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1. Baldini E, Gardin G, Giannessi PG, Evangelista G, Roncella M, Prochilo T, Collecchi P, Rosso R, Lionetto R, Bruzzi P, Mosca F, Conte PF: Accelerated versus standard cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil or cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil: a randomized phase III trial in locally advanced breast cancer. Ann Oncol; 2003 Feb;14(2):227-32
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  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dose-dense primary chemotherapy on pathological response rate (pCR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) treated with combined modality therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Stage IIIA/IIIB patients received three courses of induction chemotherapy (ICT) with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) followed by local therapy (total mastectomy or segmental mastectomy with axillary nodes dissection) and adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) with three courses of CEF alternated with three courses of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil (CMF).
  • Patients were randomized to receive ICT and ACT every 3 weeks (arm A, 'standard treatment') or every 2 weeks with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) support (arm B, 'dose-dense treatment').
  • Median duration of treatment (ICT+local+ACT) was 183 days (range 0-265) in arm A and 139 days (0-226) in arm B.
  • Median overall survival was 7.8 years in standard therapy: this figure has not yet been reached in the dose-dense treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Mastectomy. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Tamoxifen / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • HSDB. TAMOXIFEN .
  • HSDB. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • HSDB. FLUOROURACIL .
  • HSDB. EPIRUBICIN .
  • HSDB. METHOTREXATE .
  • HSDB. TAMOXIFEN .
  • HSDB. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • HSDB. FLUOROURACIL .
  • HSDB. EPIRUBICIN .
  • HSDB. METHOTREXATE .
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  • (PMID = 12562649.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; CMF regimen; FEC protocol
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2. Hill JS, Kahl SB, Stylli SS, Nakamura Y, Koo MS, Kaye AH: Selective tumor kill of cerebral glioma by photodynamic therapy using a boronated porphyrin photosensitizer. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 1995 Dec 19;92(26):12126-30
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  • [Title] Selective tumor kill of cerebral glioma by photodynamic therapy using a boronated porphyrin photosensitizer.
  • The median survival for primary tumors is < 12 months, with most recurring at the site of the original tumor, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required to eradicate the unresectable "nests" of tumor cells invading into adjacent brain.
  • Two adjuvant therapies with the potential to destroy these cells are porphyrin-sensitized photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron-sensitized boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).
  • The ability of a boronated porphyrin, 2,4-(alpha, beta-dihydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX tetrakiscarborane carboxylate ester (BOPP), to act as a photosensitizing agent was investigated in vitro with the C6 rat glioma cell line and in vivo with C6 cells grown as an intracerebral tumor after implantation into Wistar rats.
  • [MeSH-major] Boron Compounds / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Deuteroporphyrins / therapeutic use. Glioma / drug therapy. Lasers. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Line. Cell Survival / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Hematoporphyrin Derivative / therapeutic use. Humans. Light. Rats. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 8618857.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-8424
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 37961
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2,4-(alpha,beta-dihydroxyethyl)deuteroporphyrin IX tetrakiscarborane carboxylate ester; 0 / Boron Compounds; 0 / Deuteroporphyrins; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 68335-15-9 / Hematoporphyrin Derivative
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC40309
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3. Oliveira-Ferrer L, Wellbrock J, Bartsch U, Penas EM, Hauschild J, Klokow M, Bokemeyer C, Fiedler W, Schuch G: Combination therapy targeting integrins reduces glioblastoma tumor growth through antiangiogenic and direct antitumor activity and leads to activation of the pro-proliferative prolactin pathway. Mol Cancer; 2013;12(1):144
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  • [Title] Combination therapy targeting integrins reduces glioblastoma tumor growth through antiangiogenic and direct antitumor activity and leads to activation of the pro-proliferative prolactin pathway.
  • Microencapsulated PAE-cells producing these inhibitors were applied for local therapy in a subcutaneous glioblastoma model.
  • CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that integrin-targeting factors endostatin and tumstatin act additively by inhibiting glioblastoma growth via reduction of vessel density but also directly by affecting proliferation and viability of tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Integrins / metabolism. Receptors, Prolactin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 24257371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4598
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Autoantigens; 0 / Collagen Type IV; 0 / Endostatins; 0 / Integrins; 0 / Receptors, Prolactin; 0 / type IV collagen alpha3 chain
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4176123
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View summary of articles of this page
13. However, some form of local therapy is appropriate, since the untreated primary may continue to act as a source of metastases.

14. Thus, in order to obtain a prompt improvement, the association of local therapy acting on the genital epithelium to the systemic treatment should be considered.

16. Intravitreal liposomal ODG-PFA may be expected to be a long acting potent local therapy for CMV retinitis.

17. However, there have been no controlled trials demonstrating improved therapeutic outcomes with local therapy and assessing whether biodegradable materials act as a new focus for infection.

23. Systemic administration of exogenous cytokines to act against a tumor at a distant site may not be as successful as more localized therapy in situation.


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4. Friend DR: Review article: issues in oral administration of locally acting glucocorticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther; 1998 Jul;12(7):591-603
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  • [Title] Review article: issues in oral administration of locally acting glucocorticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Inflammatory bowel diseases are treated in some cases by local administration of anti-inflammatory drugs.
  • Local delivery of drugs in the colon following oral administration may lead to improved efficacy/side-effect profiles and may improve patient compliance.
  • This review covers a number of issues important in the design of oral delivery systems of glucocorticosteroids for local therapy of colonic inflammation.
  • These conditions include variations in local pH, transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, the potential role of gut microflora, and drug dissolution in both the healthy and diseased large intestine.
  • [MeSH-major] Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 9701522.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-2813
  • [Journal-full-title] Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 51333-22-3 / Budesonide
  • [Number-of-references] 120
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5. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Body Locations or Regions' associated with 'Big': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; BodyLocationOr;Big:706988790. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/9/3
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  • [Title] 'Body Locations or Regions' associated with 'Big': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Body Location or Region' for 'big'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Body Location or Region'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 40 publications, and group two 786218 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Cooper IF et al: 'Steroids' associated with 'Big Head': Top Publications.
  • Ascer E et al: A large and massive abdominal venous thrombosis associated with the presence of a big axillary mass, lupus-like syndrome and antiphospholipid antibodies.
  • Coquerelle M et al: Short faces, big tongues: developmental origin of the human chin.
  • Warren C: Little pamphlets and big lies: federal authorities respond to childhood lead poisoning, 1935-2003.
  • Wapnir IL et al: Progress on BIG 1-02/IBCSG 27-02/NSABP B-37, a prospective randomized trial evaluating chemotherapy after local therapy for isolated locoregional recurrences of breast cancer.
  • Abdalvand A et al: Matrix metalloproteinase enhances big-endothelin-1 constriction in mesenteric vessels of pregnant rats with reduced uterine blood flow.
  • DeYoung CG et al: Between facets and domains: 10 aspects of the Big Five.
  • Ekehammar B et al: Personality and prejudice: from Big Five personality factors to facets.
  • Soto CJ et al: Development of big five domains and facets in adulthood: mean-level age trends and broadly versus narrowly acting mechanisms.
  • Paunonen SV et al: Big five factors and facets and the prediction of behavior.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 706988790.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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6. Montorsi F, Salonia A, Zanoni M, Pompa P, Cestari A, Guazzoni G, Barbieri L, Rigatti P: Current status of local penile therapy. Int J Impot Res; 2002 Feb;14 Suppl 1:S70-81
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  • [Title] Current status of local penile therapy.
  • Topical therapy has the potential to become a first-line treatment for erectile dysfunction because it acts locally and is easy to use.
  • At this time, however, the crossing of the barrier caused by the penile skin and tunica albuginea has limited the efficacy of the drugs used.
  • [MeSH-major] Erectile Dysfunction / drug therapy. Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11850739.001).
  • [ISSN] 0955-9930
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of impotence research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Impot. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasodilator Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 80
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7. Sousa AM, Franco PA, Ashmawi HA, Posso Ide P: Local effect of tramadol on formalin evoked flinching behavior in rats. Rev Bras Anestesiol; 2008 Jul-Aug;58(4):371-9
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  • [Title] Local effect of tramadol on formalin evoked flinching behavior in rats.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tramadol hydrochloride is known as a centrally acting analgesic drug, used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain.
  • A local analgesic effect has been demonstrated, but its mechanism of action remains unclear.
  • METHODS: In this study, we examined the effect of local, systemic and nerve block tramadol on the nociceptive flinching behavior elicited by injection of 50 microL of 1% formalin into the dorsal region of hind paw of rats.
  • RESULTS: Local tramadol in higher concentrations (2.5 and 5 mg) almost eliminated flinching behavior during the entire test.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tramadol presented a local analgesic effect in formalin nociceptive flinching behavior that is different from its central analgesic effect.
  • This analgesic effect, in this model, seems not to be linked to a local anesthetic like effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Opioid / therapeutic use. Pain / drug therapy. Tramadol / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19378585.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-7094
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista brasileira de anestesiologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Bras Anestesiol
  • [Language] eng; por
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 39J1LGJ30J / Tramadol
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8. Matsuda M, Omata F, Fuwa S, Saida Y, Suzuki S, Uemura M, Ishii N, Iizuka Y, Fukuda K, Fujita Y: Prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated solely with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: risk factors for one-year recurrence and two-year mortality (preliminary data). Intern Med; 2013;52(8):847-53
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  • OBJECTIVE: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an essential therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in whom administering other treatments such as liver transplantation, resection or local therapy is not feasible.
  • A subgroup analysis was performed among 24 patients (Group 2) who underwent complete TACE confirmed with abdominal computed tomography (CT) one month later.
  • RESULTS: The patients in Group 1 (men, 59%), all of whom had liver cirrhosis, underwent TACE as the sole therapy for HCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / mortality. Catheterization, Peripheral. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Liver Neoplasms / mortality. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality

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  • (PMID = 23583987.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7235
  • [Journal-full-title] Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin
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9. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Experimental Models of Diseases' associated with 'Beta Interferon Substance': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; ExperimentalModelOf;BetaInterferonSubstance:707104155. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/5/5
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  • [Title] 'Experimental Models of Diseases' associated with 'Beta Interferon Substance': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Experimental Model of Disease' for 'beta interferon substance'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Experimental Model of Disease'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 26 publications, and group two 871 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Mannie MD et al: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats: IFN-beta acts as a tolerogenic adjuvant for induction of neuroantigen-dependent tolerance.
  • Teige I et al: IFN-beta gene deletion leads to augmented and chronic demyelinating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
  • Touil T et al: Cutting Edge: TLR3 stimulation suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inducing endogenous IFN-beta.
  • Mastronardi FG et al: Attenuation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and nonimmune demyelination by IFN-beta plus vitamin B12: treatment to modify notch-1/sonic hedgehog balance.
  • Matheu V et al: Local therapy with CpG motifs in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation in IFN-beta knock-out mice.
  • Adriaansen J et al: Local delivery of beta interferon using an adeno-associated virus type 5 effectively inhibits adjuvant arthritis in rats.
  • Hallal DE et al: Costimulatory molecule expression on leukocytes from mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis treated with IFN-beta.
  • Schaefer C et al: Gene-based delivery of IFN-beta is efficacious in a murine model of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.
  • Runström A et al: Inhibition of the development of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by laquinimod (ABR-215062) in IFN-beta k.o. and wild type mice.
  • O'Brien K et al: The TLR7 agonist, imiquimod, increases IFN-beta production and reduces the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 707104155.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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10. Schulzeck S, Wulf H: [Local therapy with capsaicin or ASS in chronic pain]. Schmerz; 1997 Oct 24;11(5):345-52
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  • [Title] [Local therapy with capsaicin or ASS in chronic pain].
  • OBJECTIVE: To provide a brief review of the current state of topical treatment with capsaicin or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for therapy of chronic pain syndromes.
  • Because of its effects, it is obvious to try for the therapy of circumscribed neuropathic pain.
  • Capsaicin acts by depleting stores of substance P and other neurotransmitters, resulting in a blockade of a specific group of sensory afferents.
  • Therefore, and because clinical efficacy and advantages over other therapies have not been demonstrated up to now, capsaicin cannot be classified as standard therapy.
  • Therefore, topical ASA therapy for (post)herpetic neuralgia is mainly based on a few enthusiastic case reports rather than on well founded investigations.
  • Furthermore, the discrimination of local from systemic effects, the toxicological profile of longterm topical treatment, and the mechanism of action has not been evaluated.

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  • (PMID = 12799806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0932-433X
  • [Journal-full-title] Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Schmerz
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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11. Antoniu SA: Inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: systemic effects of a local therapy? Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2008 Dec;9(18):3271-3
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  • [Title] Inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: systemic effects of a local therapy?
  • OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the systemic anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled corticosteroids alone or in combination with long acting beta2-agonists.

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  • [CommentOn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Jun 1;177(11):1207-14 [18310480.001]
  • (PMID = 19040347.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7666
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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12. Sudanese A, Avella M, Toni A, Boriani S, Baldini N, Monesi M, Battistini A, Mancini A, Campanacci M: [Therapy of non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (pelvis excluded). Results obtained in 48 cases combining local therapy (radiation and/or surgical) and adjuvant chemotherapy with vincristine, adriamycin, dactinomycin and cyclophosphamide]. Minerva Med; 1987 Apr 15;78(7):473-82
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  • [Title] [Therapy of non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (pelvis excluded). Results obtained in 48 cases combining local therapy (radiation and/or surgical) and adjuvant chemotherapy with vincristine, adriamycin, dactinomycin and cyclophosphamide].
  • [Transliterated title] Terapia del sarcoma di Ewing non metastatico (pelvi esclusa). Risultati ottenuti in 48 casi associando alla terapia locale (radiante e/o chirurgica) una chemioterapia adiuvante con vincristina, adriamicina, dactinomicina e ciclofosfamide.
  • Combined therapy was used on a consecutive series of 48 patients with extrapelvic Ewing's sarcoma at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute.
  • The adjuvant chemotherapy protocol (VCR, ADM, D-ACT, EDX) was identical in all patients whereas local treatment consisted of amputation, resection and radiation treatment or radiation alone.
  • As far as the type of local treatment is concerned, the percentage of local recurrences and metastases was lower when the primary lesion was treated with surgery or surgery combined with radiotherapy, rather than radiation treatment alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Vincristine / administration & dosage


13. deVere White R: Nonsurgical management of patients with stage D1 adenocarcinoma of prostate: risks vs benefits. Urology; 1984 Nov;24(5 Suppl):12-5
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  • Any purely local therapy (e.g., radical prostatectomy) appears to offer little in terms of the risk:benefit ratio.
  • However, some form of local therapy is appropriate, since the untreated primary may continue to act as a source of metastases.
  • 125I implantation with concomitant systemic therapy is an excellent therapeutic option for the majority of these patients.
  • If one accepts the premise that local therapy is of limited value in metastatic disease, systemic treatment at the time of initial diagnosis should be considered.
  • According to the data presented by the Mayo Clinic Group, immediate orchiectomy may be the best form of therapy.
  • An alternative to orchiectomy is estrogen therapy or the more recently introduced GnRH analogues.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 6541825.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-4295
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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14. Palacios S, Castelo-Branco C, Cancelo MJ, Vázquez F: Low-dose, vaginally administered estrogens may enhance local benefits of systemic therapy in the treatment of urogenital atrophy in postmenopausal women on hormone therapy. Maturitas; 2005 Feb 14;50(2):98-104
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  • [Title] Low-dose, vaginally administered estrogens may enhance local benefits of systemic therapy in the treatment of urogenital atrophy in postmenopausal women on hormone therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: When genital atrophy exists, systemic hormone therapy (HT) has a timing until to induce vaginal proliferation and symptomatic relieve.
  • Thus, in order to obtain a prompt improvement, the association of local therapy acting on the genital epithelium to the systemic treatment should be considered.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a combined therapy consisting of vaginal estriol with transdermal 17-beta-estradiol (50 microg/day) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (5 mg/day) per os in shortening the period of uro-genital symptoms.
  • Patients use the local medication daily for the first 3 weeks and twice-weekly thereafter.
  • In the first visit, electible patients after written informed consent were randomized to receive HT plus local estriol or placebo.
  • All the subjects had baseline studies, including medical history, physical examination, blood and urine analysis.
  • In order to evaluate the effect of local treatment on urinary and genital symptoms, a score for genital, urinary and colposcopic complaints (0 minimum-100 maximum) was developed.
  • This score and Blatt-Kuperman were recorded and performed in every control.
  • Additionally, the improvement in urinary symptoms at the end of the study was similar for both groups (from 16.5 +/- 6.1 to 8.5 +/- 2.4 for E group and from 15.8 +/- 7.8 to 8.8 +/- 2.7 for P group; P < 0.01 versus basal); however, those women in group E reached significant improvement on urinary complaints since the first month of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Estriol / therapeutic use. Postmenopause / physiology. Urologic Diseases / drug therapy. Vagina / pathology. Vaginal Diseases / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Administration, Intravaginal. Adult. Atrophy / drug therapy. Colposcopy. Contraceptive Agents, Female / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Estradiol / therapeutic use. Estrogen Replacement Therapy. Female. Humans. Medroxyprogesterone Acetate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Papanicolaou Test. Treatment Outcome. Vaginal Creams, Foams, and Jellies. Vaginal Smears

