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1. |||||..... 52%  Golub MS: Adolescent health and the environment. Environ Health Perspect; 2000 Apr;108(4):355-62
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  • [Title] Adolescent health and the environment.
  • Differences in blood volume, respiratory parameters, metabolic needs, and capacity all contribute to altered pharmacokinetics.
  • Increased food intake associated with rapid adolescent growth alters exposure to food contaminants.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent / physiology. Environmental Health. Life Style. Puberty / physiology. Xenobiotics / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 10753095.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-6765
  • [Journal-full-title] Environmental health perspectives
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Environ. Health Perspect.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES04190; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR00169
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Xenobiotics
  • [Number-of-references] 159
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1638015
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2. |||||..... 52%  Park SH: Smoking and adolescent health. Korean J Pediatr; 2011 Oct;54(10):401-4
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  • [Title] Smoking and adolescent health.
  • Adolescents' habitual smoking not only becomes a gateway to all kinds of substance abuse but also causes various health problems including upper respiratory infection, immature lung development, reduced maximum vital capacity, and lung cancer.
  • When these efforts are spread throughout society in cooperation with homes and communities, they will be helpful to protect adolescents' health and improve their quality of life.

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  • (PMID = 22232621.001).
  • [ISSN] 2092-7258
  • [Journal-full-title] Korean journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3250592
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adolescent / Health / Korea / Smoking
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3. ||........ 19%  Audrain-McGovern J, Rodriguez D, Leventhal AM, Cuevas J, Rodgers K, Sass J: Where is the pleasure in that? Low hedonic capacity predicts smoking onset and escalation. Nicotine Tob Res; 2012 Oct;14(10):1187-96
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  • [Title] Where is the pleasure in that? Low hedonic capacity predicts smoking onset and escalation.
  • INTRODUCTION: Hedonic capacity is a dispositional ability to experience pleasure in response to stimuli that are typically rewarding.
  • The ability to derive pleasure from natural reinforcers has been relatively overlooked as a risk factor for adolescent smoking.
  • The present study sought to provide initial evidence for a relationship between hedonic capacity and adolescent smoking onset and escalation.
  • METHODS: The sample was composed of 1,106 adolescents participating in a prospective longitudinal survey study of adolescent health behaviors.
  • We hypothesized that adolescents with lower hedonic capacity may be less responsive to natural reinforcers and therefore be prone to take up and rely on smoking as a reinforcer.
  • RESULTS: A two-part latent growth curve model indicated that adolescents low in hedonic capacity were over two and a half times more likely to have smoked a cigarette in the past month at age 15.5 years (odds ratio = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.08-6.45) and to show a 90% increase (β = 0.9, z = 2.28, p = .02) in the rate of smoking escalation every 6 months across the following 18 months compared with adolescents with high hedonic capacity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first evidence implicating hedonic capacity as a risk factor for adolescent smoking initiation and progression.
  • Adolescents low in hedonic capacity may be an important population to target for smoking prevention and smoking cessation efforts possibly through behavioral skills to enhance pleasure derived through natural reinforcers.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior. Pleasure. Smoking / psychology. Smoking Cessation / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cohort Studies. Demography. Female. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Odds Ratio. Prospective Studies. Reinforcement (Psychology). Reward. Risk Factors. Self Report

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  • (PMID = 22387990.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-994X
  • [Journal-full-title] Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nicotine Tob. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / K08 DA025041; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA126958
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] E78ZFF4KQ0 / Reward
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3457713
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View summary of articles of this page
8. The AHP delivered a popular project to GPs, GP clinics, schools, school counsellors and students, which built the capacity of divisions, GPs, and schools to improve adolescent health care provision.

9. Evaluating a program to build data capacity for core public health functions in local maternal child and adolescent health programs in california.

10. Work group V: increasing the capacity of schools, neighborhoods, and communities to improve adolescent health outcomes.

16. Work group IV: increasing the capacity of parents, families, and adults living with adolescents to improve adolescent health outcomes.

20. Also, improving the availability of trained personnel in these areas of health, culturally sensitive evidence based approaches and capacity building in the primary-care approach is essential to ensure the viability of adolescent health-care in this country.

25. The key objectives of the programme are to make health services more accessible and acceptable to adolescents, establish national standards and criteria for adolescent health care in clinics throughout the country, and build the capacity of health care workers to provide quality services.

28. THE CHIP WORK TEAMS: Of 12 self-managed work teams formed in 1996, 7 are still meeting in some capacity--addressing access to care for the underinsured and uninsured, chronic disease management in underserved areas, community diabetes care, health education and access to care for African immigrants (new Americans), adolescent health, mental health, and violence prevention.

