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1. Shou K, Niu Y, Zheng X, Ma Z, Jian C, Qi B, Hu X, Yu A: Enhancement of Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Angiogenic Capacity by NPWT for a Combinatorial Therapy to Promote Wound Healing with Large Defect. Biomed Res Int; 2017;2017:7920265

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Enhancement of Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Angiogenic Capacity by NPWT for a Combinatorial Therapy to Promote Wound Healing with Large Defect.
  • Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective for enhancing wound healing, especially for the promotion of angiogenesis within wounds.
  • Here we utilized combinatory strategy using the transplantation of BMSCs and NPWT to investigate whether this combinatory therapy could accelerate angiogenesis in wounds.
  • In vivo, rat full-thickness cutaneous wounds treated with BMSCs combined with NPWT exhibited better viability of the cells and enhanced angiogenesis and maturation of functional blood vessels than did local BMSC injection or NPWT alone.
  • Expression of angiogenesis markers (NG2, VEGF, CD31, and <i>α</i>-SMA) was upregulated in wounds treated with combined BMSCs with NPWT.
  • Our data suggest that NPWT may act as an inductive role to enhance BMSCs angiogenic capacity and this combinatorial therapy may serve as a simple but efficient clinical solution for complex wounds with large defects.
  • [MeSH-major] Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / cytology. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy. Neovascularization, Physiologic. Wound Healing
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers / metabolism. Cell Differentiation. Cell Proliferation. Cell Shape. Cell Survival. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytokines / metabolism. Male. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 28243602.001).
  • [ISSN] 2314-6141
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMed research international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomed Res Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cytokines
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2. Kim DW, Cho SH: Emerging Endotypes of Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Its Application to Precision Medicine. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res; 2017 Jul;9(4):299-306
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Defining endotypes can help clinicians predict disease prognosis, select subjects suitable for a specific therapy, and assess risks for comorbid conditions, including asthma.
  • Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), interleukin (IL)-25, and IL-33, which are mainly secreted by epithelial cells in response to external stimuli, act on type 2 ILCs and T helper 2 (Th2) cells, inducing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13.
  • Local immunoglobulin E (IgE) production is also a signature event in nasal polyps (NP).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology · The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease.
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  • (PMID = 28497916.001).
  • [ISSN] 2092-7355
  • [Journal-full-title] Allergy, asthma & immunology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Allergy Asthma Immunol Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / K23 AI110731
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Nasal polyps / biologicals / chronic rhinosinusitis / cytokines / endotypes / phenotypes
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3. Mukherjee M, Lim HF, Thomas S, Miller D, Kjarsgaard M, Tan B, Sehmi R, Khalidi N, Nair P: Airway autoimmune responses in severe eosinophilic asthma following low-dose Mepolizumab therapy. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol; 2017;13:2

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Airway autoimmune responses in severe eosinophilic asthma following low-dose Mepolizumab therapy.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: A 62-year old woman diagnosed with severe eosinophilic asthma showed poor response to Mepolizumab therapy (100 mg subcutaneous dose/monthly) and subsequent worsening of symptoms.
  • The treatment response to Mepolizumab was monitored using both blood and sputum eosinophil counts.
  • The latter was superior in assessing deterioration in symptoms, suggesting that normal blood eosinophil count may not always indicate amelioration or adequate control of the ongoing eosinophil-driven disease process.
  • This perplexing situation of persistent airway eosinophilia and increased steroid insensitivity despite an anti-eosinophil therapy can be explained if the administered dose of the mAb was inadequate in comparison to the target antigen.
  • The resultant immune complexes could act as 'cytokine depots', protecting the potency of the 'bound' IL-5, thereby sustaining the eosinophilic inflammation within the target tissue.
  • CONCLUSIONS: While anti-IL5 mAb therapy is an exciting novel option to treat patients with severe asthma, there is the rare possibility of worsening of asthma as observed in this case study, due to local autoimmune mechanisms precipitated by potential inadequate airway levels of the monoclonal antibody.

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  • (PMID = 28070196.001).
  • [ISSN] 1710-1484
  • [Journal-full-title] Allergy, asthma, and clinical immunology : official journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autoantibodies / Autoimmune / Eosinophilic asthma / IL-5 / Immune complex / Mepolizumab / Sputum
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4. Osborne BJW, Marsh AK, Huibner S, Shahabi K, Liu C, Contente T, Nagelkerke NJD, Kovacs C, Benko E, Price L, MacDonald KS, Kaul R: Clinical and Mucosal Immune Correlates of HIV-1 Semen Levels in Antiretroviral-Naive Men. Open Forum Infect Dis; 2017;4(2):ofx033

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: This study was done to characterize parameters associated with semen human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) viral load (VL) variability in HIV-infected, therapy-naive men.
  • METHODS: Paired blood and semen samples were collected from 30 HIV-infected, therapy-naive men who have sex with men, and 13 participants were observed longitudinally for up to 1 year.
  • In the baseline cross-sectional analysis, an increased semen HIV VL correlated with local CMV reactivation, the semen bacterial load, and semen inflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin (IL)-8.
  • T cells in semen were more activated than blood, and there was an increased frequency of Th17 cells and γδ-T-cells.
  • Subsequent prospective analysis demonstrated striking interindividual variability in HIV and CMV shedding patterns, and only semen IL-8 levels and the blood VL were independently associated with semen HIV levels.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Several clinical and immune parameters were associated with increased HIV semen levels in antiretroviral therapy-naive men, with induction of local proinflammatory cytokines potentially acting as a common pathway.

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  • (PMID = 28534034.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Open forum infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Open Forum Infect Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; HIV / cytokines / herpesviruses / microbiome / semen.
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5. Corrigan ML, Huang S, Weaver A, Keeler D, Rahe K, Balint J, Marti M, Goodman B, Nagy T, DeLano V, Bond B, for Home and Alternate Site Care Section, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: Resources for the Provision of Nutrition Support to Children in Educational Environments. Nutr Clin Pract; 2017 Jul 01;:884533617718471

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • As these children grow and enter educational settings, there is a need for awareness of the care that these children require for nutrition support therapy.
  • Care is individualized to the specific child and may include provision of nutrition support therapy while in the school setting, maintenance of a nutrition access device, and monitoring to safely prevent or act on signs of potential complications.
  • Suggested roles and responsibilities of those involved with nutrition support care are discussed; however, all interventions and routine care must be in accordance with physician's orders, school nurse privileges and competencies, and state and local regulations.

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  • (PMID = 28700266.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-2452
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Clin Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; enteral nutrition / home nutrition support / nutrition support / parenteral nutrition / pediatrics
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6. Obata F, Murakami T, Miyagi J, Ueda S, Inagaki T, Minato M, Ono H, Nishimura K, Shibata E, Tamaki M, Yoshimoto S, Kishi F, Kishi S, Matsuura M, Nagai K, Abe H, Doi T: A case of rapid amelioration of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis treated by interferon-free directly acting antivirals for HCV in the absence of immunosuppressant. CEN Case Rep; 2017 May;6(1):55-60

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of rapid amelioration of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis treated by interferon-free directly acting antivirals for HCV in the absence of immunosuppressant.
  • Patients with mixed cryoglobulinemic nephropathy who have a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis should receive immunosuppressive therapy.
  • After disease stabilization, patients should receive concurrent therapy for the underlying HCV infection.
  • The standard therapy of a chronic HCV infection is IFN monotherapy or IFN combined with ribavirin; however, after the introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), the standard therapy for patients with HCV genotype 1 has dramatically changed.
  • We report a case of HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) successfully treated by daclatasvir and asunaprevir, which are IFN-free DAAs for HCV, in combination with angiotensin II receptor blocker without immunosuppressive therapy.
  • Blood examination revealed a high copy number of HCV-RNA (6.4 log IU/mL, type 1), cryoglobulinemia, paraproteinemia of IgM-κ, and hypocomplementemia.

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  • (PMID = 28509128.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] CEN case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] CEN Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis / Hepatitis C virus / Interferon-free direct-acting antiviral agents
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7. Ganfon H, Diallo T, Nanga C, Coulibaly N, Benao V, Ekanmian G, Sandouidi A, Daniel Garcia E: Private pharmacy staff in five main towns in Benin, Burkina Faso, and Mali: knowledge and practices concerning malaria care in 2014. Med Sante Trop; 2017 Jun 01;27(2):164-169

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Connaissances et pratiques de la prise en charge du paludisme par le personnel des pharmacies privées de cinq grandes villes du Bénin, Burkina Faso et Mali en 2014.
  • A pretested questionnaire was administered to the supervisor present in each pharmacy at the time of the survey.
  • Data were collected by local students in the first quarter of 2014.
  • Among the participants, 84% knew about the national malaria control program, and 77.7% about artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), while 38.8% knew the national protocols.
  • Licensed pharmacists had a better knowledge of ACT than their assistants, and training improved knowledge of treatment for uncomplicated malaria episodes.
  • They are ready to advise ACT when appropriate after rapid detection tests.

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  • (PMID = 28655677.001).
  • [ISSN] 2261-2211
  • [Journal-full-title] Medecine et sante tropicales
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Sante Trop
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ACT / Malaria / West Africa / practices / private pharmacies
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8. Ogawa R: Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis. Int J Mol Sci; 2017 Mar 10;18(3)
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation.
  • As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits.
  • These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors.
  • At present, physicians cannot (or at least find it very difficult to) control systemic and genetic risk factors of keloids and hypertrophic scars.
  • However, they can use a number of treatment modalities that all, interestingly, act by reducing inflammation.
  • They include corticosteroid injection/tape/ointment, radiotherapy, cryotherapy, compression therapy, stabilization therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy, and surgical methods that reduce skin tension.

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  • (PMID = 28287424.001).
  • [ISSN] 1422-0067
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of molecular sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Mol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukins
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; hypertrophic scar / keloid / radiation / steroid tape / surgery
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9. Akahoshi K, Ochiai T, Takaoka A, Kitamura T, Ban D, Kudo A, Tanaka S, Tanabe M: Emergency Cholecystectomy for Patients on Antiplatelet Therapy. Am Surg; 2017 May 01;83(5):486-490

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Emergency Cholecystectomy for Patients on Antiplatelet Therapy.
  • The use of antiplatelet therapy (APT) and/or anticoagulant therapy (ACT) continues to increase due to the aging population.
  • Because the management of patients with acute cholecystitis receiving APT/ACT is still unclear, surgeons are sometimes faced with the difficult decision to delay surgery.
  • Treatment outcomes among 13 patients who underwent cholecystectomy without discontinuing APT (the cAPT group), 11 patients who discontinued APT and ACT (the D group), and 89 patients who did not receive preoperative APT and/or ACT (the No APT group) were compared.
  • There were no significant differences in intraoperative blood loss, conversion to open surgery, and bleeding-related complications.
  • However, the incidence of intraoperative blood transfusion was higher in the cAPT group (P = 0.04).
  • They presented with severe local inflammation; thus, it was difficult to stop bleeding from the gallbladder bed.
  • Hemostatic tools for liver surgery were used to control bleeding.
  • However, in case of severe local inflammation, there is a greater risk for massive hemorrhage.

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  • (PMID = 28541859.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-9823
  • [Journal-full-title] The American surgeon
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Wolfensberger TJ: Macular Edema - Rationale for Therapy. Dev Ophthalmol; 2017;58:74-86

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Macular Edema - Rationale for Therapy.
  • When macular edema is caused by a generalized health problem such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or generalized inflammatory conditions, treatment of these generalized diseases can in many cases cure macular edema directly.
  • In ocular diseases, the local exudation of fluid from blood vessels is governed by Starling's law as well as by intricate cellular mechanisms linked to the tight junctions in the inner and outer blood-retinal barrier.
  • Drugs used in clinical practice, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, all act in one way or another through these cellular mechanisms.
  • Successful surgical treatment of macular edema using vitrectomy and peeling relies, apart from the evident release of vitreomacular traction, on many other cellular and biochemical mechanisms activated by the surgery such as oxygenation of the inner retina, removal of the posterior hyaloid as a growth factor sink, and possible Müller cell remodeling with fluid redirection after internal limiting membrane peeling.

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  • [Copyright] © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 28351053.001).
  • [ISSN] 1662-2790
  • [Journal-full-title] Developments in ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dev Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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11. Bockel S, Antoni D, Deutsch É, Mornex F: [Immunotherapy and radiotherapy]. Cancer Radiother; 2017 May;21(3):244-255

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • By an immunologic cell death, tumor cells exposed to radiation release a large amount of neoantigenes and pro-inflammatory mediators, acting as an in situ vaccine, resulting in an tumor regression within the primary irradiated site, but also in the distant "out of field" secondary tumors.
  • Over the last years, many scientific data and preclinical studies have demonstrated that the combination of local irradiation with immune therapy has a synergistic action in inducing an antitumoral immunity, thus enhancing an abscopal effect.
  • In this article, we summarize the main mechanisms cancer harnesses to evade the control of the immune system and how ionising radiations can induce an antitumor immunity.
  • A focus reports then on recent preclinical and clinical research built on this background of combined radiation and immune therapy, which bear the great potential to further improve anticancer therapies.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.
  • (PMID = 28522277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6658
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiotherapie : journal de la Societe francaise de radiotherapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Abscopal / Immunotherapy / Immunothérapie / Radiotherapy / Radiothérapie
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12. Harvey M, Cave G: Lipid emulsion in local anesthetic toxicity. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol; 2017 Jul 07;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lipid emulsion in local anesthetic toxicity.
  • Despite widespread awareness and improved techniques (including the increasing use of ultrasound guidance for block placement), intravascular sequestration and the attendant risk of local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) remains.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Although incompletely elucidated the mechanism of action for ILE in LAST seemingly involves beneficial effects on initial drug distribution (i.e., pharmacokinetic effects) and positive cardiotonic and vasoactive effects (i.e., pharmacokinetic effects) acting in concert.
  • Recent systematic review by collaborating international toxicologic societies have provided reserved endorsement for ILE in bupivacaine-induced toxicity, weak support for ILE use in toxicity from other local anesthetics, and largely neutral recommendation for all other drug poisonings.
  • SUMMARY: Lipid emulsion remains first-line therapy (in conjunction with standard resuscitative measures) in LAST.

