a measure specifically designed to assess continuity of care for carers themselves, was utilized along with assessments of psychological well-being and caregiving.
  • They reported moderately low continuity of care.
  • For those caring for people with psychotic disorders, reported continuity was higher if the carer was male, employed, lived with the user and had had a carer's assessment; for those caring for people with non-psychotic disorders, it was higher if the carer was from the service user's immediate family, lived with them and had had a carer's assessment.
  • CONCLUSION: The vast majority of the carers had not had a carer's assessment provided by the CMHT despite this being a clear national priority and being an intervention with obvious potential to increase carers' reported low levels of continuity of care.
  • Improving continuity of contact with carers may have an important part to play in the overall improvement of care in this patient group and deserves greater attention.
  • [MeSH-major] Caregivers / psychology. Continuity of Patient Care. Mental Disorders / nursing

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  • (PMID = 22904167.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-2854
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of social psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Soc Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Continuity of care / carers / emotional wellbeing / severe and enduring mental illness
  • [Investigator] Burns T; Catty J; Clement S; Harvey K; White S; Anderson T; Cowan N; Ellis G; Eracleous H; Geyer C; Lissouba P; Poole Z; Jones IR; Ahmed N; Rose D; Wykes T; Sweeney A; McLaren S; Belling R; Davies J; Lemma F; Whittock M
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79. Hurley AC, Volicer L, Rempusheski VF, Fry ST: Reaching consensus: the process of recommending treatment decisions for Alzheimer's patients. ANS Adv Nurs Sci; 1995 Dec;18(2):33-43
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  • [Title] Reaching consensus: the process of recommending treatment decisions for Alzheimer's patients.
  • Observational and interview data obtained from nurse caregivers and family members of patients with late-stage Alzheimer's disease were analyzed to explicate the nursing role in advance proxy planning.
  • A four-phase model, Achieving Consensus: Decision Making to Determine Treatment Options for Patients with Alzheimer's Disease, was developed.
  • Patient decline, family coping, professional development of nursing staff, and nursing unit philosophy were community characteristics found to be important antecedents to the process of reaching consensus.
  • Achieving consensus constructs included interactive process components of patient, family, and staff adjustment, caring, and knowing.
  • Consequences included the advance proxy plan and patient care.
  • [MeSH-major] Advance Care Planning. Alzheimer Disease / nursing. Decision Making. Legal Guardians. Models, Nursing. Nurse's Role. Terminal Care

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  • (PMID = 8585706.001).
  • [ISSN] 0161-9268
  • [Journal-full-title] ANS. Advances in nursing science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ANS Adv Nurs Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / 5R03NR02829
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 57500; NRCBL/ 8.3.3
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Death and Euthanasia / Empirical Approach / Mental Health Therapies / Professional Patient Relationship
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: patient care/mentally disabled; KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: terminal care; KIE/ Full author name: Hurley, Ann C; KIE/ Full author name: Volicer, Ladislav; KIE/ Full author name: Rempusheski, Veronica F; KIE/ Full author name: Fry, Sara T
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80. Nathan N, Taam RA, Epaud R, Delacourt C, Deschildre A, Reix P, Chiron R, de Pontbriand U, Brouard J, Fayon M, Dubus JC, Giovannini-Chami L, Bremont F, Bessaci K, Schweitzer C, Dalphin ML, Marguet C, Houdouin V, Troussier F, Sardet A, Hullo E, Gibertini I, Mahloul M, Michon D, Priouzeau A, Galeron L, Vibert JF, Thouvenin G, Corvol H, Deblic J, Clement A, French RespiRare® Group: A national internet-linked based database for pediatric interstitial lung diseases: the French network. Orphanet J Rare Dis; 2012;7:40
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  • After patient's parents' oral consent is obtained, physicians enter the data of children with ILD: identity, social data and environmental data; specific aetiological diagnosis of the ILD if known, genetics, patient visits to the centre, and all medical examinations and tests done for the diagnosis and/or during follow up.
  • Each participating centre has a free access to his own patients' data only, and cross-centre studies require mutual agreement.
  • Physicians may use the system as a daily aid for patient care through a web-linked medical file, backed on this database.
  • A specific aetiology was identified in 149 (72.7%) patients while 56 (27.3%) cases remain undiagnosed.
  • This database is a great opportunity to improve patient care and disease pathogenesis knowledge.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. France. Government Programs. Humans. Infant. Male. Patient Care. Rare Diseases