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  • HSDB. ESTRIOL .
  • HSDB. ESTRADIOL .
  • HSDB. ESTRIOL .
  • HSDB. ESTRADIOL .
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  • (PMID = 15653006.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-5122
  • [Journal-full-title] Maturitas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Maturitas
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contraceptive Agents, Female; 0 / Vaginal Creams, Foams, and Jellies; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; C2QI4IOI2G / Medroxyprogesterone Acetate; FB33469R8E / Estriol
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15. Etienne J, Dorme N, Bourg-Heckly G, Raimbert P, Fékété F: [Local curative treatment of superficial adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. First results of photodynamic therapy with a new photosensitizer]. Bull Acad Natl Med; 2000;184(8):1731-44; discussion 1744-7
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  • [Title] [Local curative treatment of superficial adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. First results of photodynamic therapy with a new photosensitizer].
  • [Transliterated title] Traitement curatif local des adénocarcinomes superficiels sur endobrachyoesophage. Premiers résultats de thérapie photodynamique avec un nouveau photosensibilisateur.
  • Pre-cancerous lesions and mucosally confined superficial cancers can benefit from local therapy given with curative intent due to the absence of near metastatic lymph nodes.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) which acts by laser irradiation with an appropriate wave-length after administration of a photosensitiser retained preferentially by the cancerous tissue can destroy tumour cells selectively, but its efficiency depends upon the photosensitiser.
  • Irradiation time was 12,5 mn.
  • Temoporfin has contributed notably to the field of photodynamic therapy compared to previously used sensitisers.
  • Subject to validation of the method on a greater number of patients, the first results obtained on superficial cancer in Barrett's aesophagus allow us to propose green light Temoporfin PDT as an alternative first line therapy with curative intent.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / etiology. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Barrett Esophagus / complications. Esophageal Neoplasms / etiology. Esophageal Neoplasms / therapy. Mesoporphyrins / therapeutic use. Photochemotherapy / methods. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Precancerous Conditions / etiology. Precancerous Conditions / therapy

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  • (PMID = 11471391.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-4079
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin de l'Académie nationale de médecine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull. Acad. Natl. Med.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mesoporphyrins; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; FU21S769PF / temoporfin
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16. Cheng L, Hostetler KY, Gardner MF, Avila CP Jr, Bergeron-Lynn G, Severson GM, Freeman WR: Intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbits of the foscarnet lipid prodrug: 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphonoformate (ODG-PFA). Curr Eye Res; 1999 Mar;18(3):161-7
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  • The retinal level of the drug was 292 microM at day one, 75 microM at the fifth week and 32 microM at the tenth week, which was still more than ten times higher than the IC90 against HCMV.
  • Intravitreal liposomal ODG-PFA may be expected to be a long acting potent local therapy for CMV retinitis.

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  • (PMID = 10342370.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-3683
  • [Journal-full-title] Current eye research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Eye Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY 11832; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EYO 7366
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphonoformate; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Phospholipid Ethers; 0 / Prodrugs; 364P9RVW4X / Foscarnet
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17. Sealy PI, Nguyen C, Tucci M, Benghuzzi H, Cleary JD: Delivery of antifungal agents using bioactive and nonbioactive bone cements. Ann Pharmacother; 2009 Oct;43(10):1606-15
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  • Antifungal-impregnated cement is sometimes used as adjunctive therapy.
  • Ceramic nonabsorbable impregnated devices must be removed after their lifespan expires and may necessitate another surgical procedure that can increase surgical risk and cost.
  • However, there have been no controlled trials demonstrating improved therapeutic outcomes with local therapy and assessing whether biodegradable materials act as a new focus for infection.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Calcium / blood. Calcium / metabolism. Calcium Phosphates / chemistry. Cattle. Cells, Cultured. Delayed-Action Preparations. Humans. Hydroxyapatites / chemistry. In Vitro Techniques. Osteoblasts / drug effects. Osteoblasts / metabolism. Osteomyelitis / drug therapy. Osteomyelitis / microbiology. Polymethyl Methacrylate / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 19755620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-6270
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Bone Cements; 0 / Calcium Phosphates; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Hydroxyapatites; 0 / beta-tricalcium phosphate; 0 / hydroxyapatite cement; 9011-14-7 / Polymethyl Methacrylate; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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18. Oden ZM, Selvitelli DM, Bouxsein ML: Effect of local density changes on the failure load of the proximal femur. J Orthop Res; 1999 Sep;17(5):661-7
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  • [Title] Effect of local density changes on the failure load of the proximal femur.
  • Presently, all therapies approved for treatment and prevention of osteoporosis involve pharmacological agents that act systemically.
  • In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of preventing osteoporotic hip fractures with local, rather than systemic, therapy.
  • Our hypothesis is that local therapy to increase bone density may be as effective as systemic therapy in reducing fracture risk.
  • Thus, the goal of this investigation was to use finite element analyses to study the effect of a localized increase in bone density on the strength of an osteopenic, human femur.

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  • [CommentIn] J Orthop Res. 2000 Mar;18(2):337 [10815838.001]
  • (PMID = 10569474.001).
  • [ISSN] 0736-0266
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Orthop. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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19. Vokes EE, Panje WR, Weichselbaum RR, Schilsky RL, Moran WJ, Awan AM, Guarnieri CM: Concomitant hydroxyurea, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation therapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: early results. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 1988 Apr;98(4):295-8
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  • [Title] Concomitant hydroxyurea, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation therapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: early results.
  • Both drugs are effective single agents, have shown synergistic activity in vitro, and can act as radiation sensitizers.
  • Sixteen patients have completed their therapy.
  • Eleven patients had recurrent disease after previous therapy with surgery (11 patients), radiotherapy (9 patients), and combination chemotherapy (4 patients).
  • Five patients had not received previous local therapy.
  • Of 15 patients evaluable for response, 9 had complete response, including 5 patients who had earlier local therapy; 5 had partial response; and 1 failed to respond.
  • This regimen has shown impressive activity in a cohort of patients who are not usually responsive to other types of currently available therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Hydroxyurea / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, High-Energy

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  • HSDB. HYDROXYUREA .
  • HSDB. FLUOROURACIL .
  • HSDB. HYDROXYUREA .
  • HSDB. FLUOROURACIL .
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  • (PMID = 3132681.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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20. Babiĭ IaS, Bezhenar AA, Gladkiĭ AV: [Lung study in bronchial asthma using x-ray pneumopolygraphy]. Vrach Delo; 1989 Jan;(1):69-70
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  • Roentgenpneumopolygraphy (RPPG) was used to examine 48 patients with bronchial asthma and all patients showed a reduction of one or several indices of zonal ventilation and/or biomechanics of the respiratory act.
  • But most patients revealed local disorders of ventilation resistant to the effect of broncholytic agents.
  • Local therapy of the corresponding lung regions produced a positive effect.

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  • (PMID = 2718453.001).
  • [ISSN] 0049-6804
  • [Journal-full-title] Vrachebnoe delo
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vrach Delo
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] USSR
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bronchodilator Agents
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21. James PP, Mead GM: Sanctuary site relapse in chemotherapy-treated testicular cancer. Ann Oncol; 1992 Jan;3(1):41-3
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  • The testis and central nervous system (CNS) may act as sanctuary sites for testicular germ cell tumours, as cytotoxic drugs penetrate these areas less well than systemic sites.
  • Two patients were rendered disease-free; one died of progression of his local disease only.
  • Sanctuary site tumour should be considered when relapse occurs in the setting of otherwise chemosensitive disease; local therapy may be curative.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy. Testicular Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / blood. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / secondary. Dysgerminoma / blood. Dysgerminoma / drug therapy. Humans. Male. alpha-Fetoproteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 1376616.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins
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22. Stüttgen G: [Results and consequences of long-term urea therapy for clinical practice]. Hautarzt; 1992;43 Suppl 11:9-12
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  • [Title] [Results and consequences of long-term urea therapy for clinical practice].
  • In the development of clinical symptoms of atopic constitutional neurodermatitis, the application of urea can 1. regulate corneal layer lipids by hydrating the corneal layer and influencing transepidermal water loss, 2. reduce itching via inhibition of tryptic enzymes in the skin and, 3. diminish the susceptibility of the skin to infection by directly acting on the cell membranes of bacteria and fungi.
  • In the present study, the combination of urea and hydrocortisone was used for acute attacks and urea ointment for chronic therapy.
  • Urea therapy in the form of a hydrocortisone-urea ointment represents an effective and low-side effect therapy of this type of chronic dermatosis.
  • Local therapy with other corticosteroids was only reported as necessary in 16% of the cases.
  • In addition to its special properties in the therapy of neurodermatitis, urea also ranks high as a physiological substitution.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatitis, Atopic / drug therapy. Urea / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Drug Combinations. Humans. Hydrocortisone. Ointments. Pruritus / drug therapy. Water Loss, Insensible / drug effects

  • HSDB. HYDROCORTISONE .
  • HSDB. UREA .
  • HSDB. HYDROCORTISONE .
  • HSDB. UREA .
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  • (PMID = 1555945.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-8470
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hautarzt
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Ointments; 8W8T17847W / Urea; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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23. Urushizaki I: [Palliative therapy in cancer. 6. Quality of life and BRM therapy in cancer-patients]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 1990 Oct;17(10):2119-29
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  • [Title] [Palliative therapy in cancer. 6. Quality of life and BRM therapy in cancer-patients].
  • In recent years, various fields of cancer therapy have seen the development and application of treatment modalities which take into account the quality of the patients.
  • Systemic administration of exogenous cytokines to act against a tumor at a distant site may not be as successful as more localized therapy in situation.
  • In most circumstances, cytokines are produced transiently at a local site acting in an autocrine or paracrine manner.
  • So, the local injections of TNF and LAK cells are effective to decrease tumor size without the side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / therapy. Palliative Care. Quality of Life
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Cytokines / blood. Cytokines / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunotherapy, Adoptive

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  • (PMID = 1699499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Immunologic Factors
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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24. Prieur AM: [Drug therapy of inflammatory arthritis in children]. Rev Prat; 1994 Dec 1;44(19):2593-9
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  • [Title] [Drug therapy of inflammatory arthritis in children].
  • [Transliterated title] Traitements médicamenteux des arthrites inflammatoires de l'enfant.
  • Slow acting antirheumatic drugs are mostly used in the polyarticular subtype.
  • Oligoarticular subtype, the long term prognosis of which is fair, is a good indication to local therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Arthritis / drug therapy. Arthritis, Juvenile / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 7855528.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-2640
  • [Journal-full-title] La Revue du praticien
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Prat
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
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25. Frommelt L: Principles of systemic antimicrobial therapy in foreign material associated infection in bone tissue, with special focus on periprosthetic infection. Injury; 2006 May;37 Suppl 2:S87-94
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  • [Title] Principles of systemic antimicrobial therapy in foreign material associated infection in bone tissue, with special focus on periprosthetic infection.
  • Foreign material associated infection in bone tissue is mostly characterized by the features of sessile pathogens acting from the foreign material surface.
  • Therapy is based on surgical revision, with removal of the foreign material and supplementary antimicrobial therapy.
  • Empirical antimicrobial therapy cannot be recommended unless life threatening septicemia occurs.
  • Therefore, antibiotics must be administered in high dosage for an extended period of time.
  • The options of antimicrobial therapy are: 1.
  • 3. Surgical revision with retention of the foreign material and long-term antibiotic therapy including rifampicin: This procedure is possible in early, not yet established foreign material infections.
  • 4. Treatment of the periprosthetic infection: Surgical revision with exchange of the prosthesis combined with systemic (and optional local) therapy, regardless whether the revision is performed in 1 - or multiple-stages.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Infective Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Diseases, Infectious / drug therapy. Postoperative Complications / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Device Removal. Humans. Osteomyelitis / drug therapy. Prostheses and Implants / adverse effects. Prosthesis-Related Infections / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16651077.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-1383
  • [Journal-full-title] Injury
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Injury
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Infective Agents
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26. Spies CM, Burmester GR, Buttgereit F: Analyses of similarities and differences in glucocorticoid therapy between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis - a systematic comparison. Clin Exp Rheumatol; 2009 Jul-Aug;27(4 Suppl 55):S152-8
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  • [Title] Analyses of similarities and differences in glucocorticoid therapy between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis - a systematic comparison.
  • In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), GCs are used systemically at several different dosages and/or local (intraarticular) therapy.
  • In comparison, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are considered to be less responsive to GC therapy than patients with RA, although controlled studies on the effects of low-dose GCs in AS are lacking.
  • In AS, GCs are mainly used for local therapy and occasionally for systemic pulse therapy only.
  • GCs act on primary and secondary immune cells via different mechanisms of action: cytosolic GC receptor (cGCR)-mediated genomic and non-genomic effects, membrane-bound GC receptor (mGCR)-mediated non-genomic effects and - as achieved at very high concentrations - non-specific non-genomic effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antirheumatic Agents / therapeutic use. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Spondylitis, Ankylosing / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Arthrography. Disease Progression. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance / drug effects. Humans. Immune System / cytology. Immune System / drug effects. Injections, Intra-Articular. Pulse Therapy, Drug. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / drug effects. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / metabolism


27. Gratieri T, Pujol-Bello E, Gelfuso GM, de Souza JG, Lopez RF, Kalia YN: Iontophoretic transport kinetics of ketorolac in vitro and in vivo: demonstrating local enhanced topical drug delivery to muscle. Eur J Pharm Biopharm; 2014 Feb;86(2):219-26
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  • [Title] Iontophoretic transport kinetics of ketorolac in vitro and in vivo: demonstrating local enhanced topical drug delivery to muscle.
  • The objective of the study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery kinetics of ketorolac (KT), a highly potent NSAID and peripherally-acting analgesic that is currently indicated to treat moderate to severe acute pain.
  • It was envisaged that, depending on the amounts delivered, transdermal iontophoretic administration might have two distinct therapeutic applications: (i) more effective and faster local therapy with shorter onset times (e.g. to treat trauma-related pain/inflammation in muscle) or (ii) a non-parenteral, gastrointestinal tract sparing approach for systemic pain relief.
  • Subsequent experiments, in male Wistar rats, investigated the local enhancement of KT delivery to muscle by iontophoresis.
  • Iontophoretic administration for 30min was superior to passive topical delivery for 1h and resulted in statistically significant increases in KT levels in the skin (91.04±15.48 vs. 20.16±8.58μg/cm(2)), in the biceps femoris at the treatment site (TM; 6.74±3.80 vs. <LOQ), in the contralateral site (NTM; 1.26±0.54 vs. <LOQ) and in plasma (P; 8.58±2.37μg/ml vs. <LOD).
  • In addition to increasing bioavailability, iontophoretic administration of KT showed clear selectivity for local delivery to the biceps femoris at the treatment site - the TM:NTM ratio was 5.26±1.45, and the TM:P and NTM:P ratios were 0.75±0.32 and 0.14±0.04, respectively.
  • In conclusion, the results demonstrate that iontophoresis of ketorolac enables local enhanced topical delivery to subjacent muscle; this may have clinical application in the treatment of localised inflammation and pain.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Animals. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Humans. Iontophoresis / methods. Kinetics. Male. Pain / drug therapy. Permeability. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Skin / drug effects. Skin / metabolism. Skin Absorption. Swine. Tissue Distribution