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  • (PMID = 28692439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-6500
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in anaesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Anaesthesiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Aznar MA, Tinari N, Rullán AJ, Sánchez-Paulete AR, Rodriguez-Ruiz ME, Melero I: Intratumoral Delivery of Immunotherapy-Act Locally, Think Globally. J Immunol; 2017 Jan 01;198(1):31-39

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intratumoral Delivery of Immunotherapy-Act Locally, Think Globally.
  • : Immune mechanisms have evolved to cope with local entry of microbes acting in a confined fashion but eventually inducing systemic immune memory.
  • Indeed, in situ delivery of a number of agents into tumors can mimic in the malignant tissue the phenomena that control intracellular infection leading to the killing of infected cells.
  • Intratumoral therapy with pathogen-associated molecular patterns or recombinant viruses is being tested in the clinic.
  • Local delivery means less systemic toxicity while focusing the immune response on the malignancy and the affected draining lymph nodes.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
  • (PMID = 27994166.001).
  • [ISSN] 1550-6606
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Pissulin CN, de Souza Castro PA, Codina F, Pinto CG, Vechetti-Junior IJ, Matheus SM: GaAs laser therapy reestablishes the morphology of the NMJ and nAChRs after injury due to bupivacaine. J Photochem Photobiol B; 2017 Feb;167:256-263

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] GaAs laser therapy reestablishes the morphology of the NMJ and nAChRs after injury due to bupivacaine.
  • BACKGROUND: Local anesthetics are used to relieve pre- and postoperative pain, acting on both sodium channels and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ).
  • Bupivacaine acts as a non-competitive antagonist and has limitations, such as myotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and inflammation.
  • Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has anti-inflammatory, regenerative, and analgesic effects.
  • Next, the animals were divided into a Control group (C) and a Laser group (LLLT).
  • The maximum diameters of the NMJs were lower in the Bupi (15.048±1.985) and LLLT/Bupi subgroups (15.456±1.983) compared to the Cl (18.502±2.058) and LLLT/Cl subgroups (19.356±2.522) (p<0.05).
  • There was an increase in the perimeter of the LLLT/Bupi subgroup (150.33) compared to the Bupi subgroup (74.69) (p<0.01) observed by confocal microscopy.
  • There was also an increase in the relative planar area of the NMJ after LBI (8.75) compared to CBupi (4.80) (p<0.01).
  • There was an increase in protein expression of the ε subunit after application of LLLT (13.055) compared to Bupi (0.251) (p<0.01).
  • Taken together, the present experiments indicate that there was a positive association of the α and γ subunits (p<0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that LLLT at the dose used in this study reduced structural alterations in the NMJ and molecular changes in nAChRs triggered by bupivacaine, providing important data supporting the use of LLLT in therapeutic protocols for injuries triggered by local anesthetics.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / adverse effects. Bupivacaine / adverse effects. Lasers, Semiconductor. Low-Level Light Therapy. Neuromuscular Junction / radiation effects. Receptors, Nicotinic / radiation effects

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28088107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2682
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of photochemistry and photobiology. B, Biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Photochem. Photobiol. B, Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Receptors, Nicotinic; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Bupivacaine / Low-level light therapy / Neuromuscular junction / Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
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15. Fu Y, Karbaat L, Wu L, Leijten JCH, Both S, Karperien M: Trophic effects of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue regeneration. Tissue Eng Part B Rev; 2017 May 10;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered to hold great therapeutic value for cell-based therapy and for tissue regeneration in particular.
  • These bioactive factors have diverse actions like modulating the local immune system, enhancing angiogenesis, preventing cell apoptosis, and stimulating survival, proliferation and differentiation of resident tissue specific cells.
  • We will also highlight the various underlying mechanisms employed by MSCs to act as trophic mediators.

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  • (PMID = 28490258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1937-3376
  • [Journal-full-title] Tissue engineering. Part B, Reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tissue Eng Part B Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Hunyady B, Gerlei Z, Gervain J, Horváth G, Lengyel G, Pár A, Péter Z, Rókusz L, Schneider F, Szalay F, Tornai I, Werling K, Makara M: [Screening, diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of hepatitis C virus related liver disease. National consensus guideline in Hungary from 15 October 2016]. Orv Hetil; 2017 Feb;158(Suppl 1):3-22

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : Treatment of hepatitis C is based on a national consensus guideline updated six-monthly according to local availability and affordability of approved therapies through a transparent allocation system in Hungary.
  • This updated guideline incorporates some special new aspects, including recommendations for screening, diagnostics, use and allocation of novel direct acting antiviral agents.
  • Indication of therapy in patients with no contraindication is based on demonstration of viral replication with consequent inflammation and/or fibrosis in the liver.
  • Therefore, expensive novel direct acting antiviral combinations as first line treatment are reimbursed only, if the freely available, but less effective and more toxic pegylated interferon plus ribavirin dual therapy deemed to prone high chance of adverse events and/or low chance of cure.
  • Interferon-free treatments and shorter therapy durations are preferred. Orv.

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  • (PMID = 28218867.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; direct acting antiviral drug / direkt ható antivirális szer / genotype / genotípus / hepatitis C virus / hepatitis C-vírus / hepatocellular carcinoma / interferon / liver cirrhosis / májrák / májzsugor / polimerázgátló / polymerase inhibitor / protease inhibitor / proteázgátló / replication complex inhibitor / replikációskomplex-gátló / viral hepatitis / vírushepatitis
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17. Butler SM: Changes to radiotherapy utilisation in Western NSW after the opening of a local service. J Med Radiat Sci; 2017 Feb 03;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Changes to radiotherapy utilisation in Western NSW after the opening of a local service.
  • INTRODUCTION: In 2011, the first radiotherapy centre in Western NSW Local Health District (WNSWLHD) was opened in the city of Orange.
  • METHODS: Data were collected on WNSWLHD patients, 17 years of age and above, who received radiotherapy in either 2010 or 2012 in New South Wales (NSW) or Australian Capital Territory (ACT).

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  • [Copyright] © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.
  • (PMID = 28160454.001).
  • [ISSN] 2051-3909
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical radiation sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Radiat Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Health services / patient access / radiation oncology / rural / travel distance
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18. Khlopas A, Elmallah RK, Chughtai M, Yakubek GA, Faour M, Klika AK, Higuera CA, Molloy RM, Mont MA: The Learning Curve Associated with the Administration of Intra-Articular Liposomal Bupivacaine for Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Pilot Study. Surg Technol Int; 2017 Feb 07;30

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Liposomal bupivacaine is a long-acting, local, injectable anesthetic that is used to potentially mitigate post-operative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).
  • Pain scores were calculated using the visual analogue scale (VAS), obtained from the first post-operative physical therapy note.
  • We used an ANOVA test for continuous and X2-square test for categorical variables.

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  • (PMID = 28182826.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-3941
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical technology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Technol Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Rupreht RR, Mozetič-Francky B, Francky A, Matis M, Škoberne M, Galvani V, Malovrh T, Kotnik V, Šerbec VČ: Murine monoclonal antibodies directed against human recombinant Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor. Pflugers Arch; 2000 Jan;440(Suppl 1):R078-R080

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a crucial component of the immune system acting together with glucocorticosteroids to regulate immunity and inflammation.
  • Due to the newest findings that a local MIF expression is up regulated in allograft rejection and in glomerulonephritis, an interest in MIF research is increasing and is focused on possibilities of anti-MIF treatment.In the present work new murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against human recombinant MIF (hrMIF) are described. hrMIF protein used for the immunisation was tested for its biological activity and has evident macrophage migration inhibitory activity.
  • Anti-MIF MAb designated as Ml inhibited MIF activity in the test, which was performed in the 48 well Boyden chamber system.

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  • (PMID = 28008489.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2013
  • [Journal-full-title] Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pflugers Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Key words MIF / anti-MIF MAb / anti-MIF therapy / immune response
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20. Doumbo O, Fall IS, Niaré D: [Malaria is still a leading cause of fever and death among children and pregnant women in Africa in 2015]. Bull Acad Natl Med; 2016 03;200(3):453-66
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Malaria.

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  • This is the result of the important progress made in scaling up the main interventions such the rapid diagnosis test, Artemisinin-based combination therapies, long lasting insecticide treated nets, indoor residual house spraying, intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp-SP), Seasonal Malaria Chemoprophylaxis with combined antimalarial (SMClAQ-SP).
  • For the time being only countries in Northern Africa and few in East Africa (Mauritius) have reached the elimination of local transmission.
  • A huge global stock out of ACT.
  • A new hope is emerging with the development of candidate vaccine from whole sporozoïte, the other candidates vaccines blocking the transmission in phase 1b and the new SMC Plus strategy (AQ-SP+Azithromycine).
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Eradication. Infection Control. Malaria / prevention & control. Malaria / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Africa / epidemiology. Antimalarials / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / mortality. Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / prevention & control. Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 28635244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-4079
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin de l'Academie nationale de medecine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull. Acad. Natl. Med.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimalarials
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21. Li M, Wu H, Wang Y, Yin T, Gregersen H, Zhang X, Liao X, Wang G: Immobilization of heparin/poly-l-lysine microspheres on medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel surface to improve the biocompatibility and suppress thrombosis. Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl; 2017 Apr 01;73:198-205
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  • Thrombosis formation, restenosis, and delayed endothelium regeneration continue to be a challenge for coronary artery stent therapy.
  • Furthermore, for plasma coagulation tests, the activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time were prolonged and depended on the heparinfunction.
  • [MeSH-major] Biocompatible Materials / pharmacology. Heparin / pharmacology. Microspheres. Nickel / pharmacology. Nitrogen / pharmacology. Polylysine / pharmacology. Stainless Steel / pharmacology. Thrombosis / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antioxidants / metabolism. Blood Platelets / drug effects. Blood Platelets / ultrastructure. Cell Count. Cell Death / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cell Shape / drug effects. Dental Alloys. Dopamine / analysis. Fibrinogen / metabolism. Hemolysis / drug effects. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells / drug effects. Humans. Nitric Oxide / metabolism. Partial Thromboplastin Time. Particle Size. Platelet Adhesiveness / drug effects. Prothrombin Time. Rabbits. Static Electricity. Surface Properties

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  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NITRIC OXIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOPAMINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NICKEL, ELEMENTAL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Nitrogen, Elemental .
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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28183598.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-0191
  • [Journal-full-title] Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Dental Alloys; 12244-31-4 / Austenite; 12597-68-1 / Stainless Steel; 25104-18-1 / Polylysine; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; 7OV03QG267 / Nickel; 9001-32-5 / Fibrinogen; 9005-49-6 / Heparin; N762921K75 / Nitrogen; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Blood compatibility / Coronary stent / Heparin / High nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel / Microsphere
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22. McArthur TA, Narducci CA, Lander PH, Lopez-Ben R: Percutane Image-Guided Cryoablation of Painful Osseous Metastases: A Retrospective Single-Center Review. Curr Probl Diagn Radiol; 2017 Jul - Aug;46(4):282-287

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: In this institutional review board-approved, health insurance portability and accountability act-compliant study, we retrospectively searched our department׳s picture archiving system for patients who underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous cryoablation for treatment of painful metastatic osseous disease over a 6-year period (1/1/2005-12/31/2011).
  • The preprocedure and postprocedure images and imaging reports, primary tumor type, CT-guided cryoablation procedure details, treated tumor response, immediate and 3-month postprocedure complications, reported pain response to cryoablation, postprocedural tumor imaging characteristics, and imaging response of noncryoablated systemically treated metastatic lesions were reviewed in patients with metastatic osseous disease who underwent cryoablation.
  • RESULTS: All 16 patients reported improvement in pain within 1 week after the procedure and at 3-month clinical follow-up.
  • A total of 6.2% had tumor growth and 93.8% had tumor arrest or shrinkage on follow-up CT, although all study patients had progression of noncryoablated metastases at other sites despite systemic therapy.
  • A total of 62.5% of patients with posttreatment contrasted CT demonstrated marginal enhancement at the ablation site, although only single patient had interval growth.
  • CONCLUSION: Most of our patients had tumor arrest or shrinkage on follow-up imaging, despite progression of noncryoablated metastases treated with preprocedure and postprocedure systemic therapy.
  • Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and analgesics have a moderate failure rate and require repeat treatments where quality of life is the foremost objective.
  • CT-guided cryoablation is a safe palliative treatment to reduce pain in patients with painful osseous metastatic disease, achieve effective local tumor control, and in some cases, provide a curative option for a target lesion.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28034477.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-6302
  • [Journal-full-title] Current problems in diagnostic radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Probl Diagn Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Bardia A, Blackford AL, Lin J, Armstrong AJ, King S, Rudek MA, Yegnasubramanian ST, Carducci MA: A prostate cancer clinical trials consortium trial of disulfiram (D) in men with nonmetastatic recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). J Clin Oncol; 2013 Feb 20;31(6_suppl):219

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: To determine if D leads to demethylation changes [i.e. decreased global 5<sup>me</sup>C DNA content from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)] we conducted an open-label, dose escalation trial of D in men with non-metastatic recurrent PCa after local therapy.
  • >10% decrease in global 5<sup>me</sup>C content) in <3 patients was observed in cohort 1.
  • Secondary endpoints included rate of PSA progression at 6 months (i.e. confirmed >50% rise over baseline and >2 ng/mL above nadir), changes in PSA doubling time (PSADT) and safety/tolerability.
  • Cohort 2 accrued a total of 10 patients, 3 (30.0%) of which had >10% decrease in global 5<sup>me</sup>C content.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A minority of patients had global PBMC demethylation changes, consistent with D acting as a probable demethylating agent in those individuals.

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  • (PMID = 28137035.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Rutter GA, Hodson DJ, Chabosseau P, Haythorne E, Pullen TJ, Leclerc I: Local and regional control of calcium dynamics in the pancreatic islet. Diabetes Obes Metab; 2017 May 03;
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  • [Title] Local and regional control of calcium dynamics in the pancreatic islet.
  • Ca<sup>2+</sup> is the key intracellular regulator of insulin secretion, acting in the beta cell as the ultimate trigger for exocytosis.
  • In response to high glucose, ATP-sensitive K<sup>+</sup> channel closure and plasma membrane depolarisation engage a sophisticated machinery to drive pulsatile cytosolic Ca<sup>2+</sup> changes.
  • Voltage-gated Ca<sup>2+</sup> channels, Ca<sup>2+</sup> -activated K<sup>+</sup> channels and Na<sup>+</sup> /Ca<sup>2+</sup> exchange all play important roles.
  • The use of targeted Ca<sup>2+</sup> probes has revealed that during each cytosolic Ca<sup>2+</sup> pulse, uptake of Ca<sup>2+</sup> by mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), secretory granules and lysosomes fine-tune cytosolic Ca<sup>2+</sup> dynamics and control organellar function.
  • For example, changes in the expression of the Ca<sup>2+</sup> binding protein Sorcin appear to provide a link between ER Ca<sup>2+</sup> levels and ER stress, affecting beta cell function and survival.
  • Across the islet, intercellular communication between highly interconnected "hubs", which act as pacemaker beta cells, and subservient "followers", ensures efficient insulin secretion.
  • New insights into the control of both the intra- and intercellular Ca<sup>2+</sup> dynamics may thus shed light on T2D pathology and provide novel opportunities for therapy.