81. Buetow S, Fuehrer A, Macfarlane K, McConnell D, Moir F, Huggard P, Doerr H: Development and validation of a patient measure of doctor-patient caring. Patient Educ Couns; 2012 Feb;86(2):264-9
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  • [Title] Development and validation of a patient measure of doctor-patient caring.
  • OBJECTIVE: Conceptualising the doctor-patient relationship as a 'window mirror' exposes care delivery from doctor to self, doctor to patient, patient to self, and patient to doctor.
  • We aimed to develop and validate a patient questionnaire informed by this model.
  • Stage 2 surveyed 495 patients in general practice to assess the internal consistency and construct validity of the questionnaire.
  • Patients who care more about their doctor also care more about themselves.
  • A patient or doctor who cares about the other person is associated with increased self-care by that person.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Further development and testing of the patient questionnaire is warranted to validate measurement of how patients perceive the caring they and their doctor give, and receive from, each other.
  • PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: From the patient perspective the questionnaire may increase awareness of the importance of family doctors and patients caring about each other and themselves.
  • It may inform and evaluate medical students, educational programmes and caring in doctor-patient relationships.
  • [MeSH-major] Delivery of Health Care / standards. Patient Satisfaction. Physician-Patient Relations. Psychometrics. Surveys and Questionnaires
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Attitude of Health Personnel. Australia. Cross-Sectional Studies. Delphi Technique. Family Practice. Female. Health Care Surveys / methods. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Quality of Health Care. Reproducibility of Results. Self Care. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21592717.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5134
  • [Journal-full-title] Patient education and counseling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Patient Educ Couns
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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82. Hyams KC, Barrett DH, Duque D, Engel CC Jr, Friedl K, Gray G, Hogan B, Kaforski G, Murphy F, North R, Riddle J, Ryan MA, Trump DH, Wells J: The Recruit assessment Program: a program to collect comprehensive baseline health data from U.S. military personnel. Mil Med; 2002 Jan;167(1):44-7
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  • The RAP will serve several important functions, including automating enrollment into the military health care system, improving patient care and preventive medicine efforts, and providing critical data for investigations of health problems among military personnel and veterans.
  • If the feasibility of the RAP is demonstrated and the program is fully implemented throughout the DoD, it could provide a substantial improvement in health care delivery.

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  • (PMID = 11799812.001).
  • [ISSN] 0026-4075
  • [Journal-full-title] Military medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mil Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Warren N, Hodgson M, Craig T, Dyrenforth S, Perlin J, Murphy F, Veterans Health Administration: Employee working conditions and healthcare system performance: the Veterans Health Administration experience. J Occup Environ Med; 2007 Apr;49(4):417-29
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  • OBJECTIVE: The authors explored the association between health care employees' perceptions of their organizations and objective measures of system performance.
  • The authors analyzed cross-sectional associations between these perceptions and objective measures of health care system performance--employee and patient care outcomes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Organizational climate, policies, and resultant working conditions in health care institutions appear to be strong drivers of system performance.
  • Interventions directed toward improving care quality and safety should address these factors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cross-Sectional Studies. Health Care Surveys. Humans. Middle Aged. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). United States

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  • (PMID = 17426525.001).
  • [ISSN] 1076-2752
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Occup. Environ. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Slater NJ, Montgomery A, Berrevoet F, Carbonell AM, Chang A, Franklin M, Kercher KW, Lammers BJ, Parra-Davilla E, Roll S, Towfigh S, van Geffen E, Conze J, van Goor H: Criteria for definition of a complex abdominal wall hernia. Hernia; 2014 Feb;18(1):7-17
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  • There is need for clarification and classification to improve patient care and allow comparison of different surgical approaches.
  • The aim of this study was to reach consensus on criteria used to define a patient with "complex" hernia.
  • METHODS: Three consensus meetings were convened by surgeons with expertise in complex abdominal wall hernias, aimed at laying down criteria that can be used to define "complex hernia" patients, and to divide patients in severity classes.
  • To aid discussion, literature review was performed to identify hernia classification systems, and to find evidence for patient and hernia variables that influence treatment and/or prognosis.
  • RESULTS: Consensus was reached on 22 patient and hernia variables for "complex" hernia criteria inclusion which were grouped under four categories: "Size and location", "Contamination/soft tissue condition", "Patient history/risk factors", and "Clinical scenario".
  • These variables were further divided in three patient severity classes ('Minor', 'Moderate', and 'Major') to provide guidance for peri-operative planning and measures, the risk of a complicated post-operative course, and the extent of financial costs associated with treatment of these hernia patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Common criteria that can be used in defining and describing "complex" (abdominal wall) hernia patients have been identified and divided under four categories and three severity classes.
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Patient Care Planning. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Surgical Mesh. Terminology as Topic