32. (ii) adolescent health (perceived adolescent physical and mental health, presence of an adolescent physical health problem or mental health problem, medication intake); and (iii) parent motivation (perceived adolescent weight category, concern about adolescent weight, importance of adolescent weight, confidence in adolescent capacity to change weight, priority of adolescent weight loss, discrepancy between adolescent current and ideal weight, previous weight loss attempts), was significant (χ2 (16) = 35.19, P = 0.004) accounting for 12.4-16.5% (95% confidence interval) of treatment initiation variance.

33. OBJECTIVES: To identify specific adolescent sub-populations; to evaluate the health data available regarding these populations related to 21 key national adolescent health objectives from Healthy People 2010; and to make recommendations for improving data capacity to further efforts to reduce health disparities among adolescents.

34. According to the findings, at the end of an academic year, the working capacity of most students is low and negligibly low, as verified by such functional criteria as the stability of reactions and the level of functional capacities.

40. For 1,328 adolescents between 11 and 17 years of age, data on cardiorespiratory fitness (Physical working capacity 170, PWC(170)) and familial and adolescent health behavioral factors were collected.


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4. ||........ 17%  Bórquez E G, Raineri B G, Horwitz C N, Huepe O G: [The notion of decision making capacity in medical and legal practice]. Rev Med Chil; 2007 Sep;135(9):1153-9
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  • [Title] [The notion of decision making capacity in medical and legal practice].
  • BACKGROUND: The relationship between patients and health professionals emphasizes deliberation and joint decision making, that derives in the informed consent.
  • AIM: To evaluate decision making of patients in health care and to identify the notion of capacity for decision making, according to lawyers and physicians.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A semi-structured interview about procedures to assess decision making capacity was applied to 27 selected physicians and lawyers, considering their experience in this area.
  • For physicians the notion of capacity is associated to comprehension of the information, it is not absolute, and it must consider the intellectual maturity of the teenager and the autonomy of the elderly.
  • For lawyers, capacity is established by age and is associated to rights and obligations, as determined by law.
  • Capacity has significance in the legal system.
  • Conclusions: Since there are substantial consequences when a person is deemed incompetent, it is necessary to distinguish between health capacity and legal capacity, and to inverted exclamation markink the informed consent with the fundamental rights of citizens, such as taking decisions about our own health.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Child. Chile. Comprehension. Human Rights. Humans. Interviews as Topic. Middle Aged. Qualitative Research. Social Responsibility

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  • (PMID = 18064370.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-9887
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista médica de Chile
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chil
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Chile
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5. ||........ 17%  Lelieveld OT, van Brussel M, Takken T, van Weert E, van Leeuwen MA, Armbrust W: Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Arthritis Rheum; 2007 Aug 15;57(6):898-904
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  • [Title] Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and to assess associations between disease-related variables and aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity.
  • Aerobic capacity was examined using a Symptom Limited Bicycle Ergometry test.
  • Anaerobic capacity was assessed with the Wingate Anaerobic Test.
  • Functional ability was assessed with the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire.
  • CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that adolescents with JIA have an impaired aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity compared with healthy age- and sex-matched peers.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Body Mass Index. Case-Control Studies. Cross-Sectional Studies. Exercise / physiology. Exercise Test. Female. Humans. Male. Oxygen Consumption / physiology. Pain Measurement. Physical Exertion / physiology. Severity of Illness Index


6. ||........ 17%  Sills MR, Hall M, Fieldston ES, Hain PD, Simon HK, Brogan TV, Fagbuyi DB, Mundorff MB, Shah SS: Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States. Emerg Infect Dis; 2011 Sep;17(9):1685-91
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  • [Title] Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States.
  • Quantifying how close hospitals came to exhausting capacity during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 can help the health care system plan for more virulent pandemics.
  • The 5 scenarios projected median occupancy as high as 132% of capacity.
  • The pandemic did not exhaust inpatient bed capacity, but a more virulent pandemic has the potential to push children's hospitals past their maximum inpatient capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Infant. United States / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 21888795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1080-6059
  • [Journal-full-title] Emerging infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerging Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / 5R03HS016418; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / K01 AI73729
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3320222
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7. ||........ 16%  King WC, Engel SG, Elder KA, Chapman WH, Eid GM, Wolfe BM, Belle SH: Walking capacity of bariatric surgery candidates. Surg Obes Relat Dis; 2012 Jan-Feb;8(1):48-59
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  • [Title] Walking capacity of bariatric surgery candidates.
  • BACKGROUND: This study characterizes the walking limitations of bariatric surgery candidates by age and body mass index (BMI) and determines factors independently associated with walking capacity.
  • Their walking capacity was measured by self-report and the 400 m Long Distance Corridor Walk (LDCW).
  • Female gender, Hispanic ethnicity (but not race), greater heart rate at rest, a history of smoking, several co-morbidities (history of stroke, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea, venous edema with ulcerations), and depressive symptoms were also independently related (P < .05) to at least one measure of reduced walking capacity.
  • Although several factors identified in the present study (eg, BMI, age, pain, co-morbidities) should be considered, directly assessing the patient's walking capacity will facilitate appropriate goal setting.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Bariatric Surgery. Body Mass Index. Comorbidity. Female. Heart Rate / physiology. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Smoking / adverse effects. United States