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  • [Copyright] This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28466490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1463-1326
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetes, obesity & metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetes Obes Metab
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ca2+ / connectivity / imaging / insulin / organelle
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25. Rajurkar SP, Singh T, Arora M, Saha S, Gayar H, Talwar N, Nettleton J: Concurrent weekly taxane (T) and radiation therapy (RT) in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer (BrCa). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):858

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Concurrent weekly taxane (T) and radiation therapy (RT) in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer (BrCa).
  • : 858 Background: High-risk BrCa pts receive adriamycin(A) + cyclophosphamide(C) followed by a T given every 3 wks × 4 followed by radiation therapy (RT).
  • T is suggested to act as radiosensitisers.
  • Then they received A + C every 3 wks × 4 followed by either Paclitaxel (P)(80 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/wk) or Docetaxel (D)(30 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/wk) every wk with concurrent RT 5 days/wk for 6 wks followed by a T alone every wk for 6 wks.
  • No local recurrences have occurred.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although there have been no local recurrences, an interruption in RT of 10 days in 22% patients is concerning.
  • At this point, we cannot recommend concurrent weekly Taxane and Radiation therapy in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer pts.

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  • (PMID = 28014278.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Petri M, Stoffels I, Griewank K, Jose J, Engels P, Schulz A, Pötzschke H, Jansen P, Schadendorf D, Dissemond J, Klode J: Oxygenation Status in Chronic Leg Ulcer After Topical Hemoglobin Application May Act as a Surrogate Marker to Find the Best Treatment Strategy and to Avoid Ineffective Conservative Long-term Therapy. Mol Imaging Biol; 2017 Jul 12;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Oxygenation Status in Chronic Leg Ulcer After Topical Hemoglobin Application May Act as a Surrogate Marker to Find the Best Treatment Strategy and to Avoid Ineffective Conservative Long-term Therapy.
  • PURPOSE: Chronic leg ulcers can be a challenge to treat and long-term therapy a significant cost factor in western public health budgets.
  • Objective wound assessment assays enabling selection of appropriate wound therapy regimes would be desirable.
  • The aims were to determine if changes in tissue oxygenation can be measured after topical application of hemoglobin on chronic wounds and to evaluate the findings in terms of therapy strategies.
  • PROCEDURES: Photoacoustic imaging was used to measure the local oxygen saturation (StO<sub>2</sub>) in leg ulcers before and after hemoglobin spray treatment.
  • RESULTS: Measuring 49 patients, an increase in StO<sub>2</sub> after topical hemoglobin application from on average 66.1 to 71 % (p = 0.017) after 20 min was observed.
  • Depending on the increase in StO<sub>2</sub> (>10 % or <10 %) patients were stratified into a Responder and a Non-Responder group.
  • CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the likelihood of wound healing under conservative therapy can be predicted by measuring changes in StO<sub>2</sub> after topical hemoglobin application.
  • This assay may reduce treatment time and costs by avoiding ineffective conservative long-term therapy.

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  • (PMID = 28702902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1860-2002
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular imaging and biology : MIB : the official publication of the Academy of Molecular Imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Imaging Biol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Chronic wounds / Hemoglobin treatment / Photoacoustic imaging
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27. Kwiatt M, Spitz FR, LaCouture TA: Early experience with robotic radiosurgery for local control of liver metastasis. J Clin Oncol; 2012 Feb;30(4_suppl):295

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Early experience with robotic radiosurgery for local control of liver metastasis.
  • : 295 Background: Liver toxicity limits radiation therapy for liver metastasis; however, robotic radiosurgery delivers effective doses with limited toxicities.
  • Preradiosurgery and follow-up abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans reviewed for treatment response.
  • Our primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as increased enhancement or tumor progression within the treatment field on follow-up CT scan.
  • Prior to radiosurgery 27 of 33 patients (81.8%) had undergone surgical resection of primary tumor, 26 of 33 patients (78.8%) were treated with chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and 15 of 33 patients (45.5%) had non-liver radiation therapy.
  • Median time from primary diagnosis to radiosurgery treatment was 33.3 months (5.7 to 320 months).
  • Sixteen patients had disease progression outside the treatment field (15 liver, 6 systemic) with a median time to progression of 4.6 months (0.9 to 17.6).
  • Five lesions (13.5%) had in field progression with a median time to progression of 10 months (2.6 to 13.1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Robotic radiosurgery offers a potential local therapy for patients with metastatic liver disease with limited toxicity.

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  • (PMID = 27982843.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Santos JM, Havunen R, Siurala M, Cervera-Carrascon V, Tähtinen S, Sorsa S, Anttila M, Karell P, Kanerva A, Hemminki A: Adenoviral production of interleukin-2 at the tumor site removes the need for systemic postconditioning in adoptive cell therapy. Int J Cancer; 2017 Jun 14;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adenoviral production of interleukin-2 at the tumor site removes the need for systemic postconditioning in adoptive cell therapy.
  • Systemic high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) postconditioning has long been utilized in boosting the efficacy of T cells in adoptive cell therapy (ACT) of solid tumors.
  • The resulting severe off-target toxicity of these regimens renders local production at the tumor an attractive concept with possible safety gains.
  • We evaluated the efficacy and safety of intratumorally administered IL-2-coding adenoviruses in combination with tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte therapy in syngeneic Syrian hamsters bearing HapT1 pancreatic tumors and with T cell receptor transgenic ACT in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice.
  • In both models, local production of IL-2 successfully replaced the need for systemic recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2) administration and increased the efficacy of the cell therapy.
  • In summary, local IL-2 production results in efficacy and safety gains in the context of ACT.

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  • [Copyright] © 2017 UICC.
  • (PMID = 28614908.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; T cell therapy / adoptive cell therapy / immunotherapy / interleukin-2 / oncolytic adenovirus
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29. Aldridge A, Dowd W, Bray J: The relative impact of brief treatment versus brief intervention in primary health-care screening programs for substance use disorders. Addiction; 2017 Feb;112 Suppl 2:54-64
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  • DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 9029 patients with both baseline and follow-up interviews were identified in the US Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) data from October 2004 and February 2008.
  • Using a propensity score framework, multiple generalized linear mixed models and a local linear matching method with a difference in difference estimator, patients from the BI group that resemble BT patients were used to determine the relative treatment effect of BT.
  • A total of 3218 of these US patients with baseline and follow-up interviews were used in the final analysis sample after the propensity score-matching procedure (1448 patients assigned to a BI service category and 1770 assigned to a BT service category).
  • BT was found to reduce the frequency of use of illicit drugs at follow-up by 0.634 days more than BI (P < 0.05).
  • Higher severity patients assigned to BT had a decrease in days of illicit drug use of 1.765 (P < 0.05).

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  • [Copyright] © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.
  • (PMID = 28074568.001).
  • [ISSN] 1360-0443
  • [Journal-full-title] Addiction (Abingdon, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Addiction
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Brief intervention / SBI / SBIRT / brief therapy / brief treatment / illicit drugs / propensity score / quasi-experimental
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30. Yoo ER, Perumpail RB, Cholankeril G, Jayasekera CR, Ahmed A: The Role of e-Health in Optimizing Task-Shifting in the Delivery of Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C. Telemed J E Health; 2017 Apr 04;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The Role of e-Health in Optimizing Task-Shifting in the Delivery of Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C.
  • PURPOSE: Recently, we reported the successful application of task-shifting to improve the management of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection receiving treatment with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in underserved areas of California.
  • A nonphysician healthcare provider worked in close conjunction with a hepatologist to monitor the patients during the course of antiviral therapy.
  • We exclusively used our institution-based, secured e-health portal as the means of communication with the local staff and patients in outreach clinics.

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  • (PMID = 28375820.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-3669
  • [Journal-full-title] Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Telemed J E Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; e-health / healthcare access / hepatitis C virus / task-shifting / telemedicine
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31. Baumert TF, Jühling F, Ono A, Hoshida Y: Hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of new generation antivirals. BMC Med; 2017 Mar 14;15(1):52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • New direct-acting antivirals substantially improved the cure rate to above 90%.
  • Direct-acting antivirals may affect cancer development and recurrence, which needs to be determined in further investigation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / virology. Hepatitis C / complications. Hepatitis C / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Hepacivirus / physiology. Humans. Interferons / therapeutic use. Liver Cirrhosis / drug therapy. Liver Cirrhosis / pathology. Liver Cirrhosis / virology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / virology

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  • (PMID = 28288626.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-7015
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK099558
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 9008-11-1 / Interferons
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Direct-acting antivirals / Hepatitis C virus / Hepatocellular carcinoma / Interferon / Sustained virologic response
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32. Li X, Chan NS, Tam AW, Hung IFN, Chan EW: Budget impact and cost-effectiveness analyses of direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Hong Kong. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis; 2017 May 17;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Budget impact and cost-effectiveness analyses of direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Hong Kong.
  • The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the budget impact and cost-effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Hong Kong.
  • A decision analytic model was developed to compare short-term costs and health outcomes of patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection in Hong Kong who were treated with an interferon (INF)-based treatment (dual therapy of pegylated interferon and ribavirin) or DAA-based treatments (sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir or ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir plus dasabuvir).
  • The incremental cost-effective ratios of DAA-based treatments ranged from $9724 to $29,189 per treatment success, which were all below the cost-effectiveness threshold of local GDP per capita ($42,423 in 2015).
  • Introducing DAAs to the public hospital formulary yields a considerable budget increase but is still economically favorable to the local government.

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  • (PMID = 28516201.001).
  • [ISSN] 1435-4373
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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33. Leone M, Giustiniani A, Cecchini AP: Cluster headache: present and future therapy. Neurol Sci; 2017 May;38(Suppl 1):45-50

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cluster headache: present and future therapy.
  • Cluster headache attacks need fast-acting abortive agents because the pain peaks very quickly; sumatriptan injection is the gold standard acute treatment.
  • Steroids are very effective; local injection in the occipital area is also effective but its prolonged use needs caution.

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  • (PMID = 28527055.001).
  • [ISSN] 1590-3478
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CGRP / Cluster headache / Drugs / Neurostimulation / Treatment
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34. Eng C, Xing Y, You YN, Chang GJ, Das P, Phillips J, Wolff RA, Rodriguez-Bigas MA, Ohinata A, Crane CH: Cisplatin (C) based chemoradiation (CXRT) for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the anal canal (AC): A 20-year perspective. J Clin Oncol; 2011 Feb;29(4_suppl):482

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • C was evaluated with 5-FU in 2 large phase III studies (RTOG 98-11 and ACT II) to establish superiority over 5-FU/MMC.
  • RTOG 98-11 reported reduced colostomy-free survival (CFS) in the C-induction arm; no differences were noted in the ACT II study.
  • The log-rank test was used to compare OS among these subgroups.
  • After a median follow up of 8.6 years, 14 pts (8%) developed local recurrence; 11 received salvage surgery.
  • Platinum-based therapy for anal cancer appears to be an acceptable alternative to MMC and should be considered as a standard option for locally advanced disease.

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  • (PMID = 27985490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Read P, Lothian R, Chronister K, Gilliver R, Kearley J, Dore GJ, van Beek I: Delivering direct acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C to highly marginalised and current drug injecting populations in a targeted primary health care setting. Int J Drug Policy; 2017 Jun 04;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Delivering direct acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C to highly marginalised and current drug injecting populations in a targeted primary health care setting.
  • From March 2016, the Australian Government has provided access to direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for adults with chronic HCV, without liver disease stage or drug and alcohol use restrictions.
  • All had a lifetime history of injecting drug use, with 75% having injected within the last six months, and 44% injecting at least weekly; 25% were also enrolled in opioid substitution therapy.
  • It also demonstrates feasibility to upscale DAA therapy in high-risk PWID populations, with potential individual and population-level public health benefits.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28587943.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4758
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal on drug policy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Drug Policy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Antivirals / Harm reduction / Hepatitis C / People who inject drugs / Targeted primary health care / Treatment
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36. Cheng P, Zeng W, Li L, Huo D, Zeng L, Tan J, Zhou J, Sun J, Liu G, Li Y, Guan G, Wang Y, Zhu C: PLGA-PNIPAM Microspheres Loaded with the Gastrointestinal Nutrient NaB Ameliorate Cardiac Dysfunction by Activating Sirt3 in Acute Myocardial Infarction. Adv Sci (Weinh); 2016 Dec;3(12):1600254

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Nutrients supplied by the blood are the main source of cellular energy for cardiomyocytes.
  • Sodium butyrate (NaB), a gastrointestinal nutrient, is a short-chain fatty acid (butyric acid) that may act as an energy source in AMI therapy.
  • Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-Poly (<i>N</i>-isopropylacrylamide) microspheres loaded with NaB (PP-N) are synthesized to prolong the release of NaB and are injected into ischemic zones in a Sprague-Dawley rat AMI model.
  • The results indicate that NaB, acting as a nutrient, can protect cardiomyocytes in AMI.
  • These results suggest that the gastrointestinal nutrient NaB may be a new therapy for AMI treatment, and PP-N may be the ideal therapeutic regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27981013.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Advanced science (Weinheim, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Sci (Weinh)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Sirt3 / fatty acids / ischemia / microspheres
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37. Glynne-Jones R, Sebag-Montefiore D, Meadows HM, Cunningham D, Begum R, Adab F, Benstead K, Harte RJ, Stewart J, Beare S, Hackshaw A, Kadalayil L, ACT II study group: Best time to assess complete clinical response after chemoradiotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (ACT II): a post-hoc analysis of randomised controlled phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol; 2017 Mar;18(3):347-356
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Best time to assess complete clinical response after chemoradiotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (ACT II): a post-hoc analysis of randomised controlled phase 3 trial.
  • Using data from the ACT II trial, we determined the optimum timepoint to assess clinical tumour response after chemoradiotherapy.
  • METHODS: The previously reported ACT II trial was a phase 3 randomised trial of patients of any age with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed, squamous cell carcinoma of the anus without metastatic disease from 59 centres in the UK.
  • We randomly assigned patients (by minimisation) to receive either intravenous mitomycin (one dose of 12 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on day 1) or intravenous cisplatin (one dose of 60 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on days 1 and 29), with intravenous fluorouracil (one dose of 1000 mg/m<sup>2</sup> per day on days 1-4 and 29-32) and radiotherapy (50·4 Gy in 28 daily fractions); and also did a second randomisation after initial therapy to maintenance chemotherapy (fluorouracil and cisplatin) or no maintenance chemotherapy.
  • The primary outcome was complete clinical response (the absence of primary and nodal tumour by clinical examination), in addition to overall survival and progression-free survival from time of randomisation.
  • Our data suggests that the optimum time for assessment of complete clinical response after chemoradiotherapy for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anus is 26 weeks from starting chemoradiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Chemoradiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Dose Fractionation. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Time Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Anal Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MITOMYCIN C .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .
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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 28209296.001).
  • [ISSN] 1474-5488
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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38. Sugarbaker PH: Strategies to improve local control of resected pancreas adenocarcinoma. Surg Oncol; 2017 Mar;26(1):63-70

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Strategies to improve local control of resected pancreas adenocarcinoma.
  • The disease has an anatomic location that makes it difficult for the surgeon to maintain adequate margins of resection and prevent tumor spillage at the time of resection.
  • A regional chemotherapy treatment that consists of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) with gemcitabine and long-term normothermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (NIPEC-LT) gemcitabine for 6 months postoperatively is suggested as a new treatment that has demonstrated decreases in local-regional failure and promises to more adequately target micrometastases in the peritoneal space, in the liver and lymph nodes.
  • Long-term intraperitoneal gemcitabine may act on micrometastases in the liver through absorption into the portal vein blood and the lymph nodes as a result of gemcitabine absorption by subperitoneal lymphatic channels.
  • The use of HIPEC and NIPEC-LT gemcitabine may improve local control of resected pancreas cancer.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28317586.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-3320
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Gemcitabine / Hyperthermic perioperative chemotherapy (HIPEC) / Intraoperative radiation therapy / Intraperitoneal port / Pancreaticoduodenectomy / Total pancreatectomy / Whipple procedure
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39. Verschuere J, Decroo T, Lim D, Kindermans JM, Nguon C, Huy R, Alkourdi Y, Peeters Grietens K, Gryseels C: Local constraints to access appropriate malaria treatment in the context of parasite resistance in Cambodia: a qualitative study. Malar J; 2017 Feb 17;16(1):81

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Local constraints to access appropriate malaria treatment in the context of parasite resistance in Cambodia: a qualitative study.
  • BACKGROUND: Despite emerging drug resistance in Cambodia, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is still the most efficacious therapy.
  • ACT is available free of charge in the Cambodian public sector and at a subsidized rate in the private sector.
  • Initial treatment options consist of cheap and accessible home-based care (manual therapy, herbs and biomedical medication) targeting single symptoms.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cambodian perceptions of illness that focus on single symptoms and their perceived severity may lead to the identification of one or multiple illnesses at the same time, rarely suspecting malaria from the start and implying different patterns of health seeking behaviour and treatment choice.