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  • (PMID = 24150721.001).
  • [ISSN] 1248-9204
  • [Journal-full-title] Hernia : the journal of hernias and abdominal wall surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hernia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Consensus Development Conference; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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85. Alter MJ, Gerety RJ, Smallwood LA, Sampliner RE, Tabor E, Deinhardt F, Frösner G, Matanoski GM: Sporadic non-A, non-B hepatitis: frequency and epidemiology in an urban U.S. population. J Infect Dis; 1982 Jun;145(6):886-93
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  • Patients with acute viral hepatitis were identified at five hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland between February 1979-August 1980.
  • Of the 295 patients with serologically diagnosed hepatitis, 42% had non-A, non-B hepatitis; 48% had hepatitis B; and 10% had hepatitis A.
  • Compared with matched control patients with no liver disease, patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis more often had received a blood transfusion (11% vs. O, P less than 0.001), used parenteral drugs (42% vs. 4%, P less than 0.001), were employed as health workers in direct patient care or hospital laboratory work (6% vs. 3%, P less than 0.05), had personal contact with others who had hepatitis (16% vs. 1%, P less than 0.001), or had ingested raw shellfish (34% vs. 20%, P less than 0.01).
  • A history of previous clinical hepatitis and serologic markers indicating previous hepatitis B infection were found in patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis more often than in the control patients.
  • Chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis was found in 34 (42.5%) of 80 patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis.

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  • (PMID = 6806403.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-1899
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 223-79-1011; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 5M01RR00722-07
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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86. Lombarts KM, Plochg T, Thompson CA, Arah OA, DUQuE Project Consortium: Measuring professionalism in medicine and nursing: results of a European survey. PLoS One; 2014;9(5):e97069
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  • BACKGROUND: Leveraging professionalism has been put forward as a strategy to drive improvement of patient care.
  • Collectively leveraging professionalism as a quality improvement strategy may be beneficial to patient care quality.

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  • (PMID = 24849320.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4029578
  • [Investigator] Klazinga N; Kringos DS; Lombarts MJ; Plochg T; Lopez MA; Secanell M; Sunol R; Vallejo P; Bartels P; Kristensen S; Michel P; Saillour-Glenisson F; Vlcek F; Car M; Jones S; Klaus E; Bottaro S; Garel P; Saluvan M; Bruneau C; Depaigne-Loth A; Shaw C; Hammer A; Ommen O; Pfaff H; Groene O; Botje D; Wagner C; Kutaj-Wasikowska H; Kutryba B; Escoval A; Lívio A A; Eiras M; Franca M; Leite I; Almeman F; Kus H; Ozturk K; Mannion R; Arah OA; DerSarkissian M; Thompson CA; Wang A; Thompson A
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87. Chen JL, Wall D, Kennedy C, Unnithan V, Yeh CH: Predictors of increased body mass index in Chinese children. Prog Cardiovasc Nurs; 2007;22(3):138-44
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  • These findings suggest that health care providers need to include the family in children's health care visits and incorporate an assessment of maternal weight status and children's BMI status, activity levels, and aerobic capacity into patient care and education.

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  • (PMID = 17786089.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-7204
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in cardiovascular nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Cardiovasc Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / KL2 RR024130
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Von Tengg-Kobligk H, Weber TF, Rengier F, Kotelis D, Geisbüsch P, Böckler D, Schumacher H, Ley S: Imaging modalities for the thoracic aorta. J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino); 2008 Aug;49(4):429-47
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  • The racy developments not only concerning image acquisition but also image postprocessing offer a multidimensional approach to assess anatomy and pathology of individual patients in a few minutes.
  • Four-dimensional visualization assists us to select the ''adequate'' patient, quantify vascular and adjacent geometries, and select the appropriate device to realize even complex thoracic endovascular aortic reconstructions (TEVAR).
  • Lifelong imaging surveillance of TEVAR and bypasses is still a critical component of patient care and requires comparable imaging and postprocessing capabilities as for the preoperative setting.
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiography, Digital Subtraction. Humans. Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted. Postoperative Care. Preoperative Care. Vascular Surgical Procedures