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 21937285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-7533
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgery for obesity and related diseases : official journal of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Obes Relat Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DCC-U10DK066557; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01RR-00037; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072526-01A1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072526-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072526-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072526-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072526-04S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072526-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066471; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066471-01; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066471-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066471-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066471-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066471-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066526-01; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066526-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066526-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066526-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066526-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066555-01; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066555-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066555-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066555-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066555-04S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066555-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066557-01; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066557-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066557-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066557-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066557-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066568-01; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066568-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066568-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066568-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066568-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066585; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066585-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066585-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066585-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK066585-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01- DK66568; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01-DK66471; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01-DK66526; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01-DK66585; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01-DK66667; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR000128; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR000423; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / UL1-DK66555; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1-RR024153; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1-RR024996
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS313418; NLM/ PMC3246050
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8. |||||||||. 130%  Naccarella L, South Australian Tri-division Adolescent Health Project: Evaluation of the rural South Australian Tri-division Adolescent Health Project. Aust J Rural Health; 2003 Jun;11(3):116-20
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  • [Title] Evaluation of the rural South Australian Tri-division Adolescent Health Project.
  • The Adolescent Health Project (AHP) was a rural pilot project aimed at strengthening the relationship between general practitioners (GPs) and adolescents within three Divisions of general practice.
  • The AHP delivered a popular project to GPs, GP clinics, schools, school counsellors and students, which built the capacity of divisions, GPs, and schools to improve adolescent health care provision.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Health Services / organization & administration. Family Practice / organization & administration. Program Evaluation. Rural Health Services / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Humans. Interprofessional Relations. Models, Organizational. Physician-Patient Relations. Pilot Projects. School Health Services / organization & administration. South Australia

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  • (PMID = 12950393.001).
  • [ISSN] 1038-5282
  • [Journal-full-title] The Australian journal of rural health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aust J Rural Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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9. |||||||||. 107%  Oliva G, Rienks J, Chavez GF: Evaluating a program to build data capacity for core public health functions in local maternal child and adolescent health programs in california. Matern Child Health J; 2007 Jan;11(1):1-10
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  • [Title] Evaluating a program to build data capacity for core public health functions in local maternal child and adolescent health programs in california.
  • OBJECTIVES: To improve local Maternal and Child Health programs' capacity to collect and analyze data to support core public health functions, the California Maternal and Child Health Branch (CAMCHB) and the University of California San Francisco Family Health Outcomes project (FHOP) entered into a cooperative agreement.
  • METHODS: Local Health Jurisdiction (LHJ) staff completed a self-administered questionnaire on use of and satisfaction with FHOP's services.
  • [MeSH-major] Community Health Planning / standards. Maternal-Child Health Centers / standards. Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) / methods. Program Evaluation / methods. Public Health Administration / standards. State Health Plans / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. California. Child. Female. Health Care Surveys. Health Planning Technical Assistance / utilization. Humans. Needs Assessment / utilization. Public Health Informatics. Quality Indicators, Health Care. Questionnaires. Staff Development / utilization. United States

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  • (PMID = 17006772.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-7875
  • [Journal-full-title] Maternal and child health journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Matern Child Health J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. |||||||||. 97%  Blum RW, Ellen J: Work group V: increasing the capacity of schools, neighborhoods, and communities to improve adolescent health outcomes. J Adolesc Health; 2002 Dec;31(6 Suppl):288-92
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  • [Title] Work group V: increasing the capacity of schools, neighborhoods, and communities to improve adolescent health outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior. Health Promotion / organization & administration. Residence Characteristics. Schools
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Guidelines as Topic. Health Planning Councils. Humans. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Public Policy. United States

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  • (PMID = 12470926.001).
  • [ISSN] 1054-139X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adolesc Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. ||........ 16%  Takken T, van der Net J, Helders PJ: Anaerobic exercise capacity in patients with juvenile-onset idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Arthritis Rheum; 2005 Apr 15;53(2):173-7
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  • [Title] Anaerobic exercise capacity in patients with juvenile-onset idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.
  • OBJECTIVE: To 1) report the feasibility of an "all-out" 30-second cycling exercise test (Wingate Anaerobic Exercise Test [WAnT]) in juvenile-onset idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (JIIM) patients, 2) describe the anaerobic exercise capacity in juvenile dermatomyositis patients, and 3) determine if the anaerobic exercise capacity could be related to disease duration or disease phase.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Anaerobiosis / physiology. Child. Exercise Test. Feasibility Studies. Female. Health Status. Humans. Male. Questionnaires. Time Factors