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  • (PMID = 28212641.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2875
  • [Journal-full-title] Malaria journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Malar. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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40. Hillman GG, Reich LA, Rothstein SE, Abernathy LM, Fountain MD, Hankerd K, Yunker CK, Rakowski JT, Quemeneur E, Slos P: Radiotherapy and MVA-MUC1-IL-2 vaccine act synergistically for inducing specific immunity to MUC-1 tumor antigen. J Immunother Cancer; 2017;5:4
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiotherapy and MVA-MUC1-IL-2 vaccine act synergistically for inducing specific immunity to MUC-1 tumor antigen.
  • Histology studies of regressing tumors at 1 week after therapy, revealed extensive tumor destruction and a heavy infiltration of CD45<sup>+</sup> leukocytes including F4/80<sup>+</sup> macrophages, CD8<sup>+</sup> cytotoxic T cells and CD4<sup>+</sup> helper T cells.
  • The generation of tumor-specific T cells by combined therapy was confirmed by IFN-γ secretion in tumor-stimulated splenocytes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that cancer vaccine given prior to local tumor irradiation augments an immune response targeted at tumor antigens that results in specific anti-tumor immunity.

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  • (PMID = 28116088.001).
  • [ISSN] 2051-1426
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal for immunotherapy of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Immunother Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; IL-2 / MUC1 / MVA vector / Radiation / Renal Cell Carcinoma
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41. Zhou B, Liao Y, Guo Y, Tarner IH, Liao C, Chen S, Kermany MH, Tu H, Zhong S, Chen P: Adoptive Cellular Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Experimental Autoimmune Polychondritis Ear Disease. ORL J Otorhinolaryngol Relat Spec; 2017;79(3):166-177
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adoptive Cellular Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Experimental Autoimmune Polychondritis Ear Disease.
  • In the past, the clinical therapy for autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune polychondritis ear disease, was mostly limited to nonspecific immunosuppressive agents, which could lead to variable responses.
  • Currently, gene therapy aims at achieving higher specificity and less adverse effects.
  • However, IL-12p40-transduced T cells suppressed IFN-γ and augmented IL-4 production, indicating their potential to act therapeutically by interrupting Th1-mediated inflammatory responses via augmenting Th2 responses.
  • These results indicate that the local delivery of IL-12p40 by T cells could inhibit CIAPED by suppressing autoimmune responses at the site of inflammation.

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  • [Copyright] © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 28463837.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0275
  • [Journal-full-title] ORL; journal for oto-rhino-laryngology and its related specialties
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ORL J. Otorhinolaryngol. Relat. Spec.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adoptive cellular gene therapy / Autoimmune polychondritis ear disease / IL-12p40
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42. TuŢă LA, Boşoteanu M, Dumitru E, Deacu M: Complicated diverticulitis in a de novo kidney transplanted patient. Rom J Morphol Embryol; 2017;58(1):249-253

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Complicated diverticulitis in a de novo kidney transplanted patient.
  • It mainly presents as sigmoid diverticulitis, but severe complications, like bleedings, infections and colon perforation may occur, frequently due to immunosuppressive therapy.
  • Moreover, antibiotherapy and hemostatics may not efficiently control evolution in such cases.
  • We report a 55-year-old patient who underwent de novo renal transplantation one year ago and recently developed a severe diverticular bleeding complicated by hemorrhagic shock.
  • Due to his immunocompromised status and unfavorable evolution under hemostatics, recombinant coagulation factor VIIa (rFVIIa) was given to avoid surgery.
  • Unfortunately, after three weeks, lower quadrant pain, tenderness, abdominal distention, and fever occurred, in spite of immunosuppressive drug changing and adequate conservative therapy.
  • Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed complicated diverticulitis, so patient underwent surgery, with partial colectomy, followed by total recovery.
  • Treatment options, usually based on our local resources and expertise, considered conservatory therapy as the first choice, keeping surgical maneuvers just as a rescue solution.

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  • (PMID = 28523327.001).
  • [ISSN] 1220-0522
  • [Journal-full-title] Romanian journal of morphology and embryology = Revue roumaine de morphologie et embryologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rom J Morphol Embryol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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43. Macià I Garau M: Radiobiology of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Rep Pract Oncol Radiother; 2017 Mar-Apr;22(2):86-95

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiobiology of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT).
  • Stereotactic body radiotherapy delivers high doses of radiation to small and well-defined targets in an extreme hypofractionated (and accelerated) scheme with a very high biological effectiveness obtaining very good initial clinical results in terms of local tumor control and acceptable rate of late complications.
  • Only through a better understanding of how high doses of ionizing radiation act, clinicians will know exactly what we do, allowing us in the future to refine our treatments.

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  • (PMID = 28490978.001).
  • [ISSN] 1507-1367
  • [Journal-full-title] Reports of practical oncology and radiotherapy : journal of Greatpoland Cancer Center in Poznan and Polish Society of Radiation Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rep Pract Oncol Radiother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Radiobiology / SBRT / Stereotactic body radiation therapy
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44. Lusk KA, Snoga JL, Benitez RM, Sarbacker GB: Management of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants Surrounding Dental Procedures With Low-to-Moderate Risk of Bleeding. J Pharm Pract; 2017 Jan 01;:897190017707126
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants Surrounding Dental Procedures With Low-to-Moderate Risk of Bleeding.
  • The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence regarding how to safely manage direct-acting oral anticoagulant (DOAC) therapy in patients requiring dental procedures with low-to-moderate risk of bleeding.
  • Articles were eligible for inclusion if the participants were taking DOAC therapy surrounding a dental procedure known to have low-to-moderate risk of bleeding.
  • Variation in the management of DOAC therapy surrounding these procedures was found.
  • Among patients undergoing low-to-moderate risk dental procedures while receiving DOAC therapy, bleeding rates were low regardless of whether the DOAC was held or continued surrounding the procedure.
  • Documented bleeding was mild and easily controlled by local hemostatic measures.
  • Patients can safely continue DOAC therapy surrounding these dental procedures.

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  • (PMID = 28506106.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-1937
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmacy practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pharm Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; anticoagulation / cardiology / direct-acting oral anticoagulant / medication safety
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45. Lombardi M, Mantione ME, Baccellieri D, Ferrara D, Castellano R, Chiesa R, Alfieri O, Foglieni C: P2X7 receptor antagonism modulates IL-1β and MMP9 in human atherosclerotic vessels. Sci Rep; 2017 Jul 07;7(1):4872
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  • Pleiotropic P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7), expressed in the carotid plaque (PL), is involved in interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) release that may influence MMP9 generation, thus their possible modulation through acting on P2X7 was investigated.
  • Acting downstream P2X7 by MMPs inhibitors, diminished IL-1β mRNA without transcriptional effect at MMP9, possibly because the assumption of statin by patients.
  • These data firstly demonstrated A740003 suitability as a specific tool to decrease inflammatory status in human vessels and might support the design of studies applying P2X7 antagonists for the local targeting and tailored therapy of atherosclerosis.

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  • (PMID = 28687781.001).
  • [ISSN] 2045-2322
  • [Journal-full-title] Scientific reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sci Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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46. Holvoet T, Devriese S, Castermans K, Boland S, Leysen D, Vandewynckel YP, Devisscher L, Van den Bossche L, Van Welden S, Dullaers M, Vandenbroucke RE, De Rycke R, Geboes K, Bourin A, Defert O, Hindryckx P, De Vos M, Laukens D: Treatment of intestinal fibrosis in experimental inflammatory bowel disease by the pleiotropic actions of a local Rho kinase inhibitor. Gastroenterology; 2017 Jun 19;
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of intestinal fibrosis in experimental inflammatory bowel disease by the pleiotropic actions of a local Rho kinase inhibitor.
  • Because systemic ROCK inhibition causes cardiovascular side-effects, we evaluated the effects of a locally acting ROCK inhibitor (AMA0825) on intestinal fibrosis.
  • RESULTS: ROCK is expressed in fibroblastic, epithelial, endothelial and muscle cells of the human intestinal tract and is activated in inflamed and fibrotic tissue.
  • AMA0825 reduced TGFβ1-induced activation of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), downregulating matrix metalloproteinases, collagen and IL6 secretion from fibroblasts.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Local ROCK inhibition prevents and reverses intestinal fibrosis by diminishing MRTF and p38 MAPK activation and increasing autophagy in fibroblasts.
  • Overall, our results show that local ROCK inhibition is promising for counteracting fibrosis as an add-on therapy for CD.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28642198.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0012
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; colitis / epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition / mesenchymal cells / stenosis
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47. Klug TE: Peritonsillar abscess: clinical aspects of microbiology, risk factors, and the association with parapharyngeal abscess. Dan Med J; 2017 Mar;64(3)
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The treatment consists of abscess drainage and antimicrobial therapy.
  • There are three accepted methods of surgical intervension: needle aspiration, incision and drainage (ID), and acute tonsillectomy (á chaud).
  • Internationally, there is a strong trend towards less invasive surgical approach to PTA treatment with avoidance of acute tonsillectomy, needle aspiration instead of ID, and in some cases even antibiotic treatment without surgical drainage.
  •   The trend towards de-escalated surgical intervention and increasing reliance on antibiotic treatment, require studies defining the significant pathogens in PTA in order to determine optimal antibiotic regimens.
  • FN-positive patients displayed significantly higher infection markers (CRP and neutrophil counts) than patients infected with other bacteria (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively).
  • We found increasing levels (at least two-fold) of anti-FN antibodies in eight of 11 FN-positive (in the tonsillar cultures) PTA patients, which was significantly more frequent compared to none of four FN-negative PTA patients and nine of 47 electively tonsillectomized controls (P = 0.026 and P < 0.001, respectively).
  • Blood cultures obtained during acute tonsillectomy mirrored the bacterial findings in the tonsillar specimens with 22% of patients having bacteremia with FN.
  • Conclusions on causality cannot be drawn from this retrospective study, but the pathophysiology behind the increased risk of PTA in smokers may be related to, previously shown, alterations in the tonsillar, bacterial flora or the local and systemical inflammatory and immunological milieu.
  • This finding suggests that FN is not a subsequent overgrowth phenomenon after abscess development, but that FN can act as pathogen in severe acute tonsillitis.

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  • (PMID = 28260599.001).
  • [ISSN] 2245-1919
  • [Journal-full-title] Danish medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dan Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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48. Kanda S, Narita S, Komine N, Kitajima S, Yamauchi M, Sugita A, Saito Y, Habuchi T: [A Case of Giant Prostate Carcinoma Effectively Treated with External-Beam Radiation Therapy]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2016 Dec;62(12):647-650
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  • [Title] [A Case of Giant Prostate Carcinoma Effectively Treated with External-Beam Radiation Therapy].
  • We present a case of gigantic prostate tumor in a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer with successful local control by external-beam radiation therapy.
  • He achieved a PSA nadir at 4 months after the initial androgen deprivation therapy and was diagnosed with castration-resistant prostate cancer three years later.
  • Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a gigantic prostatic mass occupying the whole pelvic cavity along with multiple lymph node, bone and liver metastases.
  • He underwent external beam radiation therapy (60 Gy) to the prostate, which brought about excellent local control with a 96.7% shrinkage of tumor at 2 months after radiation therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Humans. Male. Proton Therapy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Urinary Retention / etiology

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  • (PMID = 28103659.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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49. Chen YW, Shieh JP, Liu KS, Wang JJ, Hung CH: Naloxone prolongs cutaneous nociceptive block by lidocaine in rats. Fundam Clin Pharmacol; 2017 Jul 04;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We aimed to investigate the local anesthetic properties of naloxone alone or as an adjunct for the local anesthetic lidocaine.
  • The relative potency in inducing cutaneous analgesia was lidocaine [22.6 (20.1 - 25.4) μmol/kg] > naloxone [43.2 (40.3 - 46.4) μmol/kg] (p<0.05).
  • On an equi-anesthetic basis [50% effective dose (ED<sub>50</sub> ), ED<sub>25</sub> , and ED<sub>75</sub> ], naloxone displayed a greater duration of cutaneous analgesic action than lidocaine (p<0.01).
  • Coadministration of lidocaine (ED<sub>95</sub> or ED<sub>50</sub> ) and ineffective-dose naloxone (13.3 μmol/kg) intensifies sensory block (p<0.01) with prolonged duration of action (p<0.001) compared with lidocaine (ED<sub>95</sub> or ED<sub>50</sub> ) alone or naloxone (13.3 μmol/kg) alone on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia.
  • Furthermore, naloxone prolongs lidocaine analgesia, acting synergistically for nociceptive block.

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  • [Copyright] This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28677297.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-8206
  • [Journal-full-title] Fundamental & clinical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fundam Clin Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Lidocaine / Naloxone / coadministration / infiltrative cutaneous analgesia / subcutaneous injection
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50. Chanawong A, Mackenzie PI, McKinnon RA, Hu DG, Meech R: Exemestane and Its Active Metabolite 17-Hydroexemestane Induce UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B17 Expression in Breast Cancer Cells. J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 2017 Jun;361(3):482-491
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  • Exemestane (EXE) is an aromatase inhibitor indicated for endocrine therapy of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.
  • We recently reported that <i>UGT2B17</i> could be induced by both estrogenic and androgenic ligands in breast cancer cells via binding of the estrogen receptor <i>α</i> (ER<i>α</i>) or the androgen receptor (AR) to a complex regulatory unit in the proximal <i>UGT2B17</i> promoter.
  • Using antagonists of ER<i>α</i> and AR as well as inhibition mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) we demonstrate that EXE and 17-HE induce <i>UGT2B17</i> expression primarily via the AR.
  • This result is consistent with previous reports that 17-HE can act as an AR ligand.
  • The up-regulation of <i>UGT2B17</i> by EXE and 17-HE in breast cancer cells might enhance the local metabolism of 17-HE as well as that of endogenous androgens, hence impacting potentially on treatment outcomes.