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  • (PMID = 18665106.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9509
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of cardiovascular surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 107
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89. Nordin M, Cedraschi C, Balagué F, Roux EB: Back schools in prevention of chronicity. Baillieres Clin Rheumatol; 1992 Oct;6(3):685-703
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  • This chapter has reviewed the role of back school and educational programmes for the common and non-specific acute and subacute low back pain patient.
  • Education is an important part of patient care.
  • However, several questions arise about the content of the education, the selection of patients, the patient compliance to instruction given, how the information is retained, and which outcome measures should be used.
  • The information given must be adapted to the needs of the participants and all members of the team must give the same information to the patient.
  • A poorly structured back school where patients are dumped because the physician or other health care provider has nothing else to offer is a poor solution for the patient, a poor solution for the health care provider, and can only increase the patient's discomfort and health care costs.
  • [MeSH-major] Low Back Pain / prevention & control. Patient Education as Topic / methods. Program Development

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  • (PMID = 1477897.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-3579
  • [Journal-full-title] Baillière's clinical rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Baillieres Clin Rheumatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / U60/CCU206153-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Number-of-references] 90
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90. Borne RT, Peterson PN, Greenlee R, Heidenreich PA, Wang Y, Curtis JP, Tzou WS, Varosy PD, Kremers MS, Masoudi FA: Temporal trends in patient characteristics and outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries undergoing primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement in the United States, 2006-2010. Results from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry. Circulation; 2014 Sep 2;130(10):845-53
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  • [Title] Temporal trends in patient characteristics and outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries undergoing primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement in the United States, 2006-2010. Results from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry.
  • We assessed temporal trends in patient characteristics and outcomes among older patients undergoing primary prevention ICD therapy in US hospitals between 2006 and 2010.
  • We used multivariable hierarchical logistic regression to assess temporal trends in outcomes accounting for changes in patient, physician, and hospital characteristics.
  • The cohort included 117 100 patients.
  • Between 2006 and 2010, only modest changes in patient characteristics were noted.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The clinical characteristics of this national population of Medicare patients undergoing primary prevention ICD implantation were stable between 2006 and 2010.
  • Simultaneous improvements in outcomes suggest meaningful advances in the care for this patient population.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Patient Readmission / statistics & numerical data. Retrospective Studies. Stroke Volume / physiology. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. United States / epidemiology

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  • [Copyright] © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.
  • [CommentIn] Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):808-10 [25095883.001]
  • (PMID = 25095884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4539
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circulation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / K08 HS019814-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; implantable cardioverter-defibrillators / outcomes research / quality / registries
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91. Mani V, Wang S, Inci F, De Libero G, Singhal A, Demirci U: Emerging technologies for monitoring drug-resistant tuberculosis at the point-of-care. Adv Drug Deliv Rev; 2014 Nov 30;78:105-17
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  • [Title] Emerging technologies for monitoring drug-resistant tuberculosis at the point-of-care.
  • In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenges to detect drug-resistant TB at the point-of-care (POC).
  • Moreover, we present the latest advances in nano/microscale technologies that can potentially detect TB drug resistance to improve on-site patient care.
  • [MeSH-minor] Early Diagnosis. Humans. Microtechnology / methods. Mycobacterium tuberculosis / drug effects. Mycobacterium tuberculosis / isolation & purification. Nanotechnology / methods. Point-of-Care Systems

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 24882226.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8294
  • [Journal-full-title] Advanced drug delivery reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / R01 A1081534; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI081534; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI093282; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01AI093282; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / U54 EB015408; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / U54EB15408
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antitubercular Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS618523; NLM/ PMC4254374
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Diagnostics / Drug resistance / Nano/microscale technologies / Point-of-care / Tuberculosis
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92. Svirshchevskaya E, Frolova E, Alekseeva L, Kotzareva O, Kurup VP: Intravenous injection of major and cryptic peptide epitopes of ribotoxin, Asp f 1 inhibits T cell response induced by crude Aspergillus fumigatus antigens in mice. Peptides; 2000 Jan;21(1):1-8
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  • Peptide-based immunotherapy may offer an alternative in patient care and management.