12. ||........ 15%  Zamah AM, Mauro MJ, Druker BJ, Oktay K, Egorin MJ, Cedars MI, Rosen MP: Will imatinib compromise reproductive capacity? Oncologist; 2011;16(10):1422-7
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  • [Title] Will imatinib compromise reproductive capacity?
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Animals. Benzamides. Cryopreservation. Female. Humans. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / drug therapy. Oocytes. Ovulation Induction. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 21948652.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-490X
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K12 HD001262-12
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; BKJ8M8G5HI / imatinib
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3228060
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13. |......... 14%  Callicott JH, Mattay VS, Bertolino A, Finn K, Coppola R, Frank JA, Goldberg TE, Weinberger DR: Physiological characteristics of capacity constraints in working memory as revealed by functional MRI. Cereb Cortex; 1999 Jan-Feb;9(1):20-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Physiological characteristics of capacity constraints in working memory as revealed by functional MRI.
  • A fundamental characteristic of working memory is that its capacity to handle information is limited.
  • While there have been many brain mapping studies of working memory, the physiological basis of its capacity limitation has not been explained.
  • We identified characteristics of working memory capacity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy subjects.
  • Working memory capacity was studied using a parametric 'n-back' working memory task involving increasing cognitive load and ultimately decreasing task performance.
  • Loci within dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) evinced exclusively an 'inverted-U' shaped neurophysiological response from lowest to highest load, consistent with a capacity-constrained response.
  • Regions outside of DLPFC, in contrast, were more heterogeneous in response and often showed early plateau or continuously increasing responses, which did not reflect capacity constraints.
  • However, sporadic loci, including in the premotor cortex, thalamus and superior parietal lobule, also demonstrated putative capacity-constrained responses, perhaps arising as an upstream effect of DLPFC limitations or as part of a broader network-wide capacity limitation.
  • These results demonstrate that regionally specific nodes within the working memory network are capacity-constrained in the physiological domain, providing a missing link in current explorations of the capacity characteristics of working memory.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Reference Values


14. |......... 14%  Kanter RK, Moran JR: Pediatric hospital and intensive care unit capacity in regional disasters: expanding capacity by altering standards of care. Pediatrics; 2007 Jan;119(1):94-100
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  • [Title] Pediatric hospital and intensive care unit capacity in regional disasters: expanding capacity by altering standards of care.
  • METHODS: Simulated daily vacancies at each hospital in New York City were generated as the difference between peak capacity and daily occupancy (generated randomly from a normal distribution on the basis of empirical data for each hospital).
  • Capacity for new patients was explored for normal standards of care, for expansion of capacity by a discretionary 20% increase in vacancies by altering admission and discharge criteria, and for more strictly reduced standards of care to double or quadruple admissions for each vacancy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Extending resources by hypothetical alterations of standards of care would usually satisfy targets for hospital surge capacity, but ICU capacity would remain inadequate for large disasters.
  • [MeSH-major] Disaster Planning. Hospitals, Pediatric / supply & distribution. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / supply & distribution. Quality of Health Care / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Critical Illness. Hospital Bed Capacity. Humans. Infant. Models, Statistical. Monte Carlo Method. New York City. Wounds and Injuries / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17200275.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. |......... 14%  Johnson MK, McMahon RP, Robinson BM, Harvey AN, Hahn B, Leonard CJ, Luck SJ, Gold JM: The relationship between working memory capacity and broad measures of cognitive ability in healthy adults and people with schizophrenia. Neuropsychology; 2013 Mar;27(2):220-9
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  • [Title] The relationship between working memory capacity and broad measures of cognitive ability in healthy adults and people with schizophrenia.
  • OBJECTIVE: Working memory (WM) capacity, typically measured with cognitively complex span tasks, is correlated with higher order cognitive abilities in healthy adults.
  • The goals of this study were to determine whether a more focused measure of visual WM storage capacity would show similar higher order ability correlations in healthy adults and in people with schizophrenia (PSZ), thereby demonstrating the importance of simple storage capacity; determine whether the illness alters the pattern of correlations across cognitive domains; and evaluate whether between-groups differences in WM capacity could account for the generalized cognitive impairment in PSZ.
  • The between-groups effect size for WM capacity was large (d = 1.11).
  • When the groups were pooled, WM capacity correlated at r = .68 with MCCB composite score and at r = .56 with WASI estimated Full Scale IQ.
  • WM capacity accounted for approximately 40% of the between-groups variance across the WASI and MCCB.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A simple measure of WM storage capacity is robustly associated with the higher order cognitive abilities assessed by the WASI and MCCB in HCs and PSZ.
  • WM capacity reduction may be a critical determinant of the general cognitive impairment in PSZ.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Intelligence Tests. Male. Middle Aged. Neuropsychological Tests. Psychiatric Status Rating Scales. Schizophrenic Psychology. Statistics as Topic. Time Factors. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 23527650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1931-1559
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropsychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropsychology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR016500; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH065034; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH065034; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH076226
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS490838; NLM/ PMC3746349
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16. ||||||||.. 83%  Steinberg L, Duncan P: Work group IV: increasing the capacity of parents, families, and adults living with adolescents to improve adolescent health outcomes. J Adolesc Health; 2002 Dec;31(6 Suppl):261-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Work group IV: increasing the capacity of parents, families, and adults living with adolescents to improve adolescent health outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior. Family Relations. Health Promotion. Parenting
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Guidelines as Topic. Holistic Health. Humans. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Power (Psychology). United States