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23791718.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-3441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Pharm Biopharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] YZI5105V0L / Ketorolac
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Iontophoresis / Ketorolac / Local enhanced effect / Muscle / NSAID / Topical delivery
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28. Tagawa M, Kawamura K, Ueyama T, Nakamura M, Tada Y, Ma G, Li Q, Suzuki N, Shimada H, Ochiai T: Cancer therapy with local oncolysis and topical cytokine secretion. Front Biosci; 2008;13:2578-87
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  • [Title] Cancer therapy with local oncolysis and topical cytokine secretion.
  • Direct destruction of targeted tumors and subsequent induction of systemic immunity is not pertinent to gene therapy but gene therapy is probably the most suitable therapeutic modality to achieve the local and systemic anti-tumor effects.
  • Current strategies for cancer gene therapy in fact consist of direct inhibition of tumor growth and activation of systemic host defense mechanisms.
  • In this process, dendritic cells play a pivotal role since they act as professional antigen presenting cells and are involved in an initial phase of immune responses, either activation of immunity or induction of immune tolerance.
  • Antigen loading with subsequent appropriate activation of dendritic cells is thereby crucial for activated anti-tumor responses, which possibly eliminate even distant metastatic foci.
  • Combinatory gene therapy with oncolytic viruses and activation of host immune system thereby can evoke immune responses against all the tumor antigens expressed by the process of "antigen-spreading" mechanisms.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviridae / genetics. Cytokines / metabolism. Dendritic Cells / cytology. Gene Transfer Techniques. Genetic Therapy / methods. Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17981735.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-9946
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front. Biosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adenovirus E1A Proteins; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cytokines; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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29. Vokes EE, Panje WR, Schilsky RL, Mick R, Awan AM, Moran WJ, Goldman MD, Tybor AG, Weichselbaum RR: Hydroxyurea, fluorouracil, and concomitant radiotherapy in poor-prognosis head and neck cancer: a phase I-II study. J Clin Oncol; 1989 Jun;7(6):761-8
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  • Both drugs also act as radiosensitizers.
  • Of 15 evaluable patients with recurrent disease after prior local therapy only one failed to respond; six had a complete response (CR), and eight a partial response (PR).
  • Of 17 evaluable patients without prior local therapy, 12 had a CR, with no patient developing recurrence in the irradiated field to date; five patients had a PR.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hydroxyurea / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Bone Marrow / drug effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Evaluation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Stomatitis / etiology

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  • HSDB. FLUOROURACIL .
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  • (PMID = 2715806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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30. Baum M: Biological considerations in the treatment of breast cancer: the "fall out" from clinical trials. Bull Cancer; 1975 Oct-Dec;62(4):391-400
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  • The recognition that host factors exist which may place a constraint on the spread of cancer, and that haematogenous dissemination may occur long before the tumour has reached clinical proportions, has shaken the whole basis upon which "radical" cancer therapy is based.
  • Prospective randomised clinical trials designed to determine the most effective local treatment have incidentally produced biological "fall out" which has thrown additional light on the behaviour and nature of breast cancer.
  • It transpires that untreated mediastinal or axillary lymph nodes appear to have little growth potential of their own, or is it likely that they act as a reservoir for further metastatic dissemination.
  • It is at last becoming accepted that irrespective of the extent of local therapy, the outcome for "early" breast cancer is predetermined by the extent of subclinical distant metastases at the time of presentation.
  • In order to improve the results therefore, some form of adjuvant systemic therapy is essential.
  • A number of clinical trials are at present underway designed to explore the most effective means of controlling minimal residual cancer following local ablation of the tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Clinical Trials as Topic. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Mastectomy. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Research Design

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  • (PMID = 764902.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-4551
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
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31. Dhingra K: Selective estrogen receptor modulation: the search for an ideal hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Cancer Invest; 2001;19(6):649-59
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  • [Title] Selective estrogen receptor modulation: the search for an ideal hormonal therapy for breast cancer.
  • It has been conclusively demonstrated to reduce the risk of relapse following definitive local therapy (and systemic chemotherapy, when indicated) of invasive or noninvasive breast cancer.
  • The ability of tamoxifen to act as an estrogen-agonist or estrogen-antagonist in a tissue-specific fashion has led to the concept of selective estrogen-receptor modulation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Estrogen Receptor Modulators / therapeutic use. Receptors, Estrogen / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 11486708.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Estrogen Receptor Modulators; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; YX9162EO3I / Raloxifene
  • [Number-of-references] 67
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32. Diel IJ: [Therapeutic value of aredia in treatment of breast carcinoma]. Med Klin (Munich); 2000 Oct 15;95 Suppl 2:9-18
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  • THERAPY: There are 2 treatment options--local and systemic.
  • Local therapy includes radiotherapy as well as surgical and orthopedic measures.
  • The 4 pillars of systemic treatment are hormone therapy and chemotherapy, antiresorptive therapy with bisphosphonates and treatment with centrally and/or peripherally acting analgesics.
  • It is therefore all the more important to start appropriate therapeutic measures in good time.
  • Rather than replacing antineoplastic therapy, this class of substances supplements other treatments.
  • Once started, bisphosphonate therapy should be given life-long, even in the event of osseous progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11089382.001).
  • [ISSN] 0723-5003
  • [Journal-full-title] Medizinische Klinik (Munich, Germany : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Klin. (Munich)
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; OYY3447OMC / pamidronate
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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33. Diel IJ, Solomayer EF, Bastert G: Treatment of metastatic bone disease in breast cancer: bisphosphonates. Clin Breast Cancer; 2000 Apr;1(1):43-51
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  • There are two treatment options--local and systemic.
  • Local therapy includes radiotherapy as well as surgical and orthopedic measures.
  • The four pillars of systemic treatment are hormone therapy, chemotherapy, antiresorptive therapy with bisphosphonates, and treatment with centrally and/or peripherally acting analgesics.
  • Rather than replacing antineoplastic therapy, this class of substances supplements other treatments.
  • Once started, bisphosphonate therapy should be given for the remainder of the patient's life, even in the event of osseous progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Non-Narcotic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Fractures, Spontaneous / etiology. Fractures, Spontaneous / prevention & control. Hypercalcemia / etiology. Hypercalcemia / prevention & control. Pain / etiology. Pain / prevention & control


34. Perez-Soler R: Liposomes as carriers of antitumor agents: toward a clinical reality. Cancer Treat Rev; 1989 Jun;16(2):67-82
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  • They also have significant potential for local therapy when administered subcutaneously or intraperitoneally.
  • Although liposomal antitumor agents have no established role in the anticancer armamentarium at this stage, the information available suggests that they may improve the therapeutic index or broaden the applications of available antitumor agents and possibly act as carriers for newly designed liposome-dependent antitumor agents.

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  • (PMID = 2670206.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Liposomes
  • [Number-of-references] 73
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35. Kelly MA, Kurzweil PR, Moskowitz RW: Intra-articular hyaluronans in knee osteoarthritis: rationale and practical considerations. Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ); 2004 Feb;33(2 Suppl):15-22
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  • The rationale for the use of hyaluronans therapeutically is based on observations that hyaluronic acid is an important component of the synovial fluid acting as a cushion and lubricant for the joint and also serving as a major component of the extracellular matrix of the cartilage, helping to enhance the ability of cartilage to resist shear and maintain a resiliency to compression.
  • While intra-articular hyaluronans are indicated at this time only for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis of the knee, there are data to suggest that they may also be useful in treating degenerative disease of other articular joints, as well as have an impact on disease progression.
  • The safety profile of intra-articular hyaluronans is very favorable and, because they are used as a local therapy, there are no known drug interactions-an advantage for patients receiving treatment for comorbid conditions.
  • [MeSH-major] Hyaluronic Acid / administration & dosage. Osteoarthritis, Knee / drug therapy. Pain / drug therapy

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  • HSDB. HYALURONIC ACID .
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  • (PMID = 15005296.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-4519
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J. Orthop.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9004-61-9 / Hyaluronic Acid
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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36. Kornowski R, Hong MK, Tio FO, Choi SK, Bramwell O, Leon MB: A randomized animal study evaluating the efficacies of locally delivered heparin and urokinase for reducing in-stent restenosis. Coron Artery Dis; 1997 May;8(5):293-8
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  • Results from recent nonrandomized studies suggest that local delivery of heparin or urokinase to the site of angioplasty or stenting results in a lower rate of restenosis.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether local delivery of heparin or urokinase reduces in-stent restenosis.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-three pigs were assigned randomly to one of three groups: controls (n = 9) administered local saline infusion, the heparin group (n = 15) administered local heparin (6000 u/10 min), and the urokinase group (n = 9) administered local urokinase (250000 u/10 min), via a local delivery catheter (Dispatch) at the site of subsequent stent implantation.
  • Prior to local delivery, all of the animals were subjected to balloon injury (balloon:artery diameter ratio approximately or = 1.3) to facilitate intramural drug impregnation.
  • After local therapy, one Palmaz-Schatz stent (mean stent: artery diameter ratio approximately or = 1.25) was implanted within the left anterior descending coronary artery.
  • We found no difference in percentage diameter stenosis (46 +/- 18% control, 42 +/- 27% heparin group, and 37 +/- 20% urokinase group, P = 0.7) and corrected neointimal area (1.06 +/- 0.42 mm2 control, 0.94 +/- 0.29 mm2 heparin, and 0.88 +/- 0.26 mm2 urokinase group, P = 0.7) among groups at follow-up.
  • The activated clotting time rose slightly for heparin-treated animals, suggesting that systemic delivery had occurred, whereas fibrinogen levels did not change in urokinase-treated animals.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Local deliveries of heparin and urokinase via the Dispatch catheter, at the chosen dosages, do not reduce in-stent neointimal hyperplasia in this porcine model.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Disease / prevention & control. Coronary Vessels / pathology. Fibrinolytic Agents / administration & dosage. Heparin / administration & dosage. Plasminogen Activators / administration & dosage. Stents. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Constriction, Pathologic. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Hyperplasia / prevention & control. Infusions, Intravenous. Random Allocation. Recurrence. Swine. Tunica Intima / pathology

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  • HSDB. HEPARIN .
  • HSDB. HEPARIN .
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  • (PMID = 9285182.001).
  • [ISSN] 0954-6928
  • [Journal-full-title] Coronary artery disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Coron. Artery Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 9005-49-6 / Heparin; EC 3.4.21.- / Plasminogen Activators; EC 3.4.21.73 / Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
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37. Michaud LB, Valero V, Hortobagyi G: Risks and benefits of taxanes in breast and ovarian cancer. Drug Saf; 2000 Nov;23(5):401-28
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  • They act by binding to tubulin, producing unnaturally stable microtubules and subsequent cell death.
  • The optimal dose of paclitaxel is not known at this time, and controversy over possible dose- or schedule-related differences in efficacy still remain.
  • The combination of paclitaxel and a platinum compound should be utilised as first-line therapy of advanced ovarian cancer.
  • These agents may also be administered intraperitoneally for local therapy of metastatic ovarian cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Taxoids


38. Solignac M: [Assessment of a topical NSAIDs in the treatment of pain and inflammation. The example of Flector Plaster, a local bioadhesive plaster containing diclofenac epolamine]. Presse Med; 2004 Aug 28;33(14 Pt 2):3S10-3
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  • [Title] [Assessment of a topical NSAIDs in the treatment of pain and inflammation. The example of Flector Plaster, a local bioadhesive plaster containing diclofenac epolamine].
  • [Transliterated title] Evaluation d'un anti-inflammatoire non stéroïdien topique dans le traitement de la douleur et de l'inflammation. Exemple de Flector Tissugel 1% dispositif local bioadhésif de diclofénac épolamine.
  • ADVANTAGES AND INCONVENIENCIES OF TRANSDERMAL SYSTEMS: Regarding the advantages, one notes the reduction or even suppression of the gastro-intenstinal disorders related to the oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), the absence of first pass hepatic effect and the better control of the quantities administered of a strong acting drug.
  • FROM AN EXPERIMENTAL POINT OF VIEW: Diclofenac epolamine has demonstrated a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the rat or the rabbit, with transfer following repeated local applications, measurable concentrations in the plasma and adjacent tissues, excellent general tolerance and the safety of the plaster.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / administration & dosage. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Diclofenac / administration & dosage. Diclofenac / analogs & derivatives. Diclofenac / therapeutic use. Inflammation / drug therapy. Pain / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Animals. Ankle Injuries / complications. Ankle Injuries / drug therapy. Athletic Injuries / complications. Athletic Injuries / drug therapy. Humans. Osteoarthritis / complications. Osteoarthritis / drug therapy. Rabbits. Rats. Sprains and Strains

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  • (PMID = 15509042.001).
  • [ISSN] 0755-4982
  • [Journal-full-title] Presse médicale (Paris, France : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Presse Med
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 119623-66-4 / diclofenac hydroxyethylpyrrolidine; 144O8QL0L1 / Diclofenac
  • [Number-of-references] 13
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39. Barbieri E, Emiliani E, Zini G, Mancini A, Toni A, Frezza G, Neri S, Putti C, Babini L: Combined therapy of localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone: analysis of results in 100 patients. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 1990 Nov;19(5):1165-70
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  • [Title] Combined therapy of localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone: analysis of results in 100 patients.
  • One hundred of the 182 patients (72 males, 28 females, median age 15.8 years) with localized disease and no previous treatment were treated with chemotherapy (VCR, ADM, CTX, D-ACT) for 15-18 months.
  • Local treatment was radiotherapy (42 patients), surgery (31 patients), or a combination of both (27 pts).
  • Resected patients tended to have a better local control (Surgery 93.6%, Surgery + Radiation therapy 92.6%, Radiation therapy 69.1%).
  • Disease-free survival was significantly related to the volume of the primary tumor (bulky: 33.2%, not-bulky: 57.7%), to site (extremities 54.6%, central sites 16.6%, other sites 40.9%), and to local treatment (Radiation therapy 30.3%, Surgery + Radiation therapy 47.9%, Surgery 59.1%).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Cobalt Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Infant. Italy / epidemiology. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 2254107.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cobalt Radioisotopes
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40. Saling E, Schreiber M, al-Taie T: A simple, efficient and inexpensive program for preventing prematurity. J Perinat Med; 2001;29(3):199-211
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  • However, as far as basic means are available for the majority--such as basic health care, monitoring the nutritional state of the mothers and acting to prevent infectious diseases (malaria in particular can cause prematurity)--determined prevention of prematurity should take the form of screening and the treatment of disturbances of the vaginal milieu or genital infections.
  • Regular screening for signs of such a disturbance using vaginal pH-measurements (and if necessary further diagnostics and therapy) makes possible the detection of an "early marker" to prevent prematurity in an effective and inexpensive way.
  • Our prematurity-prevention-program, which has been successful for many years, is based on an anamnestic assessment of prematurity risk, the early detection of warning signs (including regular measurement of the vaginal pH) and, if necessary, the appropriate therapeutic measures.
  • In cases of disturbance of the vaginal milieu, the latter consists of a therapy with lactobacillus preparations or in a combination of lactobacillus preparation with an acidifying therapy which may lead to earlier normalization of the vaginal milieu.
  • In cases of bacterial vaginosis local therapy, for example with metronidazol or clindamycin, is undertaken, and in other infections specific treatment.
  • In a prospective study performed in Erfurt the rate of very early premature births (< 32 + 0 gw) amounted to only 0.3% in contrast to 3.3% in a control group who had not taken part in the self-care activity.
  • According to a differentiated classification of the control group the success of the self-care activity was even clearer: In patients who did not take part because their doctors did not support the self-care activity, the rate of very early premature births amounted to 4.1%.
  • To date measurement of the vaginal pH-value was performed intravaginally using either indicator strips or pH-measuring test gloves.
  • A short time ago we developed a panty liner coated with an indicator strip, which enables reading of the pH-value by just checking the indicator on the panty liner.
  • [MeSH-major] Obstetric Labor, Premature / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Abortion, Spontaneous / etiology. Abortion, Spontaneous / prevention & control. Developing Countries. Female. Gestational Age. Humans. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Infant, Newborn. Infant, Premature. Pregnancy. Reagent Strips. Vagina / microbiology. Vagina / secretion. Vaginosis, Bacterial / complications. Vaginosis, Bacterial / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 11447924.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-5577
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of perinatal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Perinat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Reagent Strips
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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41. Angelescu N, Burcoş T, Jitea N, Bărbulescu M, Cristian D, Vlădăreanu M, Mihai C, Mircea N: [The place of surgery in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer]. Chirurgia (Bucur); 1998 Mar-Apr;93(2):81-6
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  • [Transliterated title] Locul chirurgiei în tratamentul cancerului rectal local avansat.
  • We considered as local advanced rectal cancer (LARC) tumours invading the serosa or adherent to neighbouring organs, tumoral fistulas, histopathologically proved invasion of regional lymph nodes, peritoneal carcinomatosis with or without neoplastic ascites.
  • In 27 patients adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy was associated.
  • Surgery is the essential therapeutic act of LARC.