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  • (PMID = 10704713.001).
  • [ISSN] 0196-9781
  • [Journal-full-title] Peptides
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Peptides
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI42349
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ASPF1 protein, Aspergillus fumigatus; 0 / Allergens; 0 / Antibodies, Fungal; 0 / Antigens, Fungal; 0 / Antigens, Plant; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Epitopes; 0 / Fungal Proteins; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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93. Cohen DJ, Davis M, Balasubramanian BA, Gunn R, Hall J, deGruy FV 3rd, Peek CJ, Green LA, Stange KC, Pallares C, Levy S, Pollack D, Miller BF: Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care: Consulting, Coordinating and Collaborating Among Professionals. J Am Board Fam Med; 2015 Sep-Oct;28 Suppl 1:S21-31
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  • [Title] Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care: Consulting, Coordinating and Collaborating Among Professionals.
  • PURPOSE: This paper sought to describe how clinicians from different backgrounds interact to deliver integrated behavioral and primary health care, and the contextual factors that shape such interactions.
  • The observed practices were drawn from 2 studies: Advancing Care Together, a demonstration project of 11 practices located in Colorado; and the Integration Workforce Study, consisting of 8 practices located across the United States.
  • RESULTS: Primary care and behavioral health clinicians used 3 interpersonal strategies to work together in integrated settings: consulting, coordinating, and collaborating (3Cs).
  • Consulting occurred when clinicians sought advice, validated care plans, or corroborated perceptions of a patient's needs with another professional.
  • Coordinating involved 2 professionals working in a parallel or in a back-and-forth fashion to achieve a common patient care goal, while delivering care separately.
  • Collaborating involved 2 or more professionals interacting in real time to discuss a patient's presenting symptoms, describe their views on treatment, and jointly develop a care plan.
  • Collaborative behavior emerged when a patient's care or situation was complex or novel.
  • We identified contextual factors shaping use of the 3Cs, including: time to plan patient care, staffing, employing brief therapeutic approaches, proximity of clinical team members, and electronic health record documenting behavior.
  • CONCLUSION: Primary care and behavioral health clinicians, through their interactions, consult, coordinate, and collaborate with each other to solve patients' problems.
  • Organizations can create integrated care environments that support these collaborations and health professions training programs should equip clinicians to execute all 3Cs routinely in practice.

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  • [Copyright] © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.
  • (PMID = 26359469.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-2625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Board Fam Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 1 K12 HS022981 01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Behavioral Medicine / Communication / Delivery of Health Care / Integrated / Interdisciplinary Health Team
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94. Thompson MG, McIntyre AF, Naleway AL, Black C, Kennedy ED, Ball S, Walker DK, Henkle EM, Gaglani MJ: Potential influence of seasonal influenza vaccination requirement versus traditional vaccine promotion strategies on unvaccinated healthcare personnel. Vaccine; 2013 Aug 20;31(37):3915-21
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  • In a prospective cohort study of 1670 healthcare personnel (HCP) providing direct patient care at Scott & White Healthcare in Texas and Kaiser Permanente Northwest in Oregon and Washington, we examined the potential impact of twelve vaccine promotion strategies on the likelihood of being vaccinated.