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  • (PMID = 12470923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1054-139X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adolesc Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. |||||..... 54%  Olds RS: Informed-consent issues with adolescent health behavior research. Am J Health Behav; 2003 Nov-Dec;27 Suppl 3:S248-63
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Informed-consent issues with adolescent health behavior research.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify the informed-consent issues when conducting adolescent health behavior research.
  • METHODS: A literature review was conducted across diverse academic fields about the informed-consent issues that were relevant to adolescent health behavior research.
  • RESULTS: Issues included defining consent, assent and permission, minimal risk, risk assessment; legal issues; adolescent capacity to participate in research, and parental permission.
  • Obtaining adolescent informed consent must be obtained every time data are collected.
  • There seem to be occasions in which waiver of parental permission in some adolescent health behavior research is warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior / psychology. Behavioral Research / ethics. Health Behavior. Informed Consent / ethics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Ethics Committees, Research. Government Regulation. Humans. Parental Consent / ethics. Risk Assessment. United States

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  • (PMID = 14672386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-3244
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of health behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Health Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 52
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 126025; NRCBL/ VF 18.5.2
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Biomedical and Behavioral Research
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE Bib: behavioral researcch/informed consent; behavioral research/minors
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18. |||||..... 52%  Patton GC, Viner RM, Linh le C, Ameratunga S, Fatusi AO, Ferguson BJ, Patel V: Mapping a global agenda for adolescent health. J Adolesc Health; 2010 Nov;47(5):427-32
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  • [Title] Mapping a global agenda for adolescent health.
  • Major changes in health are underway in many low- and middle-income countries that are likely to bring greater focus on adolescents.
  • This commentary, based on a 2009 London meeting, considers the need for strategic information for future global initiatives in adolescent health.
  • Current coverage of adolescent health in global data collections is patchy.
  • There is both the need and scope to extend existing collections into the adolescent years as well as achieve greater harmonization of measures between surveys.
  • The development of a core set of global adolescent health indicators would aid this process.
  • Other important tasks include adapting and testing interventions in low- and middle-income countries, growing research capacity in those settings, better communication of research from those countries, and building structures to implement future global initiatives.
  • A global agenda needs more than good data, but sound information about adolescent health and its social and environmental determinants, will be important in both advocacy and practice.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior. Health Behavior. Health Promotion. Internationality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Developing Countries. Female. Health Status. Humans. Male. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • [CommentIn] J Adolesc Health. 2010 Nov;47(5):421-2 [20970073.001]
  • (PMID = 20970076.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1972
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adolesc Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / / 091834
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. ||||...... 43%  Thwaite P, Bennett DL, Pynor H, Zigmond H: Art and "the language of well-being" in adolescent health care. Ann Acad Med Singapore; 2003 Jan;32(1):71-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Art and "the language of well-being" in adolescent health care.
  • Feeling effective as a young person depends on a capacity to draw upon one's own resources in the service of healthy living and development.
  • In adolescent health care, there is the need to call upon the talents and creativity of young people, to introduce new and exciting experiences, and to facilitate involvement in their own care in order to nurture optimal growth and development on a physical and psychological level.
  • In seeking to illustrate the value and importance of such approaches, this paper draws upon the experiences of a youth arts program attached to an adolescent ward.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Chronic Disease. Hospitals, Pediatric. Humans. New South Wales