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  • (PMID = 9656595.001).
  • [ISSN] 1221-9118
  • [Journal-full-title] Chirurgia (Bucharest, Romania : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurgia (Bucur)
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ROMANIA
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42. Bulat C, Stoian M, Pădureanu S, Bîşcă L, Blănaru O: [Intraoperative and early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy--adjuvant treatment for locally advanced digestive system cancer]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2004 Apr-Jun;108(2):403-8
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  • [Transliterated title] Chimioterapia intraperitoneală intra şi postoperatorie--tratament adjuvant pentru cancerele digestive local avansate.
  • Simultaneous intraperitoneal chemotherapy with surgical resection, which is continued over the early postoperative period act on the tumor cells which can be mobilized during the surgical dissection.
  • This adjuvant treatment could lead to better control of local recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Digestive System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Lavage. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy

  • HSDB. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
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  • (PMID = 15688822.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Romania
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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43. Norris RL Jr: Local anesthetics. Emerg Med Clin North Am; 1992 Nov;10(4):707-18
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  • [Title] Local anesthetics.
  • Emergency physicians often rely on the use of local anesthetic agents to relieve patient discomfort, and research continues in an effort to develop new agents with improved anesthetic qualities.
  • Eventually, a nontoxic, rapidly acting agent may become available that could provide profound anesthesia of long duration when applied topically to intact skin or wounds.
  • Until the "perfect" agent is developed, physicians can help the patient by making knowledgeable choices regarding local anesthetic techniques.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local. Wounds and Injuries / therapy

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  • (PMID = 1425399.001).
  • [ISSN] 0733-8627
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency medicine clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg. Med. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local
  • [Number-of-references] 95
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44. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Organ or Tissue Functions' associated with 'Carcinoma Of Stomach': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; OrganOrTissue;CarcinomaOfStomach:706957117. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/1/3
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  • [Title] 'Organ or Tissue Functions' associated with 'Carcinoma Of Stomach': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Organ or Tissue Function' for 'carcinoma of stomach'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Organ or Tissue Function'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 26 publications, and group two 9755 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Cao F et al: Lymphangiogenic and angiogenic microvessel density in chinese patients with gastric carcinoma: correlation with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis.
  • Huang Z et al: Aberrant expression of the autocrine motility factor receptor correlates with poor prognosis and promotes metastasis in gastric carcinoma.
  • Hirao S et al: Tumor suppression effect using NK4, a molecule acting as an antagonist of HGF, on human gastric carcinomas.
  • Kobayashi M et al: Influence of percutaneous local therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma on gastric function.
  • Zheng HC et al: Mixed-type gastric carcinomas exhibit more aggressive features and indicate the histogenesis of carcinomas.
  • Iwakiri D et al: Autocrine growth of Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric carcinoma cells mediated by an Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA.
  • Saito H et al: Angiogenesis, angiogenic factor expression and prognosis of gastric carcinoma.
  • Zhao Q et al: [Effect of shenqi fuzheng injection on immune function in gastric carcinoma patients in post-operational and chemotherapeutic period].
  • Alfa-Wali M et al: A case of gastric carcinoma and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).
  • Schraml FV et al: Presentation of gastric carcinoma on a radionuclide gastric-emptying study.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 706957117.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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45. Leunig M, Leunig A, Lankes P, Goetz AE: Evaluation of photodynamic therapy-induced heating of hamster melanoma and its effect on local tumour eradication. Int J Hyperthermia; 1994 Mar-Apr;10(2):297-306
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  • [Title] Evaluation of photodynamic therapy-induced heating of hamster melanoma and its effect on local tumour eradication.
  • To investigate the contribution of hyperthermia on local tumour eradication by photodynamic therapy (PDT) we quantified PDT induced tumour heating and evaluated its biological effect in vivo.
  • The tumoricidally threshold temperature of 43 degrees C was exceeded at 200 mW cm-2 only, revealing a calculated equivalent treatment time at 43 degrees C of about 10 min.
  • Tumours treated by hyperthermia (water bath) at the maximum temperatures measured during illumination at 200 mW cm-2 (45.5 degrees C for 500 s) or animals receiving laser light at 200 mW cm-2 alone showed a significant growth delay compared to controls (p < 0.05), whereas illumination at 100 mW cm-2 alone or hyperthermia corresponding to the maximum temperature obtained at 100 mW cm-2 (39.5 degrees C for 1000 s) did not alter tumour growth.
  • Although a combination of PDT and hyperthermia might act in an additive or synergistic manner, an unrecognized overlap of both effects might complicate the interpretation of studies on the mechanisms of PDT.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematoporphyrin Photoradiation. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy. Cricetinae. Dihematoporphyrin Ether. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Hot Temperature. Hyperthermia, Induced. Male. Mesocricetus

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  • [ErratumIn] Int J Hyperthermia 1994 Nov-Dec;10(6):867
  • (PMID = 8064187.001).
  • [ISSN] 0265-6736
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of hyperthermia : the official journal of European Society for Hyperthermic Oncology, North American Hyperthermia Group
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Hyperthermia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
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46. Pappo I, Tahara H, Robbins PD, Gately MK, Wolf SF, Barnea A, Lotze MT: Administration of systemic or local interleukin-2 enhances the anti-tumor effects of interleukin-12 gene therapy. J Surg Res; 1995 Feb;58(2):218-26
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  • [Title] Administration of systemic or local interleukin-2 enhances the anti-tumor effects of interleukin-12 gene therapy.
  • In the present study the possibility of enhanced anti-tumor activity was examined using a combination of local IL-12 by cytokine gene therapy at the tumor site, combined with systemic or local IL-2 delivery.
  • NIH 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with the genes for both subunits of IL-12, p35 and p40, were used as the source of IL-12 therapy producing 240 HLRU/10(6) cells/48 hr.
  • In the first part of the study the effect of different regimens of systemic IL-2 delivery with local IL-12 administration on the size and growth rate of subcutaneous MCA-105 murine sarcoma was examined.
  • Local IL-12 alone reduced the sizes of tumors after 32 days from 163 to 26.8 mm2 (P < 0.002).
  • Adding the longer-acting polyethylene-glycol-modified IL-2 (PEG IL-2; 30,000 IU) for 5 days prevented the development of tumors in all treated mice compared to 1/3 mice treated with PEG IL-2 alone and 3/6 mice with IL-12, but this was a highly toxic therapy and most of the animals died.
  • Administration of 60,000 IU of IL-2 on Days 1-5 postinoculation of tumor, delivered with IL-12 gene therapy, reduced the tumor growth rate compared to animals treated with IL-2 alone (P < 0.02) or IL-12 (0.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Therapy. Interleukin-12 / genetics. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Neoplasms, Experimental / therapy

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  • (PMID = 7861776.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-2; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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47. Brooks JM, Klepser DG, Urmie JM, Farris KB, Doucette WR: Effect of local competition on the willingness of community pharmacies to supply medication therapy management services. J Health Hum Serv Adm; 2007;30(1):4-27
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  • [Title] Effect of local competition on the willingness of community pharmacies to supply medication therapy management services.
  • The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) provides a prescription drug benefit for Medicare-eligible seniors that includes access to medication therapy management services (MTMS) through pharmacists.
  • We theorize that local community pharmacy market competition affects the decision of individual community pharmacies to provide MTMS.
  • We found that local community pharmacy competition affected the service choices made by the pharmacy decision-makers willing to provide MTMS in a manner consistent with our theory.
  • As a result, patient access to MTMS services depends on both (1) patient access to pharmacies willing to provide MTMS and (2) the level of local community pharmacy competition.

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  • (PMID = 17557694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-3739
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of health and human services administration
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Health Hum Serv Adm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Allen BJ, Corderoy-Buck S, Mallesch JL, Crotty K, Moore DE: Local control of subcutaneous murine melanoma xenografts in nude mice by neutron capture therapy. Melanoma Res; 1992 Nov;2(4):253-62
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  • [Title] Local control of subcutaneous murine melanoma xenografts in nude mice by neutron capture therapy.
  • The boron-10 located in the tumour cells acts as a radiation sensitizer for thermal neutron irradiation.
  • The nude mouse model can be successfully used to demonstrate that regression and local control of melanoma can be achieved by neutron capture therapy.
  • Control is a manifestation of the high linear energy transfer radiation released after neutron capture by boron-10, and does not result from an equal fluence of neutrons alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Melanoma, Experimental / radiotherapy. Neutron Capture Therapy / methods. Skin Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • HSDB. (L)-PHENYLALANINE .
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  • (PMID = 1490113.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-8931
  • [Journal-full-title] Melanoma research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Melanoma Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Boron Compounds; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 47E5O17Y3R / Phenylalanine; UID84303EL / 4-boronophenylalanine
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49. Siró B: [The intraarticular and local administration of glucocorticosteroid preparations]. Orv Hetil; 2009 Feb 8;150(6):251-60
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  • [Title] [The intraarticular and local administration of glucocorticosteroid preparations].
  • The author reports the use of short-acting and combined short + long-acting betamethasone injections for intraarticular and local treatments.
  • In this paper the author describes his experiences with intraarticular and local treatments of 214 patients with 965 short-acting, and 416 patients with 2932 combined short + long-acting betamethasone preparations from 1978 to 2003.
  • AIM: To describe the optimal application of intraarticular and local steroid therapy based on the author's experience and according to the literature data.
  • RESULTS: A combination of intraarticular short-acting + long-acting betamethasone injections resulted in patients being symptom-free (48.8%) or with significant improvement (37.5%), while local application led to a significant improvement (50%) or improvement (29%).
  • Locally applied short-acting betamethasone resulted in symptom-free or significantly improved cases (40.6%), or ordinary improvement (40.3%).
  • The short-acting + long-acting preparation was associated with mild side effects (62 cases), while the short-acting one had fewer mild side effects (10).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Intraarticular application of a combined short-acting + long acting agent is suggested exclusively in cases of visible and laboratory signs of inflammation that are limited to a few joints.
  • Initially, extraarticular management of cases is recommended using mainly short-acting preparations, except in protracted cases or when the application of short-acting steroids prove ineffective.
  • Short-acting agents have little or short-term manifestations of corticosteroid toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Betamethasone / administration & dosage. Glucocorticoids / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Adult. Aged. Arthroscopy / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Injections, Intra-Articular. Male. Middle Aged. Pain / drug therapy. Pain / etiology. Treatment Outcome

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  • HSDB. BETAMETHASONE .
  • HSDB. BETAMETHASONE .
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  • (PMID = 19179257.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 9842X06Q6M / Betamethasone
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50. Tucker GT, Mather LE: Clinical pharmacokinetics of local anaesthetics. Clin Pharmacokinet; 1979 Jul-Aug;4(4):241-78
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  • [Title] Clinical pharmacokinetics of local anaesthetics.
  • The introduction of the new long acting local anaesthetics, bupivacaine and etidocaine, has stimulated an expansion of interest in regional anaesthesia, particularly for obstetrical applications and pain therapy.
  • System toxicity following injection of local anesthetics occurs albeit infrequently, and tentative correlations have been made between the onset of CNS and cardiovascular effects and circulating drug concentrations in both adults and neonates.
  • Amongst other factors, interpretation of these relationships depends upon blood distribution and plasma binding of the agents, sampling sites and acid-base balance.
  • In respect of blood drug concentrations achieved after various regional anaesthetic procedures, the margin of systemic safety appears to favour bupivacaine and etidocaine compared to shorter acting analogues such as lignocaine and mepivacaine.
  • The time course of local anaesthetic remaining at the site of injection has been calculated following intravenous regional anaesthesia and peridural block.
  • This has allowed prediction of the local and systemic accumulation of the drugs following contined dosage.
  • Blood concentrations of local anaesthetics after perineural injection are not closely related to age, weight or pregnancy but may be influenced by diseases associated with haemodynamic changes and by other drugs given at or around the time of regional blockade.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 385208.001).
  • [ISSN] 0312-5963
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical pharmacokinetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Pharmacokinet
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine; B6E06QE59J / Mepivacaine; I6CQM0F31V / Etidocaine; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
  • [Number-of-references] 170
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51. Kamerling SG: Narcotics and local anesthetics. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract; 1993 Dec;9(3):605-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Narcotics and local anesthetics.
  • The recently discovered endogenous opioid peptides (endorphins and enkephalins) appear to play a role in this system, which is activated by stress.
  • Opioids (narcotic analgesics) act to selectively depress pain-sensitive cells.
  • Opioid analgesics may act via multiple opioid receptors.
  • Classical opioids that act at mu (morphine) receptors typically produce analgesia, increased locomotor activity, cardiorespiratory stimulation, and a decrease in intestinal peristalsis in the horse.
  • Opioids that act at kappa receptors produce analgesia, sedation, ataxia, and minimal autonomic effects in the horse.
  • Local anesthetics depress all excitable cells and can diminish sensory, motor, and muscular function.
  • They do not act selectively on pain fibers, although pain is among the first sensations lost following a nerve block.
  • Local anesthetic activity is enhanced by increased extraneuronal pH, nerve cooling, increased nervous activity, coadministration of a vasoconstrictor or hyaluronidase, delayed systemic absorption, prolonged drug metabolism, and by using agents with high lipid solubility.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / therapeutic use. Horse Diseases / drug therapy. Narcotics / therapeutic use. Pain / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 8299018.001).
  • [ISSN] 0749-0739
  • [Journal-full-title] The Veterinary clinics of North America. Equine practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Clin. North Am. Equine Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Narcotics
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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52. Rajah KS: Medical jurisprudence in the local context. Ann Acad Med Singapore; 1987 Apr;16(2):380-6
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  • [Title] Medical jurisprudence in the local context.
  • Medical jurisprudence in the local context would require the examination of a wide area.
  • Where abortion is performed, the question whether the husband has any right to prevent his wife from having a lawful abortion is discussed in the local context.
  • Some thoughts on the medical (therapy, education and research) Act 1972 are expressed in relation to the living body, the corpse and the parts of the human body.