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • (PMID = 23845807.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2518
  • [Journal-full-title] Vaccine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vaccine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 200-2010-F-33396
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Influenza Vaccines
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Health care personnel / Influenza vaccination / Intervention / Mandate
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95. Apenteng PN, Murray ET, Holder R, Hobbs FD, Fitzmaurice DA, UK GARFIELD Investigators and GARFIELD Steering Committee: An international longitudinal registry of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke (GARFIELD): the UK protocol. BMC Cardiovasc Disord; 2013;13:31
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  • [Title] An international longitudinal registry of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke (GARFIELD): the UK protocol.
  • In practice, many patients with AF do not receive the appropriate antithrombotic therapy and are left either unprotected or inadequately protected against stroke.
  • The purpose of the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD) is to determine the real-life management and outcomes of patients newly diagnosed with non-valvular AF.
  • METHODS/DESIGN: GARFIELD is an observational, international registry of newly diagnosed AF patients with at least one additional investigator-defined risk factor for stroke.
  • The aim is to enrol 55,000 patients at more than 1000 centres in 50 countries worldwide.
  • The UK stands to be a significant contributor to GARFIELD, aiming to enrol 4,582 patients, and reflecting the care environment in which patients with AF are managed.
  • The UK protocol will also focus on better understanding the validity of the two main stroke risk scores (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASC) and the HAS-BLED bleeding risk score, in the context of a diverse patient population.
  • DISCUSSION: The GARFIELD registry will describe how therapeutic strategies, patient care, and clinical outcomes evolve over time.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Great Britain / epidemiology. Guideline Adherence. Hemorrhage / chemically induced. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Middle Aged. Patient Selection. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Practice Patterns, Physicians'. Prospective Studies. Registries. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 23617744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2261
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cardiovascular disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cardiovasc Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT01090362
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3639953
  • [Investigator] Fitzmaurice DA; Murdoch W; Chaunan N; Goodwin D; McManus R; Patel R; Saunders P; Wong B; Evans R; Saunders P; Leese J; Jhittay P; Ross A; Kainth M; Douglas K; Pickavance G; McDonnell J; Williams A; Gooding T; Wagner H; Van Zon G; Jones K; Suryani S; Thomas M; Watson E; Singal A; Wilcock W; Sircar S; Cairns J; Gilliland D; Bilas R; Strieder E; Hutchinson P; Wakeman A; Stokes M; Howitt A; Vishwanathan B; Bird N; Gray D; Evans P; Clark M; Bisatt J; Litchfield J; Fisher E; Fooks T; Kelsall R; Paul N; Alborough E; Aziz M; Ramesh C; Wilson P; Franklin S; Joseph V; Taylor G; Charles H; Molefi-Youri W; Seamark D; Paul C; Richardson M; Jefferies A; Sharp H; Jones H; Giles C; Page M; Oginni O; Aldegather J; Wetherell S; Lumb W; Evans P; Scouller F; Macey N; Rogers S; Stipp Y; West R; Thurston S; Wadeson P; Matthews J; Pandya P; Gallagher A; Priyadharshan R; Oliver J; Railton T; Davies E; Sayers S; Hutton C; Walls N; Thompson R; Sinha B; Butter K; Barrow S; Little H; Russell D; Davies J; Haq I; Ainsworth P; Jones C; Weeks P; Eden J; Kernick D; Glencross J; MacLeod A; Poland K; Mulholland C; Warke A; Conn P; Burns G; Smith R; Lowe S; Kamath R; Fairhead S; Thompson J; Tragen D
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96. Goodlin SJ, Hauptman PJ, Arnold R, Grady K, Hershberger RE, Kutner J, Masoudi F, Spertus J, Dracup K, Cleary JF, Medak R, Crispell K, Piña I, Stuart B, Whitney C, Rector T, Teno J, Renlund DG: Consensus statement: Palliative and supportive care in advanced heart failure. J Card Fail; 2004 Jun;10(3):200-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Consensus statement: Palliative and supportive care in advanced heart failure.
  • BACKGROUND: A consensus conference was convened to define the current state and important gaps in knowledge and needed research on "Palliative and Supportive Care in Advanced Heart Failure."
  • CONCLUSIONS: The conference identified gaps in current knowledge, practice, and research relating to prognostication, symptom management, and supportive care for advanced heart failure (HF).
  • (1) although supportive care should be integrated throughout treatment of patients with advanced HF, data are needed to understand how to best decrease physical and psychosocial burdens of advanced HF and to meet patient and family needs;.
  • (2) prognostication in advanced HF is difficult and data are needed to understand which patients will benefit from which interventions and how best to counsel patients with advanced HF;.
  • (3) research is needed to identify which interventions improve quality of life and best achieve the outcomes desired by patients and family members;.
  • (4) care should be coordinated between sites of care, and barriers to evidence-based practice must be addressed programmatically; and (5) more research is needed to identify the content and technique of communicating prognosis and treatment options with patients with advanced HF; physicians caring for patients with advanced HF must develop skills to better integrate the patient's preferences into the goals of care.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / therapy. Palliative Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Counseling. Decision Making. Health Care Costs. Humans. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Patient Care Team. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 15190529.001).
  • [ISSN] 1071-9164
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiac failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Card. Fail.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / R13 HS13804-01
  • [Publication-type] Consensus Development Conference; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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97. Riley W, Davis S, Miller K, Hansen H, Sainfort F, Sweet R: Didactic and simulation nontechnical skills team training to improve perinatal patient outcomes in a community hospital. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf; 2011 Aug;37(8):357-64
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  • [Title] Didactic and simulation nontechnical skills team training to improve perinatal patient outcomes in a community hospital.
  • BACKGROUND: Birth trauma is a low-frequency, high-severity event, making obstetrics a major challenge for patient safety.
  • Interdisciplinary team training was prospectively evaluated to assess the relative impact of two different learning modalities to improve nontechnical skills (NTS)--the cognitive and interpersonal skills, such as communication and teamwork, that supplement clinical and technical skills and are necessary to ensure safe patient care.
  • This is the first evidence providing a clear association between simulation training and improved patient outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Inservice Training / methods. Patient Care Team / standards. Perinatal Care / standards. Safety Management / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Hospitals, Community. Humans. Interdisciplinary Communication. Patient Simulation. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 21874971.001).
  • [ISSN] 1553-7250
  • [Journal-full-title] Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 1U18HS016728-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Shaw B, Cheater F, Baker R, Gillies C, Hearnshaw H, Flottorp S, Robertson N: Tailored interventions to overcome identified barriers to change: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2005;(3):CD005470
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tailored interventions to overcome identified barriers to change: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes.
  • SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register and pending files until end of December 2002.
  • SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that reported objectively measured professional practice or health care outcomes in which at least one group received an intervention designed (or tailored) to address prospectively identified barriers to change.
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Interventions tailored to prospectively identify barriers may improve care and patient outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) / standards. Professional Practice / standards