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  • (PMID = 12625101.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-4602
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Acad. Med. Singap.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Singapore
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20. ||||...... 42%  Nair MK, Russell PS: Adolescent health care in India: progressive, regressive or at the cross-roads? Indian J Pediatr; 2012 Jan;79 Suppl 1:S1-5
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  • [Title] Adolescent health care in India: progressive, regressive or at the cross-roads?
  • India has a sizeable adolescent population.
  • Adolescents constitute a vulnerable population for both mental and physical illnesses, and yet their health-care needs and delivery systems are neither well defined nor developed.
  • Many of the mental, reproductive and nutritional health needs of this population are required to be addressed and can be addressed in the primary-care pediatric setting itself if the current system of health-care can be re-organized.
  • This restructuring will be more effective for this population if adolescent friendly approaches, public-private partnership and policy as well as sectoral linkage between the NRHM and other national programs are achieved.
  • The health program for this age group should have promotive and preventive as well as remedial and curative components.
  • Also, improving the availability of trained personnel in these areas of health, culturally sensitive evidence based approaches and capacity building in the primary-care approach is essential to ensure the viability of adolescent health-care in this country.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Health Services / supply & distribution. Delivery of Health Care / methods. Primary Health Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Humans. India


21. ||||...... 39%  Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine: Promoting equity and reducing health disparities among racially/ethnically diverse adolescents: a position paper of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. J Adolesc Health; 2013 Jun;52(6):804-7
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  • [Title] Promoting equity and reducing health disparities among racially/ethnically diverse adolescents: a position paper of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.
  • With this paper, five key domains of advocacy, clinical care and health promotion, education and health services delivery, workforce and professional development, and research are identified.
  • All five require attention in order to reach the overarching goal of health equity for adolescents and young adults.
  • SAHM believes that achieving health equity is related to its organizational mission and vision and is a key factor in driving excellence in adolescent health and medicine.
  • SAHM will continue to expand its capacity, being introspective as an organization as well as make recommendations to others, in an effort to be collaborative and inclusive of professionals, programs, and systems that represent and serve the diverse populations for whom the Society advocates.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Medicine. Ethnic Groups. Health Status Disparities. Societies, Medical
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cultural Competency. Cultural Diversity. Curriculum. Education, Medical, Graduate. Health Policy. Humans. Social Justice. Socioeconomic Factors. United States. World Health Organization