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  • (PMID = 3688820.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-4602
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Acad. Med. Singap.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] SINGAPORE
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53. Zhu L, Pang L, Xu LX: Simultaneous measurements of local tissue temperature and blood perfusion rate in the canine prostate during radio frequency thermal therapy. Biomech Model Mechanobiol; 2005 Aug;4(1):1-9
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  • [Title] Simultaneous measurements of local tissue temperature and blood perfusion rate in the canine prostate during radio frequency thermal therapy.
  • Local tissue temperature and blood perfusion rate were measured simultaneously to study thermoregulation in the canine prostate during transurethral radio-frequency (RF) thermal therapy.
  • Thermistor bead microprobes measured interstitial temperatures and a thermal clearance method measured the prostatic blood perfusion rate under both normal and hyperthermic conditions.
  • Increase in local tissue temperature induced by the RF heating increased blood perfusion throughout the entirety of most prostates.
  • The onset of the initial increase in blood perfusion was sometimes triggered by a temporal temperature gradient at low tissue temperatures.
  • It was found that the temperature elevation in response to the RF heating was closely coupled with local blood flow.
  • The resulting decrease in or stabilization of tissue temperature suggested that blood flow might act as a negative feedback of tissue temperature in a closed control system.
  • Results from this experiment provide insights into the regulation of local perfusion under hyperthermia.
  • The information is important for accurate predictions of temperature during transurethral RF thermal therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Flow Velocity / physiology. Catheter Ablation / methods. Hyperthermia, Induced / methods. Models, Biological. Prostate / physiology. Prostate / surgery. Surgery, Computer-Assisted / methods. Thermography / methods

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  • (PMID = 15940507.001).
  • [ISSN] 1617-7959
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomechanics and modeling in mechanobiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomech Model Mechanobiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5 R29 CA67970-03
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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54. Chatila R, Ferayorni L, Gupta T, Groszmann RJ: Local arterial vasoconstriction induced by octreotide in patients with cirrhosis. Hepatology; 2000 Mar;31(3):572-6
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  • [Title] Local arterial vasoconstriction induced by octreotide in patients with cirrhosis.
  • To investigate whether octreotide produces vasoconstriction through suppression of vasodilatory peptides, such as glucagon, or through a local effect, we evaluated the effect of an intra-arterial dose on forearm blood flow (FBF), while measuring systemic glucagon levels.
  • FBF was measured in both arms during the last minute of each infusion and at the end of washout, with the uninfused arm acting as the control.
  • Nitrates and nitrites, octreotide, and glucagon blood levels were determined at baseline and after each infusion.
  • Saline infusion did not alter FBF, but octreotide infusion resulted in a 34% +/- 7.7 (P <.005) reduction in FBF in the infused arm.
  • FBF in the control arm was unchanged despite a significant decrease in systemic glucagon levels.
  • Octreotide has a local vasoconstrictive effect that seems nitric oxide (NO)-independent.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Cirrhosis / drug therapy. Octreotide / pharmacology. Vasoconstrictor Agents / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Arm. Female. Glucagon / blood. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Male. Methacholine Chloride / pharmacology. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects. Vasoconstriction

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  • (PMID = 10706544.001).
  • [ISSN] 0270-9139
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasoconstrictor Agents; 0W5ETF9M2K / Methacholine Chloride; 9007-92-5 / Glucagon; RWM8CCW8GP / Octreotide
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55. Masuda H, Kim YT, Tyagi S, Chancellor MB, de Miguel F, Yoshimura N: Local effects of antimuscarinics. Urol Clin North Am; 2006 Nov;33(4):511-8, ix-x
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  • [Title] Local effects of antimuscarinics.
  • The most common drug treatments for OAB are antimuscarinic agents that act to increase bladder capacity and decrease the urge to urinate during the storage phase.
  • [MeSH-major] Muscarinic Antagonists / pharmacology. Muscarinic Antagonists / therapeutic use. Urinary Bladder, Overactive / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17011387.001).
  • [ISSN] 0094-0143
  • [Journal-full-title] The Urologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK57267; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK66138; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK68557; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / P01 HD39768
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Muscarinic Antagonists; 0 / Receptors, Muscarinic
  • [Number-of-references] 61
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56. Puzman P, Terl M, Mukensnabl P: [Videothoracoscopy in local anesthesia diagnosis and therapy of pleural effusions]. Vnitr Lek; 2006 Apr;52(4):321-7
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  • [Title] [Videothoracoscopy in local anesthesia diagnosis and therapy of pleural effusions].
  • Up to-September 2005 there were realized 75 videothoracoscopies, all under local anaesthesia with analgosedation and during the spontaneous ventilation.
  • During the exploration it is possible to carry out, besides the collection of bioptic samples from parietal as well as visceral pleura, a whole range of therapeutical acts - evacuation of effusion, mechanical disruption of adhesions in case of empyema with its subsequent drainage or pleurodesis with talc in case of malignant exudates.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthesia, Local. Pleural Effusion / diagnosis. Thoracoscopy. Video Recording
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / diagnosis. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Vnitr Lek. 2006 Apr;52(4):304-5 [16755984.001]
  • (PMID = 16755988.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-773X
  • [Journal-full-title] Vnitr̆ní lékar̆ství
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vnitr Lek
  • [Language] cze
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
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57. Men'shikova IV, Makolkin VI, Sugurova IIu: [Using hyaluronic acid drugs in local intra-articular therapy of osteoarthrosis in the knee joint]. Ter Arkh; 2007;79(5):31-5
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  • [Title] [Using hyaluronic acid drugs in local intra-articular therapy of osteoarthrosis in the knee joint].
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty patients with gonarthrosis of x-ray stage I-III (mean age 65 years, mean duration of the disease < 7 years) on chondroprotectors and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NAD) in a standard dose received a course (3-5 weekly intra-articular injections) of 2 ml injections of ostenil.
  • CONCLUSION: Hyaluronic acid drugs act long, are effective and safe for local intra-articular therapy of gonarthrosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Hyaluronic Acid / therapeutic use. Osteoarthritis, Knee / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17672072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-3660
  • [Journal-full-title] Terapevticheskiĭ arkhiv
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ter. Arkh.
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 9004-61-9 / Hyaluronic Acid
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58. Valle M, Price RW, Nilsson A, Heyes M, Verotta D: CSF quinolinic acid levels are determined by local HIV infection: cross-sectional analysis and modelling of dynamics following antiretroviral therapy. Brain; 2004 May;127(Pt 5):1047-60
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  • [Title] CSF quinolinic acid levels are determined by local HIV infection: cross-sectional analysis and modelling of dynamics following antiretroviral therapy.
  • Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a product of tryptophan metabolism that can act as an endogenous brain excitotoxin when released by activated macrophages.
  • CSF QUIN is putatively one of the important molecular mediators of the brain injury in this clinical setting and, more generally, serves as a marker of local macrophage activation.
  • This study was undertaken to examine the relationship of CSF QUIN concentrations to local HIV infection and to define the effects of antiretroviral drug treatment on CSF QUIN using two complementary approaches.
  • The second involved longitudinal observations of a subset of 20 of these subjects who initiated new antiretroviral therapy regimens.
  • The cross-sectional studies showed strong correlations of CSF QUIN with both CSF HIV RNA and blood QUIN levels, as well as with elevations in CSF white blood cells, CSF total protein and CSF:blood albumin ratio.
  • Kinetic modelling of CSF QUIN decay indicated that CSF QUIN levels were driven primarily by CSF HIV infection with a lesser contribution from blood QUIN levels.
  • CSF QUIN serves as a marker of local infection with a wide dynamic range.
  • The time course of therapy-induced changes links CSF QUIN to local infection and supports the action of antiviral therapy in ameliorating immunopathological brain injury and ADC.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. HIV Infections / cerebrospinal fluid. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV-1. Quinolinic Acid / cerebrospinal fluid
  • [MeSH-minor] AIDS Dementia Complex / cerebrospinal fluid. AIDS Dementia Complex / drug therapy. Adult. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Biological Markers / cerebrospinal fluid. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Viral / blood

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  • (PMID = 15013955.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-8950
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain : a journal of neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 5-M01-RR-00083-36; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI 050587; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH62701; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS37660
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / Biological Markers; 0 / RNA, Viral; F6F0HK1URN / Quinolinic Acid
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59. Adeneye AK, Jegede AS, Mafe MA, Nwokocha EE: Awareness of antimalarial policy and use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria treatment in communities of two selected local government areas of Ogun State, Nigeria. World Health Popul; 2014;15(1):45-60
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  • [Title] Awareness of antimalarial policy and use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria treatment in communities of two selected local government areas of Ogun State, Nigeria.
  • With limited data on the awareness of changes in the use of antimalaria drugs and availability and use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in the context of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) program, we conducted this descriptive cross-sectional study of 262 registered women attending antenatal clinics and 233 mothers of under-five children.
  • We used a questionnaire to assess the awareness, availability and use of ACT in Ijebu North and Yewa North Local Government Areas (LGAs) of Ogun State.
  • Hospital stock records showed inadequate and inconsistent supplies of ACT drugs in hospitals surveyed.
  • Only 23.0% of respondents knew about ACT drugs.
  • About 48% preferred analgesics over ACT drugs (0.6%) for malaria treatment.
  • Lack of awareness was the major reason for non-use of ACT drugs (86.1%).
  • Communities in Yewa North had more supplies of ACT drugs and knew more about ACT than those in Ijebu North.
  • Adequate information on ACT needs to be made available and accessible under a public-private partnership if 2010 RBM targets (now past) and the 2015 Millennium Development Goal (ongoing) for malaria are to be realized in the study communities and Ogun State in general.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimalarials / therapeutic use. Artemisinins / therapeutic use. Awareness. Health Policy. Malaria / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child, Preschool. Cross-Sectional Studies. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Health Services Accessibility. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Nigeria / epidemiology. Pregnancy. Socioeconomic Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.
  • (PMID = 24702765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1718-3340
  • [Journal-full-title] World health & population
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World Health Popul
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimalarials; 0 / Artemisinins; 9RMU91N5K2 / artemisinine
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60. Muller DW, Gordon D, Topol EJ, Levy RJ, Golomb G: Sustained-release local hirulog therapy decreases early thrombosis but not neointimal thickening after arterial stenting. Am Heart J; 1996 Feb;131(2):211-8
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  • [Title] Sustained-release local hirulog therapy decreases early thrombosis but not neointimal thickening after arterial stenting.
  • To determine whether sustained, local delivery of hirulog, a potent antithrombin agent, inhibits thrombus formation and neointimal thickening after arterial stenting, silicone polymers containing hirulog were formulated at a concentration of 5.8% by weight and were tested in vitro to determine the rate of drug release.
  • Hirulog-impregnated silicone polymers were placed around the adventitial surface of one stented segment of each animal and a control polymer was placed contralaterally.
  • Intravenous hirulog (4 mg/kg/hr) was infused for the duration of the procedure to maintain the activated clotting time of > 300 sec.
  • In four pigs killed on days 3 through 5, macroscopic thrombus was very faintly visible on the stent struts of one arterial segment treated with sustained-release hirulog but was readily evident in all control arteries.
  • Histologic analysis showed no difference between hirulog-treated and control sides in the volume of neointima (540 +/- 129 units vs 357 +/- 95 units, p = 0.27) or in the average intima to media ratio (0.44 +/- 0.12 vs 0.34 +/- 0.24, p = 0.47) over the length of the stented segment.
  • Late thrombotic occlusion occurred in two hirulog-treated and two control arteries.
  • In this model, local adventitial hirulog delivery at the dose and delivery rate used may reduce, but does not prevent, thrombus formation and does not reduce the severity of neointimal thickening after carotid stent implantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antithrombins / administration & dosage. Carotid Arteries / pathology. Carotid Artery Thrombosis / prevention & control. Hirudins / analogs & derivatives. Peptide Fragments / administration & dosage. Stents. Tunica Intima / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Delivery Systems / instrumentation. Hirudin Therapy. In Vitro Techniques. Infusions, Intravenous. Microscopy, Electron, Scanning. Recombinant Proteins / administration & dosage. Recombinant Proteins / therapeutic use. Silicone Elastomers. Swine. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 8579010.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-8703
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antithrombins; 0 / Hirudins; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Silicone Elastomers; 128270-60-0 / bivalirudin
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61. Jackson SR, Richelsoph KC, Courtney HS, Wenke JC, Branstetter JG, Bumgardner JD, Haggard WO: Preliminary in vitro evaluation of an adjunctive therapy for extremity wound infection reduction: rapidly resorbing local antibiotic delivery. J Orthop Res; 2009 Jul;27(7):903-8
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  • [Title] Preliminary in vitro evaluation of an adjunctive therapy for extremity wound infection reduction: rapidly resorbing local antibiotic delivery.
  • Current treatments to prevent infection utilize surgical debridement and irrigation, and high doses of systemic antimicrobial therapy.
  • The pellet could be used as an adjunctive therapy at the time of debridement and irrigation to reduce bacterial wound contamination.
  • Small pellets containing a binder and calcium sulfate were engineered to resorb rapidly (within 24 h) and deliver high local doses of antibiotic (amikacin, gentamicin, or vancomycin) to the wound site while minimizing systemic effects.
  • Adjunctive therapy with fast-acting pellets is promising and warrants further in vivo studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacokinetics. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Pseudomonas Infections / drug therapy. Pseudomonas aeruginosa / drug effects. Wounds and Injuries / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Absorbable Implants. Absorption. Calcium Sulfate. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Staphylococcal Infections / drug therapy. Staphylococcus aureus / drug effects. Staphylococcus aureus / growth & development

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  • (PMID = 19105225.001).
  • [ISSN] 1554-527X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Orthop. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; WAT0DDB505 / Calcium Sulfate
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62. Gough MJ, Crittenden MR, Sarff M, Pang P, Seung SK, Vetto JT, Hu HM, Redmond WL, Holland J, Weinberg AD: Adjuvant therapy with agonistic antibodies to CD134 (OX40) increases local control after surgical or radiation therapy of cancer in mice. J Immunother; 2010 Oct;33(8):798-809
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  • [Title] Adjuvant therapy with agonistic antibodies to CD134 (OX40) increases local control after surgical or radiation therapy of cancer in mice.
  • The tumor recurrence from residual local or micrometastatic disease remains a problem in cancer therapy.
  • In patients with soft tissue sarcoma and the patients with inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer, local recurrence is common and significant mortality is caused by the subsequent emergence of metastatic disease.
  • Thus, although the aim of the primary therapy is curative, the outcome may be improved by additional targeting of residual microscopic disease.
  • We display in a murine model that surgical removal of a large primary sarcoma results in local recurrence in approximately 50% of animals.
  • Depletion of CD8 T cells results in local recurrence in 100% of animals, indicating that these cells are involved in the control of residual disease.
  • We further show that systemic adjuvant administration of αOX40 at surgery eliminates local recurrences.
  • In this model, αOX40 acts to directly enhance tumor antigen-specific CD8 T-cell proliferation in the lymph node draining the surgical site, and results in increased tumor antigen-specific cytotoxicity in vivo.
  • These results are also corroborated in a murine model of hypofractionated radiation therapy of lung cancer.
  • We conclude that αOX40 increases tumor antigen-specific CD8 T-cell cytotoxic activity resulting in improved endogenous immune control of residual microscopic disease, and we propose that adjuvant αOX40 administration may be a valuable addition to surgical and radiation therapy for cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / metabolism. Immunotherapy. Sarcoma / immunology. Sarcoma / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / immunology. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic / drug effects. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Transgenic. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Radiotherapy. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell / genetics. Receptors, OX40 / agonists. Receptors, OX40 / immunology

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  • (PMID = 20842057.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4513
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md. : 1997)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA102577; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA122701; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA102577; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA102577-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA122701
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell; 0 / Receptors, OX40
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS230919; NLM/ PMC3563298
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63. Bizer VA, Khmelevskaia ZI, Boĭko IN: [Combined treatment of patients with osteogenic sarcoma using local UHF-hyperthermia]. Ortop Travmatol Protez; 1989 Jul;(7):28-30
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  • [Title] [Combined treatment of patients with osteogenic sarcoma using local UHF-hyperthermia].
  • The results are analysed according to the method of treatment in 3 groups of the patients who had been administered different total focus doses acting on the tumour.
  • Besides chemical and radial therapy and surgical treatment local UHF-hyperthermia was used as a modifier in the complex of therapeutic measures.
  • It has been demonstrated that the use of local UHF-hyperthermia does not increase the risk of metastatic spreading, allows to reduce the radiation dose and by influencing the primary tumour contributes to better treatment results.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Hyperthermia, Induced. Osteosarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Radioisotope Teletherapy

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  • (PMID = 2812736.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-5987
  • [Journal-full-title] Ortopediia travmatologiia i protezirovanie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ortop Travmatol Protez
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] USSR
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic
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64. Mathies H: [The therapy of pain in rheumatic joint-and spine diseases.]. Schmerz; 1990 Sep;4(3):130-7
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  • [Title] [The therapy of pain in rheumatic joint-and spine diseases.].
  • The therapy of pain caused by rheumatic diseases above all must take into consideration the cause of the pain.
  • The so-called disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs do not influence the inflammation or consequently, the pain directly, but rather through mechanisms before the local joint process some of which are not exactly known.
  • Therefore, physical and especially gymnastic therapy play a major role.
  • If there is pressure on the ligaments and, in cases of vertebral dislocation with overstraining of the vertebral joints, therapy with local injections is indicated.
  • Moreover, fluoride also acts as an analgesic once the osteoporosis has stabilized.
  • In most cases fibromyalgia, which is mostly of a psychosomatic nature, cannot be influenced by medical therapy.