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  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. EXEMESTANE .
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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
  • (PMID = 28404691.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0103
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androstadienes; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Aromatase Inhibitors; 0 / Minor Histocompatibility Antigens; EC 2.4.1.17 / Glucuronosyltransferase; EC 2.4.1.17 / UGT2B17 protein, human; NY22HMQ4BX / exemestane
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51. Ogawa R, Akaishi S: Endothelial dysfunction may play a key role in keloid and hypertrophic scar pathogenesis - Keloids and hypertrophic scars may be vascular disorders. Med Hypotheses; 2016 Nov;96:51-60

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The pathogenesis of these scars clearly involves local conditions such as delayed wound healing, wound depth, and the tension of the skin around the scars.
  • Scar severity is also shaped by interactions between these local factors and genetic and systemic factors such as hypertension and sex hormones.
  • Our studies show that tension on the skin around the wound results in prolonged and/or repeated bouts of inflammation in the reticular layer of the dermis and that this inflammation generates abnormal numbers of blood vessels (as well as collagen and nerve fibers) in the dermal reticular layer.
  • We hypothesize that local factors, such as the mechanobiology of the dermis and blood vessels, along with genetic and systemic factors promote pathological scar development by inducing endothelial dysfunction (i.e., vascular hyperpermeability) during the inflammatory stage of wound healing.
  • Evidence for this hypothesis includes the fact that all effective treatments of keloids, namely, radiotherapy, compression therapy, steroid administration, and long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser therapy, act, at least partly, by suppressing blood vessels.
  • Thus, primary scars are caused by congenital endothelial dysfunction (e.g., a mutation prevents endothelial gaps from closing smoothly) while secondary scars are caused by endothelial dysfunction that results from aging, arterial sclerosis, and/or repeated/very strong local mechanical forces.
  • Thus, abnormal blood vessel regulation may underlie keloid and hypertrophic scar pathogenesis, which suggests that inhibiting abnormal angiogenesis and vascular hyperpermeability may be an important therapeutic approach.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 27959277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2777
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical hypotheses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Hypotheses
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Guerra ES, Lee CK, Specht CA, Yadav B, Huang H, Akalin A, Huh JR, Mueller C, Levitz SM: Central Role of IL-23 and IL-17 Producing Eosinophils as Immunomodulatory Effector Cells in Acute Pulmonary Aspergillosis and Allergic Asthma. PLoS Pathog; 2017 Jan;13(1):e1006175
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • By in vivo intracellular cytokine staining and confocal microscopy, we observed that eosinophils act as local sources of IL-23 and IL-17.
  • Given the postulated role for IL-17 in asthma pathogenesis, we assessed whether eosinophils could act as sources of IL-23 and IL-17 in models where mice were sensitized to either A. fumigatus antigens or ovalbumin (OVA).
  • These data establish a new paradigm in acute and allergic aspergillosis whereby eosinophils act not only as effector cells but also as immunomodulatory cells driving the IL-23/IL-17 axis and contributing to inflammatory cell recruitment.

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  • (PMID = 28095479.001).
  • [ISSN] 1553-7374
  • [Journal-full-title] PLoS pathogens
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS Pathog.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / T32 AI095213
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. d'Elbée M, Baumevieille M, Dumartin C: [Cooperation according to French Law "hospital, patients, health and territories": Pharmacists' involvement in Aquitaine region]. Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique; 2017 Jun;65(3):231-239

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Missions de coopération introduites par la loi « hôpital, patients, santé et territoires » : participation des pharmaciens d’officine en Aquitaine.
  • BACKGROUND: In 2009, the French Act "Hospital, Patients, Health and Territories" (loi "Hôpital, Patients, Santé et Territoires") reorganized the outpatient care pathway and defined missions aimed at improving cooperation between pharmaceutical and medical professionals.
  • METHODS: In partnership with the local health authorities "Agence régionale de santé", we conducted a survey via an online questionnaire sent to pharmacy holders in July 2014 in Aquitaine region.
  • Regarding collaborative activities, the majority of pharmacists (78%) had conducted interviews with their patients taking vitamin K antagonist therapy and they were willing to continue (87%).
  • The main obstacles for engaging in these activities were the lack of time, lack of knowledge about these missions and the lack of remuneration.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28262371.001).
  • [ISSN] 0398-7620
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue d'epidemiologie et de sante publique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Enquête sur les services de santé / Health care survey / Parcours de soins coordonnés / Partnership practice / Pharmacies / Pharmacist / Public health / Santé publique
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54. Cheng KJ, Wang SQ, Xu YY: Different roles of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> enterotoxin in different subtypes of nasal polyps. Exp Ther Med; 2017 Jan;13(1):321-326

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Different roles of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> enterotoxin in different subtypes of nasal polyps.
  • This study was designed to investigate the role of inflammation and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> enterotoxin (SE) in this disease.
  • The supernatant ECP and MPO levels were elevated in the CRSwNP group compared with the control group, but no significant difference in the serum total IgE and ECP levels were observed between the CRSwNP and control groups.
  • In addition, the non-eosinophilic and eosinophilic CRSwNP groups showed significant elevations in supernatant total IgE, SEA and SEB levels compared with the control group.
  • Additionally, local indicators reflect the inflammatory status more accurately than do serum indicators.
  • SEs may act as an infection factor rather than as a superantigen in Chinese non-eosinophilic CRSwNP patients.
  • Thus, long-term antibiotic therapy may be an option for Chinese non-eosinophilic CRSwNP patients.

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  • (PMID = 28123509.001).
  • [ISSN] 1792-0981
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental and therapeutic medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp Ther Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin / chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps / eosinophil cationic protein / myeloperoxidase / superantigen
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55. Yu B, Ma Z, Guan C, Liu G, Ding H, Yin Y, Han W, Taimei Baofa Cancer Hospital: Clinical introtumoral chemoimmunotherapy for late stages of lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2011 May 20;29(15_suppl):e21001

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e21001 Background: Currently cancer therapy is not satisfied with the effectiveness of available treatment.
  • Therefore, it resulted in one year survial rate is 36%(treated) compared 14%(control) with P<0.05.in addition to the innovation for sustained drug release, more importantly, ChemoVac provides a new option for cancer treatment by integrating local chemotherapeutic effect with systemic anti-tumor immunity; cell death induced by chemotherapeutic drugs is a priming event and allows the injected tumor act as its own vaccine.

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  • (PMID = 28022345.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Wagner RH, Savir-Baruch B, Gabriel MS, Halama JR, Bova D: Managing Written Directives: A Software Solution to Streamline Workflow. J Nucl Med Technol; 2017 Jun;45(2):96-101

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Nuclear Regulatory Commission for any use of <sup>131</sup>I above 1.11 MBq (30 μCi) and for patients receiving radiopharmaceutical therapy.
  • As the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals increases therapeutic options in nuclear medicine, time spent on regulatory paperwork also increases.
  • The pressure of managing these time-consuming regulatory requirements may heighten the potential for inaccurate or incomplete directive data and subsequent regulatory violations.
  • To improve on the paper-trail method of directive management, we created a software tool using a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant database.
  • This software allows for secure data-sharing among physicians, technologists, and managers while saving time, reducing errors, and eliminating the possibility of loss and duplication.
  • <b>Methods:</b> The software tool was developed using Visual Basic, which is part of the Visual Studio development environment for the Windows platform.
  • Patient data are deposited in an Access database on a local HIPAA-compliant secure server or hard disk.
  • <b>Results:</b> The software has been used at our institution for over 2 y and has reliably kept track of all directives.
  • <b>Conclusion:</b> We have developed a software solution for the management of written directives that streamlines and structures the departmental workflow.
  • This solution saves time, centralizes the information for all staff to share, and decreases confusion about the creation, completion, filing, and retrieval of directives.

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  • [Copyright] © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.
  • (PMID = 28280130.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-5675
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine technology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nucl Med Technol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; regulatory compliance / software / written directive
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57. Haddad RI, Gokhale AS, Wirth L, Weeks L, Faucher J, Hallar M, Cavacini LA, Posner MR: Interleukin-8 (IL-8) serum levels and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9716

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • These cytokines act through pro-angiogenic and mitogenic effects.
  • Active co-morbid illnesses, addictions, use of steroids or NSAIDS, or active anticancer therapy immediately prior to sampling were exclusion criteria.
  • 7/7 NV and 4/5 NED had levels < 20 pg/ml (mean of 13 and 15, respectively).
  • In the RD group, 12/15 with metastatic disease (MD) and 4/5 with local regional recurrence (LRR) had IL-8 levels of > 20 (mean 44 and 29, respectively).
  • It is possible that serum IL-8 can be used as a prognostic test in patients with ND or at risk for recurrence.
  • IL-8 may also be a potential therapeutic target to control tumor growth and metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 28016407.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Sarmento-Cabral A, L-López F, Gahete MD, Castaño JP, Luque RM: Metformin Reduces Prostate Tumor Growth, in a Diet-Dependent Manner, by Modulating Multiple Signaling Pathways. Mol Cancer Res; 2017 Jul;15(7):862-874
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • To determine the beneficial antitumoral effects of metformin on prostate cancer progression/aggressiveness and the relative contribution of high-fat diet (HFD; independently of obesity), we used HFD-fed immunosuppressed mice inoculated with PC3 cells (which exhibited partial resistance to diet-induced obesity) compared with low-fat diet (LFD)-fed control mice.
  • The results demonstrate that HFD is associated with enhanced prostate cancer growth irrespective of body weight gain and endocrine metabolic dysregulations and that metformin can reduce prostate cancer growth under LFD but more prominently under HFD, acting through the modulation of several tumoral-associated processes (e.g., cell cycle, apoptosis, and/or necrosis).
  • Moreover, the actions observed <i>in vivo</i> could be mediated by the modulation of the local expression of GH/IGF1 axis components.
  • <b>Implications:</b> The current study linking dietary influence on metformin-regulated signaling pathways and antitumoral response provides new and critical insight on environment-host interactions in cancer and therapy.
  • <i>Mol Cancer Res; 15(7); 862-74.
  • ©2017 AACR</i>.

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  • [Copyright] ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.
  • (PMID = 28385910.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-3125
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer research : MCR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. ACTwatch Group, Newton PN, Hanson K, Goodman C: Do anti-malarials in Africa meet quality standards? The market penetration of non quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy in eight African countries. Malar J; 2017 May 25;16(1):204

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Do anti-malarials in Africa meet quality standards? The market penetration of non quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy in eight African countries.
  • BACKGROUND: Quality of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is important for ensuring malaria parasite clearance and protecting the efficacy of artemisinin-based therapies.
  • The extent to which non quality-assured ACT (non-QAACT), or those not granted global regulatory approval, are available and used to treat malaria in endemic countries is poorly documented.
  • Given the variation in non-QAACT markets observed across the eight study countries, active efforts to limit registration, importation and distribution of non-QAACT must be tailored to the country context, and will involve addressing complex and challenging aspects of medicine registration, private sector pharmaceutical regulation, local manufacturing and drug importation.
  • These efforts may be critical not only to patient health and safety, but also to effective malaria control and protection of artemisinin drug efficacy in the face of spreading resistance.

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  • (PMID = 28539125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2875
  • [Journal-full-title] Malaria journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Malar. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ACT / Anti-malarial / Medicine quality / Regulation
  • [Investigator] Akulayi L; Alum A; Andrada A; Archer J; Arogundade ED; Auko E; Badru AR; Bates K; Bouanchaud P; Bruce M; Bruxvoort K; Buyungo P; Camilleri A; Carter ED; Chapman S; Charman N; Chavasse D; Cyr R; Duff K; Esch K; Evance I; Fulton A; Gataaka H; Guedegbe G; Haslam T; Harris E; Hong C; Hurley C; Isenhower W; Kaabunga E; Kaaya BD; Kabui E; Kangwana B; Kapata L; Kaula H; Kigo G; Kyomuhangi I; Lailari A; LeFevre S; Littrell M; Martin G; Michael D; Monroe E; Mpanya G; Mpasela F; Mulama F; Musuva A; Ngigi J; Ngoma E; Norman M; Nyauchi B; O'Connell KA; Ochieng C; Ogada E; Ongwenyi L; Orford R; Phanalasy S; Poyer S; Rahariniaina J; Raharinjatovo J; Razafindralambo L; Razakamiadana S; Riley C; Rodgers J; Rusk A; Shewchuk T; Sensalire S; Smith J; Sochea P; Solomon T; Sudoi R; Tassiba ME; Thanel K; Thompson R; Toda M; Ujuju C; Valensi MA; Vasireddy V; Whitman CB; Zinsou C
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60. Nikan M, Osborn MF, Coles AH, Godinho BM, Hall LM, Haraszti RA, Hassler MR, Echeverria D, Aronin N, Khvorova A: Docosahexaenoic Acid Conjugation Enhances Distribution and Safety of siRNA upon Local Administration in Mouse Brain. Mol Ther Nucleic Acids; 2016;5:e344

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Docosahexaenoic Acid Conjugation Enhances Distribution and Safety of siRNA upon Local Administration in Mouse Brain.
  • Importantly, DHA-hsiRNAs do not induce neural cell death or measurable innate immune activation following administration of concentrations over 20 times above the efficacious dose.
  • Thus, DHA conjugation is a novel strategy for improving siRNA activity in mouse brain, with potential to act as a new therapeutic platform for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 Official journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28131259.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy. Nucleic acids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Ther Nucleic Acids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; drug delivery / neurodegenerative disease / siRNA
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61. Schulzeck S, Wulf H: [Local therapy with capsaicin or ASS in chronic pain]. Schmerz; 1997 Oct 24;11(5):345-52
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  • [Title] [Local therapy with capsaicin or ASS in chronic pain].
  • OBJECTIVE: To provide a brief review of the current state of topical treatment with capsaicin or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for therapy of chronic pain syndromes.
  • Because of its effects, it is obvious to try for the therapy of circumscribed neuropathic pain.
  • Capsaicin acts by depleting stores of substance P and other neurotransmitters, resulting in a blockade of a specific group of sensory afferents.
  • Therefore, and because clinical efficacy and advantages over other therapies have not been demonstrated up to now, capsaicin cannot be classified as standard therapy.
  • Therefore, topical ASA therapy for (post)herpetic neuralgia is mainly based on a few enthusiastic case reports rather than on well founded investigations.
  • Furthermore, the discrimination of local from systemic effects, the toxicological profile of longterm topical treatment, and the mechanism of action has not been evaluated.