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  • [UpdateIn] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(3):CD005470 [20238340.001]
  • (PMID = 16034980.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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99. Schürhoff F, Fond G, Berna F, Bulzacka E, Vilain J, Capdevielle D, Misdrahi D, Leboyer M, Llorca PM, FondaMental Academic Centers of Expertise for Schizophrenia (FACE-SZ) collaborators: A National network of schizophrenia expert centres: An innovative tool to bridge the research-practice gap. Eur Psychiatry; 2015 Sep;30(6):728-35
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  • Schizophrenia is probably the most severe psychiatric disorder with much suffering for the patients and huge costs for the society.
  • Efforts to provide optimal care by general practitioners and psychiatrists are undermined by the complexity of the disorder and difficulties in applying clinical practice guidelines and new research findings to the spectrum of cases seen in day-to-day practice.
  • An innovative model of assessment aimed at improving global care of people with schizophrenia provided by the French national network of schizophrenia expert centres is being described.
  • Each centre has established strong links to local health services and provides support to clinicians in delivering personalized care plans.
  • This network is a great opportunity to improve the global patient care and is conceived as being an infrastructure for research from observational cohort to translational research.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 26072427.001).
  • [ISSN] 1778-3585
  • [Journal-full-title] European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Expert centre / Guideline / Network / Schizophrenia / Translational research
  • [Investigator] Antoniol B; Vila E; Tessier A; Brunel L; Le Gloahec T; Zinetti-Bertschy A; Berna F; Vidailhet P; Danion JM; Offerlin-Meyer I; Boulenger JP; Schandrin A; Yazbek H; Blanc O; Chereau-Boudet I; Tronche AM; Lacelle D; Denizot H; Pires S; D'Amato T; Chesnoy-Servanin G; Rey R; Vehier A; Dorey JM; Urbach M; Passerieux C; Hardy-Bayle MC; Sebilleau M; Fonteneau S; Dubertret C; Le Strat Y; Portalier C; De Pradier M; Lançon C; Faget C; Metairie E; Peri P; Vaillant F; Giraud-Baro E; Delorme C; Fluttaz C; Roman C; Gabayet F; Dubreucq J
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100. Sittig DF, Singh H: A new sociotechnical model for studying health information technology in complex adaptive healthcare systems. Qual Saf Health Care; 2010 Oct;19 Suppl 3:i68-74
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  • People refers to everyone who interacts in some way with the system, from developer to end user, including potential patient-users.
  • Workflow and communication are the processes or steps involved in ensuring that patient care tasks are carried out effectively.

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  • (PMID = 20959322.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-3901
  • [Journal-full-title] Quality & safety in health care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Qual Saf Health Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K23 CA125585; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K23CA125585; United States / NLM NIH HHS / LM / R01-LM006942
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS297306; NLM/ PMC3120130
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