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  • (PMID = 18415250.001).
  • [ISSN] 0932-433X
  • [Journal-full-title] Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Schmerz
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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65. 'Local Anesthetic Epc': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review CN; ;LocalAnestheticEpc:709703599. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2015/3/7; updates online.
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  • [Title] 'Local Anesthetic Epc': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'local anesthetic epc'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 2579 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Nasehi A et al: Clinical pain evaluation with intraoral vibration device during local anesthetic injections.
  • Kamel I et al: Intralipid therapy for inadvertent peripheral nervous system blockade resulting from local anesthetic overdose.
  • Aghdashi MM et al: Vertical infraclavicular block with local anesthetic injections at different currents.
  • Adoni A et al: Prospective randomized comparison between ultrasound-guided saphenous nerve block within and distal to the adductor canal with low volume of local anesthetic.
  • Shin S et al: Ultrasound visibility of spinal structures and local anesthetic spread in children undergoing caudal block.
  • Cooper IF et al: 'Intellectual Products' associated with 'Application Of Local Anesthetic': Top Publications.
  • Cooper IF et al: 'Manufactured Objects' associated with 'Application Of Local Anesthetic': Top Publications.
  • Al-Kahtani A: Effect of long acting local anesthetic on postoperative pain in teeth with irreversible pulpitis: Randomized clinical trial.
  • Silva de Melo NF et al: Development of hydrophilic nanocarriers for the charged form of the local anesthetic articaine.
  • Turabekova MA et al: Aconitum and delphinium diterpenoid alkaloids of local anesthetic activity: comparative QSAR analysis based on GA-MLRA/PLS and optimal descriptors approach.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2015 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 709703599.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review CN
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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66. Görtz G: [Local antiseptic and anti-endotoxin measures in intra-abdominal infections]. Langenbecks Arch Chir; 1997;382(4 Suppl 1):S37-41
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  • [Title] [Local antiseptic and anti-endotoxin measures in intra-abdominal infections].
  • With standardized operating strategies, a lethality rate of 10.2% was achieved following intra-abdominal administration of taurolidine in 352 cases of severe intra-abdominal infection.
  • The extent and type of antibacterial therapy were determined on the basis of the clinical severity, the patient's age, and the original site of the infection.
  • Local antisepsis includes tactical surgery and the use of locally and systemically acting taurolidine.
  • Antibiotics were used for systemic antibacterial therapy.
  • After laparoscopical clearance of the focus of infection (appendix, gall bladder) the operating time was significantly extended compared with that required for open surgery, while the postoperative complication rate and the length of stay in hospital were significantly reduced.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Drainage. Female. Humans. Laparoscopy. Male. Middle Aged. Reoperation. Survival Analysis

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  • HSDB. 1-VINYL-2-PYRROLIDINONE POLYMER W/IODINE .
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  • (PMID = 9333706.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-8236
  • [Journal-full-title] Langenbecks Archiv für Chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Langenbecks Arch Chir
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Endotoxins; 25655-41-8 / Povidone-Iodine
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67. Yau TM, Kim SC: Local anaesthetics as hypoxic radiosensitizers, oxic radioprotectors and potentiators of hyperthermic killing in mammalian cells. Br J Radiol; 1980 Jul;53(631):687-92
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  • [Title] Local anaesthetics as hypoxic radiosensitizers, oxic radioprotectors and potentiators of hyperthermic killing in mammalian cells.
  • Local anaesthetics with well-known pharmacology are found to radiosensitize hypoxic and radioprotect oxic murine L5178Y cells.
  • Under the specified experimental conditions, radiation-modifying effects exerted by local anaesthetics are dose-dependent.
  • It appears that in order that the drugs should act as oxic radioprotectors or as hypoxic radio-sensitizers, the agent must be present during the period of irradiation.
  • Local anaesthetics are also found to potentiate the hyperthermic killing of cells.
  • The possibility of applying compounds with such dual radiation-modifying properties plus hyperthermia-potentiating capacity to enhance the therapeutic gains in tumour therapy is briefly discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / pharmacology. Hot Temperature. Leukemia L5178 / pathology. Leukemia, Experimental / pathology. Radiation-Protective Agents. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents

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  • (PMID = 7426891.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1285
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA15901; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA19283
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Radiation-Protective Agents; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 4Z8Y51M438 / Procaine; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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68. Konrad CJ, Schuepfer GK, Neuburger M, Schley M, Schmelz M, Schmeck J: Reduction of pulmonary edema by short-acting local anesthetics. Reg Anesth Pain Med; 2006 May-Jun;31(3):254-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reduction of pulmonary edema by short-acting local anesthetics.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Local anesthetics (LAs) possess a variety of effects that cannot be explained by the typical block of neuronal sodium channels.
  • Antithrombotic effects of LAs are well known, but LAs also act as bactericides.
  • RESULTS: Pretreatment with LAs significantly reduced the FMLP-induced PAP increase (treatment group v sham group: 0.5 to 5 mm Hg v 8 mm Hg; P < .05) and the release of endothelin-1 (2.4 v 5 fmol/mL).
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / pharmacology. Lung / drug effects. Pulmonary Artery / drug effects. Pulmonary Edema / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure. Disease Models, Animal. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Granulocytes / drug effects. Granulocytes / pathology. In Vitro Techniques. Lidocaine / pharmacology. Lidocaine / therapeutic use. Mepivacaine / pharmacology. Mepivacaine / therapeutic use. N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine. Organ Size. Pneumonia / chemically induced. Pneumonia / drug therapy. Pneumonia / pathology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16701192.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-7339
  • [Journal-full-title] Regional anesthesia and pain medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reg Anesth Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 59880-97-6 / N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine; B6E06QE59J / Mepivacaine
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69. Erb C: [Pleiotropic effects in local drug treatment for glaucoma]. Klin Monbl Augenheilkd; 2013 Feb;230(2):141-5
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  • [Title] [Pleiotropic effects in local drug treatment for glaucoma].
  • Therefore pleiotropic effects of medications, defined as positively acting effects independent of the main mechanism of action, represent a new research sub-field in medical therapy and play an increasingly important role in internal medicine.
  • Using the example of local beta-blockers, alpha-2-agonists, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and prostaglandin analogues, their pleiotropic spectra will be shown and discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / administration & dosage. Dinoprost / administration & dosage. Dinoprost / analogs & derivatives. Glaucoma / drug therapy. Intraocular Pressure / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists / administration & dosage. Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists / adverse effects. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / administration & dosage. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / adverse effects. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors / adverse effects. Drug Combinations. Guideline Adherence. Humans. Ophthalmic Solutions. Optic Nerve Diseases / prevention & control

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  • [Copyright] Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.
  • (PMID = 23430678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-3999
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Monbl Augenheilkd
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists; 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Ophthalmic Solutions; B7IN85G1HY / Dinoprost
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70. Melik Z, Cankar K: Diazepam augments gender differences in cutaneous LD flux response to local cooling. Life Sci; 2005 May 13;76(26):3015-28
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  • [Title] Diazepam augments gender differences in cutaneous LD flux response to local cooling.
  • Cutaneous vasoconstriction in response to local cooling is normally greater in females than in males.
  • Besides these effects they decrease sympathetic output and as it was shown in the last decade they act synergistically with alpha-adrenoceptors.
  • We measured laser-Doppler blood flux changes provoked by local cooling before and after oral application of a low dose of diazepam (5 mg) in 9 healthy males and in 11 healthy females with regular menstrual cycles.
  • The results of our experiments show that in females there is a significant reduction (ANOVA, p < 0.05) in laser-Doppler flux during the first four minutes of cooling after taking of diazepam.
  • Our results suggest that diazepam, in addition to its well-known effect on BZ receptors may also interact with alpha2C-adrenoceptors in the vessel wall during local cooling.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Hemodynamics / drug effects. Hemodynamics / physiology. Humans. Male. Microcirculation / drug effects. Prazosin / pharmacology. Regional Blood Flow. Sex Factors. Yohimbine / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 15850595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-3205
  • [Journal-full-title] Life sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Life Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Muscle Relaxants, Central; 2Y49VWD90Q / Yohimbine; Q3JTX2Q7TU / Diazepam; XM03YJ541D / Prazosin
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71. Karasek M, Bogduk N: Temporary neurologic deficit after cervical transforaminal injection of local anesthetic. Pain Med; 2004 Jun;5(2):202-5
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  • [Title] Temporary neurologic deficit after cervical transforaminal injection of local anesthetic.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the effects of spinal cord block after injection of local anesthetic into a cervical radicular artery.
  • RESULTS: After the injection of local anesthetic, the patient developed quadriplegia.
  • Whereas local anesthetic, so injected, appears to have only a temporary effect on spinal cord function, particulate steroids may act as an embolus and cause permanent impairment.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / adverse effects. Lidocaine / adverse effects. Pain, Intractable / drug therapy. Quadriplegia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 15209975.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-2375
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine
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72. Donati D, Yin J, Di Bella C, Colangeli M, Bacci G, Ferrari S, Bertoni F, Barbieri E, Mercuri M: Local and distant control in non-metastatic pelvic Ewing's sarcoma patients. J Surg Oncol; 2007 Jul 1;96(1):19-25
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  • [Title] Local and distant control in non-metastatic pelvic Ewing's sarcoma patients.
  • The purpose of this study was to review our experience and evaluate the role of different local treatment in non-metastatic pelvic ES patients.
  • RESULTS: Patients treated with surgery, with or without radiation therapy, had a better local control (82.6% vs. 66.7%) and a significantly higher rate of 5-year EFS (73.9% vs. 30.3%, P = 0.036) than those who were only treated with local radiation therapy.
  • Radiotherapy after surgery as a rescue method might not act effectively, while preoperative radiotherapy was associated with good clinical response and should be recommended.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Pelvic Bones. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Ilium. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Analysis. Vincristine / administration & dosage


73. Pässler R, Nossek H: [The concentration and duration of the action of metronidazole in the gingival pocket following local application]. Zahn Mund Kieferheilkd Zentralbl; 1989;77(1):12-6
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  • [Title] [The concentration and duration of the action of metronidazole in the gingival pocket following local application].
  • The local application presents itself useful for the indicated medicamentous therapy of periodontitis by means of metronidazole.
  • In preliminary tests the metronidazole liberation from hollow fibres, in gel and from polyvinyl alcohol platelets has been tested by ultraviolet absorption measurement.
  • The hollow fibres have been evaluated no more because of too small agent absorption in the clinical test.
  • In polyvinyl alcohol metronidazole acts definitely over 3 days.
  • [MeSH-major] Gingival Pocket / drug therapy. Gingivitis / drug therapy. Metronidazole / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Delayed-Action Preparations. Drug Evaluation. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Gels. Gingiva / metabolism. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Polyvinyl Alcohol. Time Factors

  • HSDB. METRONIDAZOLE .
  • HSDB. POLYVINYL ALCOHOL .
  • HSDB. METRONIDAZOLE .
  • HSDB. POLYVINYL ALCOHOL .
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  • (PMID = 2526423.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-6464
  • [Journal-full-title] Zahn-, Mund-, und Kieferheilkunde mit Zentralblatt
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zahn Mund Kieferheilkd Zentralbl
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY, EAST
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Gels; 140QMO216E / Metronidazole; 9002-89-5 / Polyvinyl Alcohol
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74. Gracies JM, Elovic E, McGuire J, Simpson DM: Traditional pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Part I: Local treatments. Muscle Nerve Suppl; 1997;6:S61-91
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  • [Title] Traditional pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Part I: Local treatments.
  • Pharmacologic treatment should be an adjunct to muscle lengthening and training of antagonists.
  • Localized muscle overactivity of specific muscle groups is often seen in a number of common pathologies, including stroke and traumatic brain injury.
  • In these cases, we favor the use of local treatments in those muscles where overactivity is most disabling, by injection into muscle (neuromuscular block) or close to the nerve supplying the muscle (perineural block).
  • Two types of local agents have been used in addition to the newly emerged botulinum toxin: local anesthetics (lidocaine and congeners), with a fully reversible action of short duration, and alcohols (ethanol and phenol), with a longer duration of action.
  • Local anesthetics block both afferent and efferent messages.
  • When a long-lasting blocking agent is being considered, we favor the use of transient blocks with local anesthetics for therapeutic tests or diagnostic procedures to answer the following questions: Can function be improved by the block?
  • A short-acting anesthetic can also serve as preparation to casting or as an analgesic for intramuscular injections of other antispastic treatment.
  • Side effects are numerous and include pain during injection, chronic dysesthesia and chronic pain, and episodes of local or regional vascular complications by vessel toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / therapeutic use. Muscle Spasticity / drug therapy. Neuromuscular Diseases / drug therapy. Parasympatholytics / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 9826983.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Muscle & nerve. Supplement
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Muscle Nerve Suppl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Parasympatholytics
  • [Number-of-references] 149
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75. Schreiber S, Gross S, Brandis A, Harmelin A, Rosenbach-Belkin V, Scherz A, Salomon Y: Local photodynamic therapy (PDT) of rat C6 glioma xenografts with Pd-bacteriopheophorbide leads to decreased metastases and increase of animal cure compared with surgery. Int J Cancer; 2002 May 10;99(2):279-85
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  • [Title] Local photodynamic therapy (PDT) of rat C6 glioma xenografts with Pd-bacteriopheophorbide leads to decreased metastases and increase of animal cure compared with surgery.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT), locally applied to solid C6 rat glioma tumors in the foot of CD1 nude mice, eradicated the primary tumor and also decreased the rate of groin and lung metastases.
  • This protocol and the surgical amputation of the leg were compared for local and metastasis responses.
  • Whereas local tumor control rates were up to 64% following PDT, in surgically treated animals, local tumor control was absolute.
  • These findings suggest that local PDT with Pd-Bpheid, which acts primarily on the tumor vasculature, efficiently eradicates the solid C6 tumors.
  • In addition, the local PDT of the primary lesion has beneficial therapeutic effects on remote C6 metastasis, which is not obtained with surgery.
  • Pd-Bpheid-PDT may thus offer a potentially superior curative therapy for C6 glioma tumors in the limb by eradicating the target tumor and by reducing the rate of metastasis in the groin and lung, possibly due to innate immunity.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacteriochlorophylls / therapeutic use. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / surgery. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Groin. Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Rats. Transplantation, Heterologous. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11979445.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacteriochlorophylls; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / palladium-bacteriopheophorbide
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76. Conti RJ, Shinder M: Soft tissue calcifications induced by local corticosteroid injection. J Foot Surg; 1991 Jan-Feb;30(1):34-7
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  • [Title] Soft tissue calcifications induced by local corticosteroid injection.
  • The authors discuss soft tissue calcifications as a possible effect of local corticosteroid therapy.
  • The accumulation of insoluable steroid acts as a foreign body and induced a chronic granulomatous inflammatory process, with subsequent dystrophic calcification.