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  • (PMID = 12799806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0932-433X
  • [Journal-full-title] Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Schmerz
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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62. Antoniu SA: Inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: systemic effects of a local therapy? Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2008 Dec;9(18):3271-3
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  • [Title] Inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: systemic effects of a local therapy?
  • OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the systemic anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled corticosteroids alone or in combination with long acting beta2-agonists.

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  • [CommentOn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Jun 1;177(11):1207-14 [18310480.001]
  • (PMID = 19040347.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7666
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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63. Sudanese A, Avella M, Toni A, Boriani S, Baldini N, Monesi M, Battistini A, Mancini A, Campanacci M: [Therapy of non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (pelvis excluded). Results obtained in 48 cases combining local therapy (radiation and/or surgical) and adjuvant chemotherapy with vincristine, adriamycin, dactinomycin and cyclophosphamide]. Minerva Med; 1987 Apr 15;78(7):473-82
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  • [Title] [Therapy of non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (pelvis excluded). Results obtained in 48 cases combining local therapy (radiation and/or surgical) and adjuvant chemotherapy with vincristine, adriamycin, dactinomycin and cyclophosphamide].
  • [Transliterated title] Terapia del sarcoma di Ewing non metastatico (pelvi esclusa). Risultati ottenuti in 48 casi associando alla terapia locale (radiante e/o chirurgica) una chemioterapia adiuvante con vincristina, adriamicina, dactinomicina e ciclofosfamide.
  • Combined therapy was used on a consecutive series of 48 patients with extrapelvic Ewing's sarcoma at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute.
  • The adjuvant chemotherapy protocol (VCR, ADM, D-ACT, EDX) was identical in all patients whereas local treatment consisted of amputation, resection and radiation treatment or radiation alone.
  • As far as the type of local treatment is concerned, the percentage of local recurrences and metastases was lower when the primary lesion was treated with surgery or surgery combined with radiotherapy, rather than radiation treatment alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 3574734.001).
  • [ISSN] 0026-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Med.
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ITALY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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64. deVere White R: Nonsurgical management of patients with stage D1 adenocarcinoma of prostate: risks vs benefits. Urology; 1984 Nov;24(5 Suppl):12-5
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  • Any purely local therapy (e.g., radical prostatectomy) appears to offer little in terms of the risk:benefit ratio.
  • However, some form of local therapy is appropriate, since the untreated primary may continue to act as a source of metastases.
  • 125I implantation with concomitant systemic therapy is an excellent therapeutic option for the majority of these patients.
  • If one accepts the premise that local therapy is of limited value in metastatic disease, systemic treatment at the time of initial diagnosis should be considered.
  • According to the data presented by the Mayo Clinic Group, immediate orchiectomy may be the best form of therapy.
  • An alternative to orchiectomy is estrogen therapy or the more recently introduced GnRH analogues.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 6541825.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-4295
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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65. Palacios S, Castelo-Branco C, Cancelo MJ, Vázquez F: Low-dose, vaginally administered estrogens may enhance local benefits of systemic therapy in the treatment of urogenital atrophy in postmenopausal women on hormone therapy. Maturitas; 2005 Feb 14;50(2):98-104
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  • [Title] Low-dose, vaginally administered estrogens may enhance local benefits of systemic therapy in the treatment of urogenital atrophy in postmenopausal women on hormone therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: When genital atrophy exists, systemic hormone therapy (HT) has a timing until to induce vaginal proliferation and symptomatic relieve.
  • Thus, in order to obtain a prompt improvement, the association of local therapy acting on the genital epithelium to the systemic treatment should be considered.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a combined therapy consisting of vaginal estriol with transdermal 17-beta-estradiol (50 microg/day) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (5 mg/day) per os in shortening the period of uro-genital symptoms.
  • Patients use the local medication daily for the first 3 weeks and twice-weekly thereafter.
  • In the first visit, electible patients after written informed consent were randomized to receive HT plus local estriol or placebo.
  • All the subjects had baseline studies, including medical history, physical examination, blood and urine analysis.
  • In order to evaluate the effect of local treatment on urinary and genital symptoms, a score for genital, urinary and colposcopic complaints (0 minimum-100 maximum) was developed.
  • This score and Blatt-Kuperman were recorded and performed in every control.
  • Additionally, the improvement in urinary symptoms at the end of the study was similar for both groups (from 16.5 +/- 6.1 to 8.5 +/- 2.4 for E group and from 15.8 +/- 7.8 to 8.8 +/- 2.7 for P group; P < 0.01 versus basal); however, those women in group E reached significant improvement on urinary complaints since the first month of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Estriol / therapeutic use. Postmenopause / physiology. Urologic Diseases / drug therapy. Vagina / pathology. Vaginal Diseases / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Administration, Intravaginal. Adult. Atrophy / drug therapy. Colposcopy. Contraceptive Agents, Female / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Estradiol / therapeutic use. Estrogen Replacement Therapy. Female. Humans. Medroxyprogesterone Acetate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Papanicolaou Test. Treatment Outcome. Vaginal Creams, Foams, and Jellies. Vaginal Smears

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  • (PMID = 15653006.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-5122
  • [Journal-full-title] Maturitas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Maturitas
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contraceptive Agents, Female; 0 / Vaginal Creams, Foams, and Jellies; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; C2QI4IOI2G / Medroxyprogesterone Acetate; FB33469R8E / Estriol
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66. Cheng L, Hostetler KY, Gardner MF, Avila CP Jr, Bergeron-Lynn G, Severson GM, Freeman WR: Intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbits of the foscarnet lipid prodrug: 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphonoformate (ODG-PFA). Curr Eye Res; 1999 Mar;18(3):161-7
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  • The retinal level of the drug was 292 microM at day one, 75 microM at the fifth week and 32 microM at the tenth week, which was still more than ten times higher than the IC90 against HCMV.
  • Intravitreal liposomal ODG-PFA may be expected to be a long acting potent local therapy for CMV retinitis.

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  • (PMID = 10342370.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-3683
  • [Journal-full-title] Current eye research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Eye Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY 11832; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EYO 7366
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphonoformate; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Phospholipid Ethers; 0 / Prodrugs; 364P9RVW4X / Foscarnet
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67. Sealy PI, Nguyen C, Tucci M, Benghuzzi H, Cleary JD: Delivery of antifungal agents using bioactive and nonbioactive bone cements. Ann Pharmacother; 2009 Oct;43(10):1606-15
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  • Antifungal-impregnated cement is sometimes used as adjunctive therapy.
  • Ceramic nonabsorbable impregnated devices must be removed after their lifespan expires and may necessitate another surgical procedure that can increase surgical risk and cost.
  • However, there have been no controlled trials demonstrating improved therapeutic outcomes with local therapy and assessing whether biodegradable materials act as a new focus for infection.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Calcium / blood. Calcium / metabolism. Calcium Phosphates / chemistry. Cattle. Cells, Cultured. Delayed-Action Preparations. Humans. Hydroxyapatites / chemistry. In Vitro Techniques. Osteoblasts / drug effects. Osteoblasts / metabolism. Osteomyelitis / drug therapy. Osteomyelitis / microbiology. Polymethyl Methacrylate / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 19755620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-6270
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Bone Cements; 0 / Calcium Phosphates; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Hydroxyapatites; 0 / beta-tricalcium phosphate; 0 / hydroxyapatite cement; 9011-14-7 / Polymethyl Methacrylate; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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68. Etienne J, Dorme N, Bourg-Heckly G, Raimbert P, Fékété F: [Local curative treatment of superficial adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. First results of photodynamic therapy with a new photosensitizer]. Bull Acad Natl Med; 2000;184(8):1731-44; discussion 1744-7
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  • [Title] [Local curative treatment of superficial adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. First results of photodynamic therapy with a new photosensitizer].
  • [Transliterated title] Traitement curatif local des adénocarcinomes superficiels sur endobrachyoesophage. Premiers résultats de thérapie photodynamique avec un nouveau photosensibilisateur.
  • Pre-cancerous lesions and mucosally confined superficial cancers can benefit from local therapy given with curative intent due to the absence of near metastatic lymph nodes.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) which acts by laser irradiation with an appropriate wave-length after administration of a photosensitiser retained preferentially by the cancerous tissue can destroy tumour cells selectively, but its efficiency depends upon the photosensitiser.
  • Irradiation time was 12,5 mn.
  • Temoporfin has contributed notably to the field of photodynamic therapy compared to previously used sensitisers.
  • Subject to validation of the method on a greater number of patients, the first results obtained on superficial cancer in Barrett's aesophagus allow us to propose green light Temoporfin PDT as an alternative first line therapy with curative intent.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / etiology. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Barrett Esophagus / complications. Esophageal Neoplasms / etiology. Esophageal Neoplasms / therapy. Mesoporphyrins / therapeutic use. Photochemotherapy / methods. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Precancerous Conditions / etiology. Precancerous Conditions / therapy

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  • (PMID = 11471391.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-4079
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin de l'Académie nationale de médecine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull. Acad. Natl. Med.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mesoporphyrins; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; FU21S769PF / temoporfin
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69. Baldini E, Gardin G, Giannessi PG, Evangelista G, Roncella M, Prochilo T, Collecchi P, Rosso R, Lionetto R, Bruzzi P, Mosca F, Conte PF: Accelerated versus standard cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil or cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil: a randomized phase III trial in locally advanced breast cancer. Ann Oncol; 2003 Feb;14(2):227-32
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  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dose-dense primary chemotherapy on pathological response rate (pCR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) treated with combined modality therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Stage IIIA/IIIB patients received three courses of induction chemotherapy (ICT) with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) followed by local therapy (total mastectomy or segmental mastectomy with axillary nodes dissection) and adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) with three courses of CEF alternated with three courses of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil (CMF).
  • Patients were randomized to receive ICT and ACT every 3 weeks (arm A, 'standard treatment') or every 2 weeks with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) support (arm B, 'dose-dense treatment').
  • Median duration of treatment (ICT+local+ACT) was 183 days (range 0-265) in arm A and 139 days (0-226) in arm B.
  • Median overall survival was 7.8 years in standard therapy: this figure has not yet been reached in the dose-dense treatment.

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  • (PMID = 12562649.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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70. Urushizaki I: [Palliative therapy in cancer. 6. Quality of life and BRM therapy in cancer-patients]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 1990 Oct;17(10):2119-29
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  • [Title] [Palliative therapy in cancer. 6. Quality of life and BRM therapy in cancer-patients].
  • In recent years, various fields of cancer therapy have seen the development and application of treatment modalities which take into account the quality of the patients.
  • Systemic administration of exogenous cytokines to act against a tumor at a distant site may not be as successful as more localized therapy in situation.
  • In most circumstances, cytokines are produced transiently at a local site acting in an autocrine or paracrine manner.
  • So, the local injections of TNF and LAK cells are effective to decrease tumor size without the side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / therapy. Palliative Care. Quality of Life
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Cytokines / blood. Cytokines / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunotherapy, Adoptive

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  • (PMID = 1699499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Immunologic Factors
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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71. Oden ZM, Selvitelli DM, Bouxsein ML: Effect of local density changes on the failure load of the proximal femur. J Orthop Res; 1999 Sep;17(5):661-7
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  • [Title] Effect of local density changes on the failure load of the proximal femur.
  • Presently, all therapies approved for treatment and prevention of osteoporosis involve pharmacological agents that act systemically.
  • In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of preventing osteoporotic hip fractures with local, rather than systemic, therapy.
  • Our hypothesis is that local therapy to increase bone density may be as effective as systemic therapy in reducing fracture risk.
  • Thus, the goal of this investigation was to use finite element analyses to study the effect of a localized increase in bone density on the strength of an osteopenic, human femur.

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  • [CommentIn] J Orthop Res. 2000 Mar;18(2):337 [10815838.001]
  • (PMID = 10569474.001).
  • [ISSN] 0736-0266
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Orthop. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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72. Vokes EE, Panje WR, Weichselbaum RR, Schilsky RL, Moran WJ, Awan AM, Guarnieri CM: Concomitant hydroxyurea, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation therapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: early results. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 1988 Apr;98(4):295-8
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  • [Title] Concomitant hydroxyurea, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation therapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: early results.
  • Both drugs are effective single agents, have shown synergistic activity in vitro, and can act as radiation sensitizers.
  • Sixteen patients have completed their therapy.
  • Eleven patients had recurrent disease after previous therapy with surgery (11 patients), radiotherapy (9 patients), and combination chemotherapy (4 patients).
  • Five patients had not received previous local therapy.
  • Of 15 patients evaluable for response, 9 had complete response, including 5 patients who had earlier local therapy; 5 had partial response; and 1 failed to respond.
  • This regimen has shown impressive activity in a cohort of patients who are not usually responsive to other types of currently available therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Hydroxyurea / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, High-Energy

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  • (PMID = 3132681.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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73. Babiĭ IaS, Bezhenar AA, Gladkiĭ AV: [Lung study in bronchial asthma using x-ray pneumopolygraphy]. Vrach Delo; 1989 Jan;(1):69-70
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  • Roentgenpneumopolygraphy (RPPG) was used to examine 48 patients with bronchial asthma and all patients showed a reduction of one or several indices of zonal ventilation and/or biomechanics of the respiratory act.
  • But most patients revealed local disorders of ventilation resistant to the effect of broncholytic agents.
  • Local therapy of the corresponding lung regions produced a positive effect.

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  • (PMID = 2718453.001).
  • [ISSN] 0049-6804
  • [Journal-full-title] Vrachebnoe delo
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vrach Delo
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] USSR
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bronchodilator Agents
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74. Hill JS, Kahl SB, Stylli SS, Nakamura Y, Koo MS, Kaye AH: Selective tumor kill of cerebral glioma by photodynamic therapy using a boronated porphyrin photosensitizer. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 1995 Dec 19;92(26):12126-30
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  • [Title] Selective tumor kill of cerebral glioma by photodynamic therapy using a boronated porphyrin photosensitizer.
  • The median survival for primary tumors is < 12 months, with most recurring at the site of the original tumor, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required to eradicate the unresectable "nests" of tumor cells invading into adjacent brain.
  • Two adjuvant therapies with the potential to destroy these cells are porphyrin-sensitized photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron-sensitized boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).
  • The ability of a boronated porphyrin, 2,4-(alpha, beta-dihydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX tetrakiscarborane carboxylate ester (BOPP), to act as a photosensitizing agent was investigated in vitro with the C6 rat glioma cell line and in vivo with C6 cells grown as an intracerebral tumor after implantation into Wistar rats.