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  • (PMID = 23701890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1972
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adolesc Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. ||||...... 37%  Olsson CA, Byrnes GB, Anney RJ, Collins V, Hemphill SA, Williamson R, Patton GC: COMT Val(158)Met and 5HTTLPR functional loci interact to predict persistence of anxiety across adolescence: results from the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study. Genes Brain Behav; 2007 Oct;6(7):647-52
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  • [Title] COMT Val(158)Met and 5HTTLPR functional loci interact to predict persistence of anxiety across adolescence: results from the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study.
  • We investigated whether a composite genetic factor, based on the combined actions of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) (Val(158)Met) and serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR) (Long-Short) functional loci, has a greater capacity to predict persistence of anxiety across adolescence than either locus in isolation.
  • Analyses were performed on DNA collected from 962 young Australians participating in an eight-wave longitudinal study of mental health and well-being (Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study).
  • By describing the interaction between genetic loci, it may be possible to describe composite genetic factors that have a more substantial impact on psychosocial development than individual loci alone, and in doing so, enhance understanding of the contribution of constitutional processes in mental health outcomes.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Amino Acid Substitution. Child Abuse, Sexual / psychology. Cohort Studies. DNA / genetics. Female. Gene Frequency. Genotype. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Methionine / genetics. Methionine / physiology. Models, Genetic. Psychiatric Status Rating Scales. Questionnaires. Risk Assessment. Socioeconomic Factors. Valine / genetics. Valine / physiology. Victoria / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17504250.001).
  • [ISSN] 1601-1848
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes, brain, and behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Brain Behav.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / SLC6A4 protein, human; 0 / Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins; 9007-49-2 / DNA; AE28F7PNPL / Methionine; EC 2.1.1.6 / Catechol O-Methyltransferase; HG18B9YRS7 / Valine
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23. |||....... 35%  Programming for adolescent health and development. Report of a WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF Study Group on Programming for Adolescent Health. World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser; 1999;886:i-vi, 1-260
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  • [Title] Programming for adolescent health and development. Report of a WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF Study Group on Programming for Adolescent Health.
  • One in every five persons is an adolescent (10-19 years of age).
  • What happens, or does not happen, during the second decade of life has implications that last throughout a lifetime and affect both individual and public health.
  • Their own decisions, behaviours and relationships increasingly determine their health and development.
  • Moreover, adolescence brings with it expanded capacities--for abstract thought and contemplating the future, for empathy and idealism, for critical thought including the questioning of self and others, and for reproduction.
  • Yet the use of these new capacities is dependent on the environment in which adolescents live.
  • The consolidation of knowledge and experience acquired through the WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF Study Group on Programming for Adolescent Health is presented in this report.
  • Verified by research, the report describes the guiding concepts and major interventions that are necessary components for country programming for adolescent health and development.
  • The report asserts the value of addressing the health and development of adolescents simultaneously.
  • It indicates the emerging evidence that actions to meet adolescents' needs for development also discourage them from adopting high-risk behaviours and protect them from the situations that lead to the major health problems.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Health Services / organization & administration. Health Planning. Health Promotion / organization & administration. Human Development. World Health
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Health Plan Implementation. Humans. Male. Needs Assessment. Organizational Objectives. Program Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 10352574.001).
  • [ISSN] 0512-3054
  • [Journal-full-title] World Health Organization technical report series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Technical Report
  • [Publication-country] SWITZERLAND
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24. |||....... 35%  Programming for adolescent health and development. Report of a WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF Study Group on Programming for Adolescent Health. World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser; 1999;(886):i-iv, 1-260
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Programming for adolescent health and development. Report of a WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF Study Group on Programming for Adolescent Health.
  • One in every five persons is an adolescent (10-19 years of age).
  • What happens, or does not happen, during the second decade of life has implications that last throughout a lifetime and affect both individual and public health.
  • Their own decisions, behaviours and relationships increasingly determine their health and development.
  • Moreover, adolescence brings with it expanded capacities--for abstract thought and contemplating the future, for empathy and idealism, for critical thought including the questioning of self and others, and for reproduction.
  • Yet the use of these new capacities is dependent on the environment in which adolescents live.
  • The consolidation of knowledge and experience acquired through the WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF Study Group on Programming for Adolescent Health is presented in this report.
  • Verified by research, the report describes the guiding concepts and major interventions that are necessary components for country programming for adolescent health and development.
  • The report asserts the value of addressing the health and development of adolescents simultaneously.
  • It indicates the emerging evidence that actions to meet adolescents' needs for development also discourage them from adopting high-risk behaviours and protect them from the situations that lead to the major health problems.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Health Services / organization & administration. Health Planning Guidelines. Health Promotion / organization & administration. Needs Assessment / organization & administration. Program Development / methods. United Nations. World Health
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Health Priorities. Health Services Research. Humans. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Politics. Program Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 11400634.001).
  • [ISSN] 0512-3054
  • [Journal-full-title] World Health Organization technical report series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Technical Report
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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25. |||....... 35%  Dickson-Tetteh K, Pettifor A, Moleko W: Working with public sector clinics to provide adolescent-friendly services in South Africa. Reprod Health Matters; 2001 May;9(17):160-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Working with public sector clinics to provide adolescent-friendly services in South Africa.
  • Health care facilities can play an important role for adolescents in preventing health problems, in promoting sexual and reproductive health and in shaping positive behaviours.
  • Extensive research has established that South African public health facilities are failing to provide adolescent-friendly health services.
  • The National Adolescent-Friendly Clinic Initiative (NAFCI) is an accreditation programme designed to improve the quality of adolescent health services at the primary care level and strengthen the public sector's ability to respond to adolescent health needs.
  • The key objectives of the programme are to make health services more accessible and acceptable to adolescents, establish national standards and criteria for adolescent health care in clinics throughout the country, and build the capacity of health care workers to provide quality services.
  • NAFCI is an integral component of the largest, most innovative, public health programme ever launched in South Africa, loveLife.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Health Services / organization & administration. Ambulatory Care Facilities / organization & administration. Counseling / organization & administration. Public Health Administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Health Promotion / organization & administration. Human Rights. Humans. Pilot Projects. Program Development. Quality of Health Care. Reproductive Medicine. Sexuality. South Africa

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  • (PMID = 11468833.001).
  • [ISSN] 0968-8080
  • [Journal-full-title] Reproductive health matters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reprod Health Matters
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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26. |||....... 34%  Lee RL, Hayter M: The effect of a structured adolescent health summer programme: a quasi-experimental intervention. Int Nurs Rev; 2014 Mar;61(1):64-72
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  • [Title] The effect of a structured adolescent health summer programme: a quasi-experimental intervention.
  • BACKGROUND: It is important to integrate adolescent health domains into pre-service nursing education in order to enhance undergraduate nursing students' competencies in promoting adolescent health.
  • AIM: To determine the effectiveness of a structured adolescent health summer programme for Chinese undergraduate nursing students.
  • METHODS: A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate differences in the Chinese undergraduate nursing students' perceived competency in promoting adolescent health.
  • A stand-alone adolescent health course was implemented as an intervention with pre- and post-tests of a 2-week intensive summer programme in 2010.
  • The questionnaire included demographics, adolescent health competency checklist and programme evaluation.
  • RESULTS: Of the 113 nursing students, seniors perceived higher adolescent health competence mean scores than the juniors in the post-test phase.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A stand-alone adolescent health summer programme can prepare nursing students to respond to the health issues of adolescents by enhancing their competence in health need assessment and service delivery.
  • IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: Nurses serve in a leadership role for health policies and programmes.
  • In nursing education, it is important for students to understand how to put in place policies to resolve adolescent health issues.