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  • (PMID = 2002185.001).
  • [ISSN] 0449-2544
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of foot surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Foot Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 5611-51-8 / triamcinolone hexacetonide; F446C597KA / Triamcinolone Acetonide
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77. Matejka M, Nell A, Kment G, Schein A, Leukauf M, Porteder H, Mailath G, Sinzinger H: Local benefit of prostaglandin E2 in radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 1990 Apr;28(2):89-91
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  • [Title] Local benefit of prostaglandin E2 in radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.
  • In 15 patients suffering from maxillofacial cancer with radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis the local application of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) tablets, 0.5 mg four times a day at a 4-h interval was performed.
  • It is claimed that for this particular indication, PGE2 is a potent locally acting compound without affecting circulating levels.
  • [MeSH-major] Dinoprostone / therapeutic use. Mouth Mucosa / radiation effects. Stomatitis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Analysis of Variance. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 2337569.001).
  • [ISSN] 0266-4356
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of oral & maxillofacial surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] SCOTLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] K7Q1JQR04M / Dinoprostone
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78. Tobin GW, Brocklehurst JC: The management of urinary incontinence in local authority residential homes for the elderly. Age Ageing; 1986 Sep;15(5):292-8
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  • [Title] The management of urinary incontinence in local authority residential homes for the elderly.
  • Urinary incontinence occurring at least once weekly was found in 32% of residents in 30 Local Authority Residential Homes for the Elderly.
  • A further 104 incontinent residents were selected to act as controls (control group).
  • There was a reduction in daytime incontinence in 40% of the study group, but this was matched by a reduction in 29% of the control group and the difference was not significant.
  • The reduction in nocturnal incontinence in 41% of the treatment group was significantly different from 23% of the control group (P = 0.016).
  • [MeSH-major] Homes for the Aged. Urinary Incontinence / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Circadian Rhythm. Female. Humans. Male. Time Factors. Urinary Bladder Diseases / diagnosis. Urodynamics

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  • (PMID = 3776752.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-0729
  • [Journal-full-title] Age and ageing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Age Ageing
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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79. Tsukamoto Y: [New Developments in CKD-MBD. How to "Thinking Global! Acting Local" for treating CKD-MBD]. Clin Calcium; 2014 Dec;24(12):1757-61
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  • [Title] [New Developments in CKD-MBD. How to "Thinking Global! Acting Local" for treating CKD-MBD].
  • Acting Local" has been used to express a principle in implementing global guidelines in local.
  • In case of KDIGO 2009 CKD-MBD guideline, Japanese Society of Dialysis Therapy followed the principal part of its global one and published 2012 CKD-MBD guideline for Japanese users.
  • Is it a right recommendation as for "Acting Local" ?

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  • (PMID = 25423919.001).
  • [ISSN] 0917-5857
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical calcium
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Calcium
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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80. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Social Behaviors' associated with 'Local Area': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; SocialBehavior;LocalArea:706601212. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/8/29
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  • [Title] 'Social Behaviors' associated with 'Local Area': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Social Behavior' for 'local area'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Social Behavior'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 19 publications, and group two 24008 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Kyffin RG et al: Mortality rates and self reported health: database analysis by English local authority area.
  • Nakano T: Home care medicine with interdisciplinary approach at the local community -Challenge to create the model for co-operation between medical and long-term care at under-populated area in Tosashimizu City-.
  • True M et al: Collaborative efforts for successful local area networks.
  • Marhic ME et al: Selective broadcast interconnection: a novel scheme for fiber-optic local-area networks.
  • Philibert MD et al: Associations between disability prevalence and local-area characteristics in a general community-living population.
  • McDermott WR et al: Optimization of wide-area ATM and local-area ethernet/FDDI network configurations for high-speed telemedicine communications employing NASA's ACTS.
  • Murray AG: A game theory based framework for assessing incentives for local area collaboration with an application to Scottish salmon farming.
  • Gade-Kristensen H et al: [Practical cooperation concerning drug therapy in a local area. The drug committee in the primary sector in Holstebro].
  • Zhang JG et al: All-optical code-division-multiplexing technique supporting multirate data communications and local-area-network interconnections.
  • Ebong RD: Female circumcision and its health implications: a study of the Uruan Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 706601212.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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81. Nazarenko NA, Khodasevich LS: [Effect of acetylsalicylic and mefenamic acids on cytoarchitectonic of skin in rats with acute local cryogenic trauma]. Eksp Klin Farmakol; 2003 Sep-Oct;66(5):45-7
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  • [Title] [Effect of acetylsalicylic and mefenamic acids on cytoarchitectonic of skin in rats with acute local cryogenic trauma].
  • The effect of acetylsalicylic (250 mg/kg) and mephenamic (50 mg/kg) acids on the process of skin cytoarchitectonics restoration was studied in rats with acute local cryogenic traumas induced by acting with a stream of ethyl chloride upon epilated back skin area (1.5 cm2).
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Aspirin / therapeutic use. Frostbite / drug therapy. Mefenamic Acid / therapeutic use. Skin / drug effects. Wound Healing / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Male. Rats

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  • HSDB. ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID .
  • HSDB. MEFENAMIC ACID .
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  • HSDB. MEFENAMIC ACID .
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  • (PMID = 14650215.001).
  • [ISSN] 0869-2092
  • [Journal-full-title] Eksperimental'naia i klinicheskaia farmakologiia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eksp Klin Farmakol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 367589PJ2C / Mefenamic Acid; R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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82. Vaajanen A, Vapaatalo H: Local ocular renin-angiotensin system - a target for glaucoma therapy? Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol; 2011 Oct;109(4):217-24
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  • [Title] Local ocular renin-angiotensin system - a target for glaucoma therapy?
  • An active local intraocular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has recently been shown to exist in the human eye, and evidence is now accumulating that antihypertensive drugs acting on RAS can also lower intraocular pressure.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiotensin II / metabolism. Antihypertensive Agents / pharmacology. Glaucoma / drug therapy. Intraocular Pressure / physiology. Renin-Angiotensin System / physiology

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  • [Copyright] © 2011 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2011 Nordic Pharmacological Society.
  • (PMID = 21599836.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-7843
  • [Journal-full-title] Basic & clinical pharmacology & toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 11128-99-7 / Angiotensin II
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83. Giese A, Kucinski T, Knopp U, Goldbrunner R, Hamel W, Mehdorn HM, Tonn JC, Hilt D, Westphal M: Pattern of recurrence following local chemotherapy with biodegradable carmustine (BCNU) implants in patients with glioblastoma. J Neurooncol; 2004 Feb;66(3):351-60
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  • [Title] Pattern of recurrence following local chemotherapy with biodegradable carmustine (BCNU) implants in patients with glioblastoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: Recently a randomized placebo-controlled phase III trial of biodegradable polymers containing carmustine has demonstrated a significant survival benefit for patients treated with local chemotherapy.
  • A local chemotherapy applied directly to the resection cavity may act directly on residual tumor cells in adjacent brain possibly leading to a local control of the tumor and increased survival.
  • However, the median survival (14.7 versus 9.5 months; P = 0.007) and the time to neurological deterioration (12.9 +/- 4.85 vs. 9.4 +/- 2.73 months; P = 0.035) was significantly longer in the treatment group versus the placebo treated control.
  • Within the carmustine treated group 8 patients showed a local treatment failure with recurrent tumors immediately adjacent to the resection cavity or progression form a residual tumor.
  • Three patients showed a multifocal distant and local pattern of failure after complete or subtotal removal.
  • In no case the local chemotherapy resulted in a distant recurrence only.
  • However, the time to radiographic progression was 165.1 +/- 80.75 days for the GLIADEL Wafer group and 101.9 +/- 43.06 days for the placebo group (P = 0.023).
  • CONCLUSION: In this subgroup analysis of a phase III trial population both the clinical progression and radiological progression were significantly delayed in patients treated with local chemotherapy, resulting in an increased survival time.
  • Local chemotherapy with carmustine containing wafer implants did not result in an altered pattern of recurrence and did not promote multifocal patterns of recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carmustine / therapeutic use. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15015668.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Drug Implants; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine
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84. Guo G, Kan M, Martinez JA, Zochodne DW: Local insulin and the rapid regrowth of diabetic epidermal axons. Neurobiol Dis; 2011 Aug;43(2):414-21
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  • [Title] Local insulin and the rapid regrowth of diabetic epidermal axons.
  • In particular, the unique trophic properties of insulin, acting on sensory neuron and axon receptors offer an approach toward reversing loss of skin axons that develops during diabetes.
  • Here we examined how local cutaneous insulin, acting on axon receptors, influences innervation of the epidermis.
  • In separate models of experimental diabetes, we identified a surprising and rapid local response of this axon population to insulin.
  • Local hindpaw plantar injections of low dose subhypoglycemic insulin (that did not alter diabetic hyperglycemia) and carrier (into the opposite paw) were given over two days and innervation studied at 5 days.
  • Local direct insulin signaling of receptors expressed on diabetic cutaneous axons may reverse retraction of their branches during experimental DPN.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / drug therapy. Diabetic Neuropathies / drug therapy. Epidermis / innervation. Insulin / physiology. Nerve Regeneration / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21530660.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-953X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurobiology of disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurobiol. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Insulin; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Insulin
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85. Sudoh Y, Cahoon EE, Gerner P, Wang GK: Tricyclic antidepressants as long-acting local anesthetics. Pain; 2003 May;103(1-2):49-55
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  • [Title] Tricyclic antidepressants as long-acting local anesthetics.
  • Recent studies showed that amitriptyline is more potent in blocking the sciatic nerve functions in vivo by local injection than bupivacaine, a long-acting local anesthetic.
  • We therefore tested whether various TCAs could likewise act as local anesthetics in vivo after single injection via the rat sciatic notch.
  • The duration of complete sciatic nerve blockade by TCAs and the time to reach full recovery were measured with neurobehavioral assays and compared with results from bupivacaine.
  • Thus, TCAs have very different efficacy as local anesthetics in vivo.
  • We suggest that the ability of TCAs to pass through various membrane barriers within peripheral nerve trunks is crucial to their local anesthetic efficacy in vivo.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / pharmacology. Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic / pharmacology. Sciatic Nerve / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Amines / chemistry. Amines / classification. Animals. Cell Line. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxepin / pharmacology. Doxepin / therapeutic use. Electric Impedance. Embryo, Mammalian. Humans. Kidney / drug effects. Male. Membrane Potentials / drug effects. Motor Activity / drug effects. Neurologic Examination / drug effects. Nortriptyline / pharmacology. Nortriptyline / therapeutic use. Pain / drug therapy. Pain Measurement / methods. Patch-Clamp Techniques. Proprioception / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Recovery of Function / drug effects. Substance-Related Disorders. Time Factors. Transfection / methods

  • HSDB. DOXEPIN .
  • HSDB. NORTRIPTYLINE .
  • HSDB. DOXEPIN .
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  • (PMID = 12749958.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3959
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM35401; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM48090
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amines; 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic; 1668-19-5 / Doxepin; BL03SY4LXB / Nortriptyline
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86. Schmaldienst S, Goldammer A, Spitzauer S, Derfler K, Hörl WH, Knöbl P: Local anticoagulation of the extracorporeal circuit with heparin and subsequent neutralization with protamine during immunoadsorption. Am J Kidney Dis; 2000 Sep;36(3):490-7
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  • [Title] Local anticoagulation of the extracorporeal circuit with heparin and subsequent neutralization with protamine during immunoadsorption.
  • A regimen of local anticoagulation of an immunoadsorption device was studied.
  • Sufficient anticoagulation of the extracorporeal circuit was obtained (activated partial thromboplastin time [APTT] > 180 seconds; thrombin time [TT] > 120 seconds; anti-Xa activity, 1.05 +/- 0.21 U/mL) during the entire treatment of 190 minutes, whereas coagulation parameters in the patients' blood stayed within the normal range.
  • In a control group without heparin neutralization, full systemic anticoagulation of the patients occurred (APTT, 157.8 +/- 30.6 seconds; TT, 119.8 +/- 0.4 seconds; anti-Xa activity, 0.88 +/- 0.21 U/mL).
  • No side effects or clotting of the system were observed.
  • Our data show that this regimen of local anticoagulation is a safe protocol for extracorporeal circulation without exposing the patients to anticoagulants.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticoagulants / pharmacology. Blood Coagulation / drug effects. Blood Component Removal / instrumentation. Extracorporeal Circulation / instrumentation. Hypercholesterolemia / therapy. Immune System Diseases / therapy. Immunosorbent Techniques / instrumentation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Calcium Gluconate / administration & dosage. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Lipoproteins, LDL / blood. Male. Partial Thromboplastin Time. Prospective Studies. Protamines / administration & dosage. Thrombin Time


87. Jonas JB, Hemmerling TM, Budde WM, Dinkel M: Postoperative analgesia by reinjections of local anesthetic through an indwelling retrobulbar catheter. Am J Ophthalmol; 2000 Jan;129(1):54-8
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  • [Title] Postoperative analgesia by reinjections of local anesthetic through an indwelling retrobulbar catheter.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate an indwelling retrobulbar catheter for repeatable postoperative retrobulbar injections of local anesthetics for titratable analgesia after intraocular surgery.
  • METHODS: The prospective study included all 124 patients (124 eyes) who consecutively underwent retinal or cyclocryocoagulation (n = 22), pars plana vitrectomy, or retinal detachment surgery (n = 102), and who were operated on by the same surgeon with local anesthesia within a period of 12 months.
  • Through the same needle, a 28-gauge commercially available flexible catheter was introduced into the retrobulbar space, the needle was withdrawn, and the catheter was fixed in place.
  • When the patients started to feel pain after surgery, 2 ml of mepivacaine 2% or 2 ml of bupivacaine 0.75% were reinjected through the catheter.
  • The catheter was removed 24 to 72 hours after surgery.
  • Removal of the catheter after surgery was unremarkable.
  • CONCLUSIONS: An indwelling retrobulbar catheter for repeatable postoperative injection of short-acting local anesthetics is useful and effective for titratable postoperative analgesia after intraocular surgery, and it allows patients to avoid the side effects of systemic analgesics and sedatives.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesia / methods. Anesthesia, Local / methods. Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Catheters, Indwelling. Pain, Postoperative / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 10653413.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9394
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Ophthalmol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; B6E06QE59J / Mepivacaine; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
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88. Jozwiak J, Dhein S: Local effects and mechanisms of antiarrhythmic peptide AAP10 in acute regional myocardial ischemia: electrophysiological and molecular findings. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol; 2008 Nov;378(5):459-70
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  • [Title] Local effects and mechanisms of antiarrhythmic peptide AAP10 in acute regional myocardial ischemia: electrophysiological and molecular findings.
  • Now, we wanted to elucidate whether AAP10 acts preferably in the ischemic area and the molecular mechanism of this peptide.
  • Seventeen rabbit hearts were isolated, perfused according to Langendorff, and submitted to 30-min local ischemia by LAD occlusion with/without AAP10 (50 nM).
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / pharmacology. Connexin 43 / drug effects. Myocardial Ischemia / drug therapy. Oligopeptides / pharmacology