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  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1980 Dec 4;303(23):1323-9 [7001230.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1979 Jun 28;300(26):1469-71 [221807.001]
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  • (PMID = 8618857.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-8424
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 37961
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2,4-(alpha,beta-dihydroxyethyl)deuteroporphyrin IX tetrakiscarborane carboxylate ester; 0 / Boron Compounds; 0 / Deuteroporphyrins; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 68335-15-9 / Hematoporphyrin Derivative
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC40309
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75. James PP, Mead GM: Sanctuary site relapse in chemotherapy-treated testicular cancer. Ann Oncol; 1992 Jan;3(1):41-3
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  • The testis and central nervous system (CNS) may act as sanctuary sites for testicular germ cell tumours, as cytotoxic drugs penetrate these areas less well than systemic sites.
  • Two patients were rendered disease-free; one died of progression of his local disease only.
  • Sanctuary site tumour should be considered when relapse occurs in the setting of otherwise chemosensitive disease; local therapy may be curative.

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  • (PMID = 1376616.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins
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76. Stüttgen G: [Results and consequences of long-term urea therapy for clinical practice]. Hautarzt; 1992;43 Suppl 11:9-12
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. UREA .

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  • [Title] [Results and consequences of long-term urea therapy for clinical practice].
  • In the development of clinical symptoms of atopic constitutional neurodermatitis, the application of urea can 1. regulate corneal layer lipids by hydrating the corneal layer and influencing transepidermal water loss, 2. reduce itching via inhibition of tryptic enzymes in the skin and, 3. diminish the susceptibility of the skin to infection by directly acting on the cell membranes of bacteria and fungi.
  • In the present study, the combination of urea and hydrocortisone was used for acute attacks and urea ointment for chronic therapy.
  • Urea therapy in the form of a hydrocortisone-urea ointment represents an effective and low-side effect therapy of this type of chronic dermatosis.
  • Local therapy with other corticosteroids was only reported as necessary in 16% of the cases.
  • In addition to its special properties in the therapy of neurodermatitis, urea also ranks high as a physiological substitution.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatitis, Atopic / drug therapy. Urea / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Drug Combinations. Humans. Hydrocortisone. Ointments. Pruritus / drug therapy. Water Loss, Insensible / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 1555945.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-8470
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hautarzt
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Ointments; 8W8T17847W / Urea; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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77. Prieur AM: [Drug therapy of inflammatory arthritis in children]. Rev Prat; 1994 Dec 1;44(19):2593-9
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  • [Title] [Drug therapy of inflammatory arthritis in children].
  • [Transliterated title] Traitements médicamenteux des arthrites inflammatoires de l'enfant.
  • Slow acting antirheumatic drugs are mostly used in the polyarticular subtype.
  • Oligoarticular subtype, the long term prognosis of which is fair, is a good indication to local therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Arthritis / drug therapy. Arthritis, Juvenile / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 7855528.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-2640
  • [Journal-full-title] La Revue du praticien
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Prat
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
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78. Frommelt L: Principles of systemic antimicrobial therapy in foreign material associated infection in bone tissue, with special focus on periprosthetic infection. Injury; 2006 May;37 Suppl 2:S87-94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Principles of systemic antimicrobial therapy in foreign material associated infection in bone tissue, with special focus on periprosthetic infection.
  • Foreign material associated infection in bone tissue is mostly characterized by the features of sessile pathogens acting from the foreign material surface.
  • Therapy is based on surgical revision, with removal of the foreign material and supplementary antimicrobial therapy.
  • Empirical antimicrobial therapy cannot be recommended unless life threatening septicemia occurs.
  • Therefore, antibiotics must be administered in high dosage for an extended period of time.
  • The options of antimicrobial therapy are: 1.
  • 3. Surgical revision with retention of the foreign material and long-term antibiotic therapy including rifampicin: This procedure is possible in early, not yet established foreign material infections.
  • 4. Treatment of the periprosthetic infection: Surgical revision with exchange of the prosthesis combined with systemic (and optional local) therapy, regardless whether the revision is performed in 1 - or multiple-stages.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Infective Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Diseases, Infectious / drug therapy. Postoperative Complications / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Device Removal. Humans. Osteomyelitis / drug therapy. Prostheses and Implants / adverse effects. Prosthesis-Related Infections / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16651077.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-1383
  • [Journal-full-title] Injury
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Injury
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Infective Agents
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79. Spies CM, Burmester GR, Buttgereit F: Analyses of similarities and differences in glucocorticoid therapy between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis - a systematic comparison. Clin Exp Rheumatol; 2009 Jul-Aug;27(4 Suppl 55):S152-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Steroids.

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  • [Title] Analyses of similarities and differences in glucocorticoid therapy between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis - a systematic comparison.
  • In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), GCs are used systemically at several different dosages and/or local (intraarticular) therapy.
  • In comparison, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are considered to be less responsive to GC therapy than patients with RA, although controlled studies on the effects of low-dose GCs in AS are lacking.
  • In AS, GCs are mainly used for local therapy and occasionally for systemic pulse therapy only.
  • GCs act on primary and secondary immune cells via different mechanisms of action: cytosolic GC receptor (cGCR)-mediated genomic and non-genomic effects, membrane-bound GC receptor (mGCR)-mediated non-genomic effects and - as achieved at very high concentrations - non-specific non-genomic effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antirheumatic Agents / therapeutic use. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Spondylitis, Ankylosing / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Arthrography. Disease Progression. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance / drug effects. Humans. Immune System / cytology. Immune System / drug effects. Injections, Intra-Articular. Pulse Therapy, Drug. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / drug effects. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / metabolism


80. Oliveira-Ferrer L, Wellbrock J, Bartsch U, Penas EM, Hauschild J, Klokow M, Bokemeyer C, Fiedler W, Schuch G: Combination therapy targeting integrins reduces glioblastoma tumor growth through antiangiogenic and direct antitumor activity and leads to activation of the pro-proliferative prolactin pathway. Mol Cancer; 2013;12(1):144
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • [Title] Combination therapy targeting integrins reduces glioblastoma tumor growth through antiangiogenic and direct antitumor activity and leads to activation of the pro-proliferative prolactin pathway.
  • Microencapsulated PAE-cells producing these inhibitors were applied for local therapy in a subcutaneous glioblastoma model.
  • CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that integrin-targeting factors endostatin and tumstatin act additively by inhibiting glioblastoma growth via reduction of vessel density but also directly by affecting proliferation and viability of tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Integrins / metabolism. Receptors, Prolactin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 24257371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4598
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Autoantigens; 0 / Collagen Type IV; 0 / Endostatins; 0 / Integrins; 0 / Receptors, Prolactin; 0 / type IV collagen alpha3 chain
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4176123
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81. Gratieri T, Pujol-Bello E, Gelfuso GM, de Souza JG, Lopez RF, Kalia YN: Iontophoretic transport kinetics of ketorolac in vitro and in vivo: demonstrating local enhanced topical drug delivery to muscle. Eur J Pharm Biopharm; 2014 Feb;86(2):219-26

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Iontophoretic transport kinetics of ketorolac in vitro and in vivo: demonstrating local enhanced topical drug delivery to muscle.
  • The objective of the study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery kinetics of ketorolac (KT), a highly potent NSAID and peripherally-acting analgesic that is currently indicated to treat moderate to severe acute pain.
  • It was envisaged that, depending on the amounts delivered, transdermal iontophoretic administration might have two distinct therapeutic applications: (i) more effective and faster local therapy with shorter onset times (e.g. to treat trauma-related pain/inflammation in muscle) or (ii) a non-parenteral, gastrointestinal tract sparing approach for systemic pain relief.
  • Subsequent experiments, in male Wistar rats, investigated the local enhancement of KT delivery to muscle by iontophoresis.
  • Iontophoretic administration for 30min was superior to passive topical delivery for 1h and resulted in statistically significant increases in KT levels in the skin (91.04±15.48 vs. 20.16±8.58μg/cm(2)), in the biceps femoris at the treatment site (TM; 6.74±3.80 vs. <LOQ), in the contralateral site (NTM; 1.26±0.54 vs. <LOQ) and in plasma (P; 8.58±2.37μg/ml vs. <LOD).
  • In addition to increasing bioavailability, iontophoretic administration of KT showed clear selectivity for local delivery to the biceps femoris at the treatment site - the TM:NTM ratio was 5.26±1.45, and the TM:P and NTM:P ratios were 0.75±0.32 and 0.14±0.04, respectively.
  • In conclusion, the results demonstrate that iontophoresis of ketorolac enables local enhanced topical delivery to subjacent muscle; this may have clinical application in the treatment of localised inflammation and pain.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Animals. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Humans. Iontophoresis / methods. Kinetics. Male. Pain / drug therapy. Permeability. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Skin / drug effects. Skin / metabolism. Skin Absorption. Swine. Tissue Distribution

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23791718.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-3441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Pharm Biopharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] YZI5105V0L / Ketorolac
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Iontophoresis / Ketorolac / Local enhanced effect / Muscle / NSAID / Topical delivery
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82. Vokes EE, Panje WR, Schilsky RL, Mick R, Awan AM, Moran WJ, Goldman MD, Tybor AG, Weichselbaum RR: Hydroxyurea, fluorouracil, and concomitant radiotherapy in poor-prognosis head and neck cancer: a phase I-II study. J Clin Oncol; 1989 Jun;7(6):761-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

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  • Both drugs also act as radiosensitizers.
  • Of 15 evaluable patients with recurrent disease after prior local therapy only one failed to respond; six had a complete response (CR), and eight a partial response (PR).
  • Of 17 evaluable patients without prior local therapy, 12 had a CR, with no patient developing recurrence in the irradiated field to date; five patients had a PR.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hydroxyurea / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Bone Marrow / drug effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Evaluation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Stomatitis / etiology

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  • (PMID = 2715806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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83. Friend DR: Review article: issues in oral administration of locally acting glucocorticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther; 1998 Jul;12(7):591-603
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  • [Title] Review article: issues in oral administration of locally acting glucocorticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Inflammatory bowel diseases are treated in some cases by local administration of anti-inflammatory drugs.
  • Local delivery of drugs in the colon following oral administration may lead to improved efficacy/side-effect profiles and may improve patient compliance.
  • This review covers a number of issues important in the design of oral delivery systems of glucocorticosteroids for local therapy of colonic inflammation.
  • These conditions include variations in local pH, transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, the potential role of gut microflora, and drug dissolution in both the healthy and diseased large intestine.
  • [MeSH-major] Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 9701522.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-2813
  • [Journal-full-title] Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 51333-22-3 / Budesonide
  • [Number-of-references] 120
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84. Baum M: Biological considerations in the treatment of breast cancer: the "fall out" from clinical trials. Bull Cancer; 1975 Oct-Dec;62(4):391-400
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  • The recognition that host factors exist which may place a constraint on the spread of cancer, and that haematogenous dissemination may occur long before the tumour has reached clinical proportions, has shaken the whole basis upon which "radical" cancer therapy is based.
  • Prospective randomised clinical trials designed to determine the most effective local treatment have incidentally produced biological "fall out" which has thrown additional light on the behaviour and nature of breast cancer.
  • It transpires that untreated mediastinal or axillary lymph nodes appear to have little growth potential of their own, or is it likely that they act as a reservoir for further metastatic dissemination.
  • It is at last becoming accepted that irrespective of the extent of local therapy, the outcome for "early" breast cancer is predetermined by the extent of subclinical distant metastases at the time of presentation.
  • In order to improve the results therefore, some form of adjuvant systemic therapy is essential.
  • A number of clinical trials are at present underway designed to explore the most effective means of controlling minimal residual cancer following local ablation of the tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Clinical Trials as Topic. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Mastectomy. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Research Design

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  • (PMID = 764902.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-4551
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
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85. Dhingra K: Selective estrogen receptor modulation: the search for an ideal hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Cancer Invest; 2001;19(6):649-59
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Selective estrogen receptor modulation: the search for an ideal hormonal therapy for breast cancer.
  • It has been conclusively demonstrated to reduce the risk of relapse following definitive local therapy (and systemic chemotherapy, when indicated) of invasive or noninvasive breast cancer.
  • The ability of tamoxifen to act as an estrogen-agonist or estrogen-antagonist in a tissue-specific fashion has led to the concept of selective estrogen-receptor modulation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Estrogen Receptor Modulators / therapeutic use. Receptors, Estrogen / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 11486708.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Estrogen Receptor Modulators; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 4F86W47BR6 / Raloxifene Hydrochloride
  • [Number-of-references] 67
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86. Diel IJ: [Therapeutic value of aredia in treatment of breast carcinoma]. Med Klin (Munich); 2000 Oct 15;95 Suppl 2:9-18
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • THERAPY: There are 2 treatment options--local and systemic.
  • Local therapy includes radiotherapy as well as surgical and orthopedic measures.
  • The 4 pillars of systemic treatment are hormone therapy and chemotherapy, antiresorptive therapy with bisphosphonates and treatment with centrally and/or peripherally acting analgesics.
  • It is therefore all the more important to start appropriate therapeutic measures in good time.
  • Rather than replacing antineoplastic therapy, this class of substances supplements other treatments.
  • Once started, bisphosphonate therapy should be given life-long, even in the event of osseous progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11089382.001).
  • [ISSN] 0723-5003
  • [Journal-full-title] Medizinische Klinik (Munich, Germany : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Klin. (Munich)
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; OYY3447OMC / pamidronate
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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87. Diel IJ, Solomayer EF, Bastert G: Treatment of metastatic bone disease in breast cancer: bisphosphonates. Clin Breast Cancer; 2000 Apr;1(1):43-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • There are two treatment options--local and systemic.
  • Local therapy includes radiotherapy as well as surgical and orthopedic measures.
  • The four pillars of systemic treatment are hormone therapy, chemotherapy, antiresorptive therapy with bisphosphonates, and treatment with centrally and/or peripherally acting analgesics.
  • Rather than replacing antineoplastic therapy, this class of substances supplements other treatments.
  • Once started, bisphosphonate therapy should be given for the remainder of the patient's life, even in the event of osseous progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Non-Narcotic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Fractures, Spontaneous / etiology. Fractures, Spontaneous / prevention & control. Hypercalcemia / etiology. Hypercalcemia / prevention & control. Pain / etiology. Pain / prevention & control


88. Perez-Soler R: Liposomes as carriers of antitumor agents: toward a clinical reality. Cancer Treat Rev; 1989 Jun;16(2):67-82
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  • They also have significant potential for local therapy when administered subcutaneously or intraperitoneally.
  • Although liposomal antitumor agents have no established role in the anticancer armamentarium at this stage, the information available suggests that they may improve the therapeutic index or broaden the applications of available antitumor agents and possibly act as carriers for newly designed liposome-dependent antitumor agents.

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  • (PMID = 2670206.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Liposomes
  • [Number-of-references] 73
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89. Kelly MA, Kurzweil PR, Moskowitz RW: Intra-articular hyaluronans in knee osteoarthritis: rationale and practical considerations. Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ); 2004 Feb;33(2 Suppl):15-22
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYALURONIC ACID .

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  • The rationale for the use of hyaluronans therapeutically is based on observations that hyaluronic acid is an important component of the synovial fluid acting as a cushion and lubricant for the joint and also serving as a major component of the extracellular matrix of the cartilage, helping to enhance the ability of cartilage to resist shear and maintain a resiliency to compression.
  • While intra-articular hyaluronans are indicated at this time only for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis of the knee, there are data to suggest that they may also be useful in treating degenerative disease of other articular joints, as well as have an impact on disease progression.
  • The safety profile of intra-articular hyaluronans is very favorable and, because they are used as a local therapy, there are no known drug interactions-an advantage for patients receiving treatment for comorbid conditions.
  • [MeSH-major] Hyaluronic Acid / administration & dosage. Osteoarthritis, Knee / drug therapy. Pain / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15005296.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-4519
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J. Orthop.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9004-61-9 / Hyaluronic Acid
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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90. Kornowski R, Hong MK, Tio FO, Choi SK, Bramwell O, Leon MB: A randomized animal study evaluating the efficacies of locally delivered heparin and urokinase for reducing in-stent restenosis. Coron Artery Dis; 1997 May;8(5):293-8
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  • Results from recent nonrandomized studies suggest that local delivery of heparin or urokinase to the site of angioplasty or stenting results in a lower rate of restenosis.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether local delivery of heparin or urokinase reduces in-stent restenosis.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-three pigs were assigned randomly to one of three groups: controls (n = 9) administered local saline infusion, the heparin group (n = 15) administered local heparin (6000 u/10 min), and the urokinase group (n = 9) administered local urokinase (250000 u/10 min), via a local delivery catheter (Dispatch) at the site of subsequent stent implantation.
  • Prior to local delivery, all of the animals were subjected to balloon injury (balloon:artery diameter ratio approximately or = 1.3) to facilitate intramural drug impregnation.
  • After local therapy, one Palmaz-Schatz stent (mean stent: artery diameter ratio approximately or = 1.25) was implanted within the left anterior descending coronary artery.
  • We found no difference in percentage diameter stenosis (46 +/- 18% control, 42 +/- 27% heparin group, and 37 +/- 20% urokinase group, P = 0.7) and corrected neointimal area (1.06 +/- 0.42 mm2 control, 0.94 +/- 0.29 mm2 heparin, and 0.88 +/- 0.26 mm2 urokinase group, P = 0.7) among groups at follow-up.
  • The activated clotting time rose slightly for heparin-treated animals, suggesting that systemic delivery had occurred, whereas fibrinogen levels did not change in urokinase-treated animals.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Local deliveries of heparin and urokinase via the Dispatch catheter, at the chosen dosages, do not reduce in-stent neointimal hyperplasia in this porcine model.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Disease / prevention & control. Coronary Vessels / pathology. Fibrinolytic Agents / administration & dosage. Heparin / administration & dosage. Plasminogen Activators / administration & dosage. Stents. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Constriction, Pathologic. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Hyperplasia / prevention & control. Infusions, Intravenous. Random Allocation. Recurrence. Swine. Tunica Intima / pathology

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  • (PMID = 9285182.001).
  • [ISSN] 0954-6928
  • [Journal-full-title] Coronary artery disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Coron. Artery Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 9005-49-6 / Heparin; EC 3.4.21.- / Plasminogen Activators; EC 3.4.21.73 / Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
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91. Tagawa M, Kawamura K, Ueyama T, Nakamura M, Tada Y, Ma G, Li Q, Suzuki N, Shimada H, Ochiai T: Cancer therapy with local oncolysis and topical cytokine secretion. Front Biosci; 2008;13:2578-87
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cancer therapy with local oncolysis and topical cytokine secretion.
  • Direct destruction of targeted tumors and subsequent induction of systemic immunity is not pertinent to gene therapy but gene therapy is probably the most suitable therapeutic modality to achieve the local and systemic anti-tumor effects.
  • Current strategies for cancer gene therapy in fact consist of direct inhibition of tumor growth and activation of systemic host defense mechanisms.
  • In this process, dendritic cells play a pivotal role since they act as professional antigen presenting cells and are involved in an initial phase of immune responses, either activation of immunity or induction of immune tolerance.
  • Antigen loading with subsequent appropriate activation of dendritic cells is thereby crucial for activated anti-tumor responses, which possibly eliminate even distant metastatic foci.
  • Combinatory gene therapy with oncolytic viruses and activation of host immune system thereby can evoke immune responses against all the tumor antigens expressed by the process of "antigen-spreading" mechanisms.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviridae / genetics. Cytokines / metabolism. Dendritic Cells / cytology. Gene Transfer Techniques. Genetic Therapy / methods. Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17981735.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-9946
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front. Biosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adenovirus E1A Proteins; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cytokines; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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92. Matsuda M, Omata F, Fuwa S, Saida Y, Suzuki S, Uemura M, Ishii N, Iizuka Y, Fukuda K, Fujita Y: Prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated solely with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: risk factors for one-year recurrence and two-year mortality (preliminary data). Intern Med; 2013;52(8):847-53
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. EPIRUBICIN .

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  • OBJECTIVE: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an essential therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in whom administering other treatments such as liver transplantation, resection or local therapy is not feasible.
  • A subgroup analysis was performed among 24 patients (Group 2) who underwent complete TACE confirmed with abdominal computed tomography (CT) one month later.
  • RESULTS: The patients in Group 1 (men, 59%), all of whom had liver cirrhosis, underwent TACE as the sole therapy for HCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / mortality. Catheterization, Peripheral. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Liver Neoplasms / mortality. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality

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  • (PMID = 23583987.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7235
  • [Journal-full-title] Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin
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93. Michaud LB, Valero V, Hortobagyi G: Risks and benefits of taxanes in breast and ovarian cancer. Drug Saf; 2000 Nov;23(5):401-28
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • They act by binding to tubulin, producing unnaturally stable microtubules and subsequent cell death.
  • The optimal dose of paclitaxel is not known at this time, and controversy over possible dose- or schedule-related differences in efficacy still remain.
  • The combination of paclitaxel and a platinum compound should be utilised as first-line therapy of advanced ovarian cancer.
  • These agents may also be administered intraperitoneally for local therapy of metastatic ovarian cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Taxoids

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  • (PMID = 11085347.001).
  • [ISSN] 0114-5916
  • [Journal-full-title] Drug safety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drug Saf
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] NEW ZEALAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 147
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94. Solignac M: [Assessment of a topical NSAIDs in the treatment of pain and inflammation. The example of Flector Plaster, a local bioadhesive plaster containing diclofenac epolamine]. Presse Med; 2004 Aug 28;33(14 Pt 2):3S10-3
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DICLOFENAC .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Assessment of a topical NSAIDs in the treatment of pain and inflammation. The example of Flector Plaster, a local bioadhesive plaster containing diclofenac epolamine].
  • [Transliterated title] Evaluation d'un anti-inflammatoire non stéroïdien topique dans le traitement de la douleur et de l'inflammation. Exemple de Flector Tissugel 1% dispositif local bioadhésif de diclofénac épolamine.
  • ADVANTAGES AND INCONVENIENCIES OF TRANSDERMAL SYSTEMS: Regarding the advantages, one notes the reduction or even suppression of the gastro-intenstinal disorders related to the oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), the absence of first pass hepatic effect and the better control of the quantities administered of a strong acting drug.
  • FROM AN EXPERIMENTAL POINT OF VIEW: Diclofenac epolamine has demonstrated a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the rat or the rabbit, with transfer following repeated local applications, measurable concentrations in the plasma and adjacent tissues, excellent general tolerance and the safety of the plaster.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / administration & dosage. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Diclofenac / administration & dosage. Diclofenac / analogs & derivatives. Diclofenac / therapeutic use. Inflammation / drug therapy. Pain / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Animals. Ankle Injuries / complications. Ankle Injuries / drug therapy. Athletic Injuries / complications. Athletic Injuries / drug therapy. Humans. Osteoarthritis / complications. Osteoarthritis / drug therapy. Rabbits. Rats. Sprains and Strains

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  • (PMID = 15509042.001).
  • [ISSN] 0755-4982
  • [Journal-full-title] Presse medicale (Paris, France : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Presse Med
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 119623-66-4 / diclofenac hydroxyethylpyrrolidine; 144O8QL0L1 / Diclofenac
  • [Number-of-references] 13
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95. Saling E, Schreiber M, al-Taie T: A simple, efficient and inexpensive program for preventing prematurity. J Perinat Med; 2001;29(3):199-211

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • However, as far as basic means are available for the majority--such as basic health care, monitoring the nutritional state of the mothers and acting to prevent infectious diseases (malaria in particular can cause prematurity)--determined prevention of prematurity should take the form of screening and the treatment of disturbances of the vaginal milieu or genital infections.
  • Regular screening for signs of such a disturbance using vaginal pH-measurements (and if necessary further diagnostics and therapy) makes possible the detection of an "early marker" to prevent prematurity in an effective and inexpensive way.
  • Our prematurity-prevention-program, which has been successful for many years, is based on an anamnestic assessment of prematurity risk, the early detection of warning signs (including regular measurement of the vaginal pH) and, if necessary, the appropriate therapeutic measures.
  • In cases of disturbance of the vaginal milieu, the latter consists of a therapy with lactobacillus preparations or in a combination of lactobacillus preparation with an acidifying therapy which may lead to earlier normalization of the vaginal milieu.
  • In cases of bacterial vaginosis local therapy, for example with metronidazol or clindamycin, is undertaken, and in other infections specific treatment.
  • In a prospective study performed in Erfurt the rate of very early premature births (< 32 + 0 gw) amounted to only 0.3% in contrast to 3.3% in a control group who had not taken part in the self-care activity.
  • According to a differentiated classification of the control group the success of the self-care activity was even clearer: In patients who did not take part because their doctors did not support the self-care activity, the rate of very early premature births amounted to 4.1%.
  • To date measurement of the vaginal pH-value was performed intravaginally using either indicator strips or pH-measuring test gloves.
  • A short time ago we developed a panty liner coated with an indicator strip, which enables reading of the pH-value by just checking the indicator on the panty liner.
  • [MeSH-major] Obstetric Labor, Premature / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Abortion, Spontaneous / etiology. Abortion, Spontaneous / prevention & control. Developing Countries. Female. Gestational Age. Humans. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Infant, Newborn. Infant, Premature. Pregnancy. Reagent Strips. Vagina / microbiology. Vagina / secretion. Vaginosis, Bacterial / complications. Vaginosis, Bacterial / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 11447924.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-5577
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of perinatal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Perinat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Reagent Strips
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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96. Angelescu N, Burcoş T, Jitea N, Bărbulescu M, Cristian D, Vlădăreanu M, Mihai C, Mircea N: [The place of surgery in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer]. Chirurgia (Bucur); 1998 Mar-Apr;93(2):81-6
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  • [Transliterated title] Locul chirurgiei în tratamentul cancerului rectal local avansat.
  • We considered as local advanced rectal cancer (LARC) tumours invading the serosa or adherent to neighbouring organs, tumoral fistulas, histopathologically proved invasion of regional lymph nodes, peritoneal carcinomatosis with or without neoplastic ascites.
  • In 27 patients adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy was associated.
  • Surgery is the essential therapeutic act of LARC.

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  • (PMID = 9656595.001).
  • [ISSN] 1221-9118
  • [Journal-full-title] Chirurgia (Bucharest, Romania : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurgia (Bucur)
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ROMANIA
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97. Bulat C, Stoian M, Pădureanu S, Bîşcă L, Blănaru O: [Intraoperative and early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy--adjuvant treatment for locally advanced digestive system cancer]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2004 Apr-Jun;108(2):403-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

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  • [Transliterated title] Chimioterapia intraperitoneală intra şi postoperatorie--tratament adjuvant pentru cancerele digestive local avansate.
  • Simultaneous intraperitoneal chemotherapy with surgical resection, which is continued over the early postoperative period act on the tumor cells which can be mobilized during the surgical dissection.
  • This adjuvant treatment could lead to better control of local recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Digestive System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Lavage. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15688822.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Romania
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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98. Norris RL Jr: Local anesthetics. Emerg Med Clin North Am; 1992 Nov;10(4):707-18
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Wounds and Injuries.

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  • [Title] Local anesthetics.
  • Emergency physicians often rely on the use of local anesthetic agents to relieve patient discomfort, and research continues in an effort to develop new agents with improved anesthetic qualities.
  • Eventually, a nontoxic, rapidly acting agent may become available that could provide profound anesthesia of long duration when applied topically to intact skin or wounds.
  • Until the "perfect" agent is developed, physicians can help the patient by making knowledgeable choices regarding local anesthetic techniques.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local. Wounds and Injuries / therapy

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  • (PMID = 1425399.001).
  • [ISSN] 0733-8627
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency medicine clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg. Med. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local
  • [Number-of-references] 95
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99. Leunig M, Leunig A, Lankes P, Goetz AE: Evaluation of photodynamic therapy-induced heating of hamster melanoma and its effect on local tumour eradication. Int J Hyperthermia; 1994 Mar-Apr;10(2):297-306

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of photodynamic therapy-induced heating of hamster melanoma and its effect on local tumour eradication.
  • To investigate the contribution of hyperthermia on local tumour eradication by photodynamic therapy (PDT) we quantified PDT induced tumour heating and evaluated its biological effect in vivo.
  • The tumoricidally threshold temperature of 43 degrees C was exceeded at 200 mW cm-2 only, revealing a calculated equivalent treatment time at 43 degrees C of about 10 min.
  • Tumours treated by hyperthermia (water bath) at the maximum temperatures measured during illumination at 200 mW cm-2 (45.5 degrees C for 500 s) or animals receiving laser light at 200 mW cm-2 alone showed a significant growth delay compared to controls (p < 0.05), whereas illumination at 100 mW cm-2 alone or hyperthermia corresponding to the maximum temperature obtained at 100 mW cm-2 (39.5 degrees C for 1000 s) did not alter tumour growth.
  • Although a combination of PDT and hyperthermia might act in an additive or synergistic manner, an unrecognized overlap of both effects might complicate the interpretation of studies on the mechanisms of PDT.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematoporphyrin Photoradiation. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy. Cricetinae. Dihematoporphyrin Ether. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Hot Temperature. Hyperthermia, Induced. Male. Mesocricetus

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  • [ErratumIn] Int J Hyperthermia 1994 Nov-Dec;10(6):867
  • (PMID = 8064187.001).
  • [ISSN] 0265-6736
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of hyperthermia : the official journal of European Society for Hyperthermic Oncology, North American Hyperthermia Group
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Hyperthermia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
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100. Montorsi F, Salonia A, Zanoni M, Pompa P, Cestari A, Guazzoni G, Barbieri L, Rigatti P: Current status of local penile therapy. Int J Impot Res; 2002 Feb;14 Suppl 1:S70-81
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Erectile Dysfunction.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current status of local penile therapy.
  • Topical therapy has the potential to become a first-line treatment for erectile dysfunction because it acts locally and is easy to use.
  • At this time, however, the crossing of the barrier caused by the penile skin and tunica albuginea has limited the efficacy of the drugs used.
  • [MeSH-major] Erectile Dysfunction / drug therapy. Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11850739.001).
  • [ISSN] 0955-9930
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of impotence research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Impot. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasodilator Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 80
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