89. Gutiérrez JM, León G, Rojas G, Lomonte B, Rucavado A, Chaves F: Neutralization of local tissue damage induced by Bothrops asper (terciopelo) snake venom. Toxicon; 1998 Nov;36(11):1529-38
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  • [Title] Neutralization of local tissue damage induced by Bothrops asper (terciopelo) snake venom.
  • Local tissue damage represents a serious consequence of Bothrops asper envenomations.
  • Despite differences in their pharmacokinetic profiles, equine whole IgG and F(ab')2 antivenoms show similar efficacy in the neutralization of edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis induced by B. asper venom, suggesting that the use of antivenoms made of antibody fragments may not improve neutralization of these effects.
  • In addition, the rapid administration of antivenoms with high antibody titers against locally-acting toxins is very important in the treatment of these effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antivenins / therapeutic use. Crotalid Venoms / toxicity. Snake Bites / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bothrops. Edema / etiology. Edema / therapy. Forecasting. Immunoglobulin E / therapeutic use. Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments / therapeutic use. Immunotherapy / trends. Mice

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  • (PMID = 9792169.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-0101
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicon
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antivenins; 0 / Crotalid Venoms; 0 / Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments; 37341-29-0 / Immunoglobulin E
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90. Khairuddin N, Blake SJ, Firdaus F, Steptoe RJ, Behlke MA, Hertzog PJ, McMillan NA: In vivo comparison of local versus systemic delivery of immunostimulating siRNA in HPV-driven tumours. Immunol Cell Biol; 2014 Feb;92(2):156-63
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  • [Title] In vivo comparison of local versus systemic delivery of immunostimulating siRNA in HPV-driven tumours.
  • Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to inhibit oncogene expression and also to activate innate immune responses via Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition have been shown to be beneficial as anti-cancer therapy in certain cancer models.
  • In this study, we investigated the effects of local versus systemic delivery of such immune-stimulating Dicer-substrate siRNAs (IS-DsiRNAs) on a human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven tumour model.
  • Localized siRNA delivery using intratumour injection of siRNA was able to increase siRNA delivery to the tumour compared with intravenous (IV) delivery and potently activated innate immune responses.
  • Although IS-DsiRNAs activated innate immune cells and required interferon-α (IFNα) for full effect on tumour growth, we found that potent silencing siRNA acting independently of IFNα were overall more effective at inhibiting TC-1 tumour growth.
  • Other published work utilising IS-siRNAs have been carried out on tumour models with low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class 1, a target of natural killer cells that are potently activated by IS-siRNA.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / pharmacology. Alphapapillomavirus / immunology. Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy. RNA, Small Interfering / pharmacology. Tumor Virus Infections / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 24217808.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1711
  • [Journal-full-title] Immunology and cell biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Immunol. Cell Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class I; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering
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91. Zinck K, Marmion S: Global focus, local acts: providing mental health services to indigenous people. Arch Psychiatr Nurs; 2011 Oct;25(5):311-9
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  • [Title] Global focus, local acts: providing mental health services to indigenous people.
  • We contend that changes in availability of mental health services to indigenous peoples across the globe can be initiated with local actions by professionals who serve this population.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Services, Indigenous / standards. Mental Disorders / ethnology. Mental Disorders / therapy. Population Groups / psychology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21978799.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8228
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of psychiatric nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Psychiatr Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Paglia DN, Wey A, Park AG, Breitbart EA, Mehta SK, Bogden JD, Kemp FW, Benevenia J, O'Connor JP, Lin SS: The effects of local vanadium treatment on angiogenesis and chondrogenesis during fracture healing. J Orthop Res; 2012 Dec;30(12):1971-8
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  • [Title] The effects of local vanadium treatment on angiogenesis and chondrogenesis during fracture healing.
  • This study quantified the effects of local intramedullary delivery of an organic vanadium salt, which may act as an insulin-mimetic on fracture healing.
  • Using a BB Wistar rat femoral fracture model, local vanadyl acetylacetonate (VAC) was delivered to the fracture site and histomorphometry, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry were performed.
  • Callus percent cartilage was 200% higher at day 7 (p < 0.05) and 88% higher at day 10 (p < 0.05) in the animals treated with 1.5 mg/kg of VAC.
  • Callus percent mineralized tissue was 37% higher at day 14 (p < 0.05) and 31% higher at day 21 (p < 0.05) in the animals treated with 1.5 mg/kg of VAC.
  • Maximum torque to failure was 104% and 154% higher at 4 weeks post-fracture (p < 0.05) for the healing femurs from the VAC-treated (1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg) animals.
  • Animals treated with other VAC doses demonstrated increased mechanical parameters at 4 weeks (p < 0.05).
  • Immunohistochemistry detected 62% more proliferating cells at days 7 (p < 0.05) and 94% more at day 10 (p < 0.05) in the animals treated with 1.5 mg/kg VAC.
  • Results showed 100% more vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) positive cells and 80% more blood vessels at day 7 (p < 0.05) within the callus subperiosteal region of VAC-treated animals (1.5 mg/kg) compared to controls.
  • The results suggest that local VAC treatment affects chondrogenesis and angiogenesis within the first 7-10 days post-fracture, which leads to enhanced mineralized tissue formation and accelerated fracture repair as early as 3-4 weeks post-fracture.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bone and Bones / metabolism. Cell Proliferation. Femoral Fractures / therapy. Immunohistochemistry / methods. Insulin / metabolism. Male. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Regeneration. Stress, Mechanical. Torque

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.
  • (PMID = 22653614.001).
  • [ISSN] 1554-527X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Orthop. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydroxybutyrates; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Pentanones; 00J9J9XKDE / Vanadium; 17272-66-1 / acetyl acetonate
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93. Willcox ML, Burton S, Oyweka R, Namyalo R, Challand S, Lindsey K: Evaluation and pharmacovigilance of projects promoting cultivation and local use of Artemisia annua for malaria. Malar J; 2011;10:84
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  • [Title] Evaluation and pharmacovigilance of projects promoting cultivation and local use of Artemisia annua for malaria.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Local cultivation and preparation of A. annua are feasible where growing conditions are appropriate.
  • Where ACT is in short supply, it would make sense to save it for young children, while using A. annua infusions to treat older patients who are at lower risk.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimalarials / therapeutic use. Artemisia annua. Artemisinins / therapeutic use. Malaria / drug therapy. Phytotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Female. Humans. Kenya. Plant Preparations / adverse effects. Plant Preparations / therapeutic use. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic / drug therapy. Questionnaires. Uganda

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  • (PMID = 21481234.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2875
  • [Journal-full-title] Malaria journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Malar. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimalarials; 0 / Artemisinins; 0 / Plant Preparations
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3098208
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94. Brassel F: [Possibilities and limits of local intra-arterial fibrinolysis in thromboembolic vascular occlusions of the central nervous system]. Z Gesamte Inn Med; 1993 Jun-Jul;48(6-7):351-5
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  • [Title] [Possibilities and limits of local intra-arterial fibrinolysis in thromboembolic vascular occlusions of the central nervous system].
  • Short acting fibrinolytic agents such as urokinase and rt-PA are ideally suited for local intraarterial fibrinolysis (LIF) of thromboembolism in cerebral arteries.
  • Despite high dosages (1,000,000-2,000,000 I.U. urokinase/hr), the risk of symptomatic haemorrhage is relatively low if therapy is started within 4-5 hours of the onset of symptoms and is administered only for a short time (1-2 hrs).
  • If therapy is promptly started within 4-5 hours of the clinical onset of symptoms, a favourable clinical course may result even in patients with internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusions.
  • Results of studies to date have shown that the immediate intraarterial fibrinolysis of the acutely occluded central retinal artery is by far superior to conservative therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibrinolytic Agents / administration & dosage. Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis / drug therapy. Thrombolytic Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cerebral Angiography. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Retinal Artery Occlusion / drug therapy. Retinal Artery Occlusion / radiography

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  • (PMID = 8333232.001).
  • [ISSN] 0044-2542
  • [Journal-full-title] Zeitschrift für die gesamte innere Medizin und ihre Grenzgebiete
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Z Gesamte Inn Med
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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95. Bollag U: Utilization of local first aiders in the provision of health care for prisoners by the International Committee of the Red Cross in Nicaragua. J Community Health; 1985;10(1):17-21
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  • [Title] Utilization of local first aiders in the provision of health care for prisoners by the International Committee of the Red Cross in Nicaragua.
  • The results of a time study and the preliminary collection of morbidity data in rural prisons of Nicaragua prompted the medical delegate of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to outline an assistance program based on three principles: (a) that the system be in line with the projects of the national health agencies;.
  • (b) that locally recruited and trained health workers become the primary directors of health care in prisons; and (c) that the medical delegate of the ICRC act as advisor to the local health workers.
  • [MeSH-minor] Health Services Needs and Demand. Humans. Nicaragua. Prisons. Sexually Transmitted Diseases / drug therapy. Time and Motion Studies. Tuberculosis / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 3839513.001).
  • [ISSN] 0094-5145
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of community health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Community Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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96. Shrestha S, Gracias NG, Mujenda F, Khodorova A, Vasko MR, Strichartz GR: Local antinociception induced by endothelin-1 in the hairy skin of the rat's back. J Pain; 2009 Jul;10(7):702-14
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  • [Title] Local antinociception induced by endothelin-1 in the hairy skin of the rat's back.
  • Concentrations of 1 to 50 microM ET-1 (in 0.05 mL) depress the local nocifensive response to noxious tactile probing at the injection site with von Frey filaments for 30 to 180 minutes; distant injections have no effect at this site, showing that the response is local.
  • Local subcutaneous injection of epinephrine (45 microM) also causes antinociception through alpha-1 adrenoreceptors, but such receptors are not involved in the ET-1-induced effect.
  • Both epinephrine and ET-1, at antinociceptive concentrations, reduce blood flow in the skin; the effect from ET-1 is largely prevented by subcutaneous nimodipine.
  • PERSPECTIVE: The pain-inducing effects of ET-1 have been well documented in glabrous skin of the rat, a frequently used test site.
  • The opposite behavioral effect, antinociception, occurs from ET-1 in hairy skin and is correlated with a reduction in blood flow.
  • Vasoactive effects are important in assessing mechanisms of peripherally acting agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Non-Narcotic / therapeutic use. Endothelin-1 / therapeutic use. Pain / drug therapy. Skin / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic alpha-Agonists / pharmacology. Animals. Calcium Channel Blockers / pharmacology. Calcium Channels, L-Type / metabolism. Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists. Endothelin B Receptor Antagonists. Epinephrine / pharmacology. Hair. Male. Narcotic Antagonists. Nimodipine / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Receptor, Endothelin A / metabolism. Receptors, Opioid / metabolism. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects. Tachyphylaxis

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  • (PMID = 19559389.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-8447
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / C06 RR015481- 01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA08053; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / NS048565; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA080153; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA080153-09
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-Agonists; 0 / Analgesics, Non-Narcotic; 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; 0 / Calcium Channels, L-Type; 0 / Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Endothelin B Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Endothelin-1; 0 / Narcotic Antagonists; 0 / Receptor, Endothelin A; 0 / Receptors, Opioid; 57WA9QZ5WH / Nimodipine; YKH834O4BH / Epinephrine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS130464; NLM/ PMC2720057
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97. Bahmer FA: [Significance of local factors for the development of contact allergic reactions in patients with chronic venous insufficiency]. Z Hautkr; 1987 Dec 1;62(23):1662-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Significance of local factors for the development of contact allergic reactions in patients with chronic venous insufficiency].
  • There are a number of local factors which might contribute to the induction and persistence of contact allergies in patients with chronic venous insufficiency of the lower leg and their sequelae such as stasis dermatitis and leg ulcers.
  • Furthermore, the density of epidermal Langerhans' cells is increased in areas of stasis dermatitis, and the dermis contains a high number of cells bearing HLA-DR antigens, which might act as antigen-presenting cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Eruptions / etiology. Varicose Ulcer / drug therapy. Venous Insufficiency / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 2964133.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0481
  • [Journal-full-title] Zeitschrift für Hautkrankheiten
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Z. Hautkr.
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY, WEST
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98. Leone S, Di Cianni S, Casati A, Fanelli G: Pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical use of new long acting local anesthetics, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine. Acta Biomed; 2008 Aug;79(2):92-105
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical use of new long acting local anesthetics, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine.
  • Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine, two new long-acting local anesthetics, have been developed as an alternative to bupivacaine, after the evidence of its severe toxicity.
  • By examining randomised, controlled trials that have compared these three local agents, this review supports the evidence that both levobupivacaine and ropivacaine have a clinical profile similar to that of racemic bupivacaine, and that the minimal differences reported between the three anesthetics are mainly related to the slightly different anesthetic potency, with racemic bupivacaine > levobupivacaine > ropivacaine.
  • [MeSH-major] Amides. Anesthetics, Local. Bupivacaine

  • ResearchGate. author profiles.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
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  • (PMID = 18788503.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-4203
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Biomed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amides; 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 7IO5LYA57N / ropivacaine; A5H73K9U3W / levobupivacaine; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
  • [Number-of-references] 102
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99. Cooper BR, Moll T, Griffiths JR: Local anaesthetic toxicity: are we prepared for the consequences in the Emergency Department? Emerg Med J; 2010 Aug;27(8):599-602
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Local anaesthetic toxicity: are we prepared for the consequences in the Emergency Department?
  • BACKGROUND: Local anaesthetic agents are commonly encountered in the Emergency Department (ED).
  • Local anaesthetic toxicity leading to cardiorespiratory arrest is a rare, but potentially fatal, complication of an overdose of these agents.
  • A recent innovation in the treatment of severe local anaesthetic toxicity has been the introduction of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy (Intralipid 20%).
  • The aim of this study was to gauge the current level of knowledge surrounding the administration and complications associated with commonly used local anaesthetic agents.
  • METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed amongst the training grade doctors working in four Emergency Departments.
  • In addition, only one out of 30 in the CT/F2 group were aware of lipid emulsion therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Those using local anaesthetic should also be able to recognise the signs and symptoms of toxicity should this occur and act accordingly.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthesiology / education. Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Clinical Competence. Emergency Service, Hospital / standards. Lidocaine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Education, Medical, Continuing. Great Britain. Heart Arrest / chemically induced. Heart Arrest / therapy. Humans. Internship and Residency. Medical Staff, Hospital. Prescription Drug Misuse. Questionnaires

  • HSDB. LIDOCAINE .
  • HSDB. LIDOCAINE .
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  • (PMID = 20688937.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-0213
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency medicine journal : EMJ
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine
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100. Herrmann KS, Kreuzer H: Effect of serotonergic antagonism on local responses to an acute and selective endothelial trauma in vivo. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol; 1990;16 Suppl 3:S40-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of serotonergic antagonism on local responses to an acute and selective endothelial trauma in vivo.
  • In a hamster cheek pouch, vessels form a rich meshwork, allowing repetitive experiments to obtain intraindividual control measurements.
  • Regularly platelets and the coagulation system are activated and thrombi are formed.
  • In larger arterial vessels local vasoconstriction occurs.
  • It was monitored by the continuous measurement of blood cell velocity to assess initial hemodynamics and the interval elapsing until perfusion stops.
  • Efficacy increased in a dose-related manner as well as during the time interval of observation (i.e., 2 h after application).
  • They constrict during thrombogenesis as a local response to substances released by the thrombus.
  • [MeSH-major] Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Serotonin Antagonists / pharmacology. Thrombosis / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 1369717.001).
  • [ISSN] 0160-2446
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiovascular pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Serotonin Antagonists
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