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  • [Copyright] © 2013 International Council of Nurses.
  • (PMID = 24382169.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-7657
  • [Journal-full-title] International nursing review
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Nurs Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adolescent Care / Capacity Building / Curriculum Planning / Education / Health Service Management / Nursing / Nursing Competence
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27. |||....... 31%  Petersen AC, Leffert N: Developmental issues influencing guidelines for adolescent health research: a review. J Adolesc Health; 1995 Nov;17(5):298-305
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Developmental issues influencing guidelines for adolescent health research: a review.
  • Adolescent development brings many opportunities to adolescents as research participants.
  • Cognitive and reasoning capacity emerges gradually over the adolescent decade, making younger adolescents less capable than older adolescents of effective reasoning.
  • The researcher can adjust materials to be understandable to the younger adolescent but should also recognize that inexperience could increase anxiety or emotionality about an issue not problematic to an older adolescent or adult.
  • Making clear the right of the adolescent to refuse to discuss particular issues usually permits more honest responses, and increases the likelihood of consent to research or parts of research.
  • Especially stressful circumstances may cause degradation of reasoning capacity suggesting that the researcher needs to assess whether the adolescent is able to make a wise decision about participation, as well as about particular responses.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent / physiology. Adolescent Medicine / standards. Adolescent Psychology. Behavioral Research. Human Development. Practice Guidelines as Topic

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  • (PMID = 8924434.001).
  • [ISSN] 1054-139X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adolesc Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 72
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 65037; NRCBL/ special issue
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Biomedical and Behavioral Research
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: behavioral research/informed consent; KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: behavioral research/minors; KIE/ Full author name: Petersen, Anne C; KIE/ Full author name: Leffert, Nancy
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28. |||....... 26%  From the board room to the community room: a health improvement collaboration that's working. Community Health Improvement Partners. Jt Comm J Qual Improv; 1998 Oct;24(10):549-65
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  • [Title] From the board room to the community room: a health improvement collaboration that's working. Community Health Improvement Partners.
  • BACKGROUND: Health systems and clinics in San Diego have joined with public health and academic representatives to develop collaborative, innovative, and effective ways to address the region's ever-increasing health care needs.
  • Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP) was established in a local environment with a highly developed managed care marketplace, a diverse county population, no public hospital, and a growing number of uninsured.
  • The catalyst for the 25-member CHIP coalition was 1994 legislation that required not-for-profit, private hospitals to, among other things, conduct a health needs assessment of its community (every three years) and prepare a community benefit plan and report (annually).
  • THE CHIP WORK TEAMS: Of 12 self-managed work teams formed in 1996, 7 are still meeting in some capacity--addressing access to care for the underinsured and uninsured, chronic disease management in underserved areas, community diabetes care, health education and access to care for African immigrants (new Americans), adolescent health, mental health, and violence prevention.
  • BENEFITS OF A COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT COALITION: The participation of the full spectrum and variety of health care stakeholders at the table, unique to San Diego, has enabled CHIP to serve as an open forum for frank discussions of critical and, at times, controversial health care issues.
  • CHIP hopes to live up to its aspirations to make a difference through accomplishments that are cost-effective to truly improve the health of San Diego residents.
  • [MeSH-major] Community Health Planning / organization & administration. Community-Institutional Relations. Cooperative Behavior. Health Care Coalitions / organization & administration. Hospitals, Voluntary / organization & administration. Total Quality Management / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] California. Health Priorities. Humans. Managed Care Programs. Marketing of Health Services. Needs Assessment. Organizational Case Studies. Program Development. Program Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 9801953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1070-3241
  • [Journal-full-title] The Joint Commission journal on quality improvement
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jt Comm J Qual Improv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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29. |||....... 26%  Shubochkina EI, Samotolkina NG, Molchanova SS: [Adolescent health care in vocational training and work]. Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk; 1993;(6):19-23
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  • [Title] [Adolescent health care in vocational training and work].
  • Approaches to promoting adolescents' health are examined.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Status. Industry. Occupational Exposure. Occupational Health
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Humans. Work Capacity Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 7690278.001).
  • [ISSN] 0869-6047
  • [Journal-full-title] Vestnik Rossiĭskoĭ akademii meditsinskikh nauk / Rossiĭskaia akademiia meditsinskikh nauk
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vestn. Akad. Med. Nauk SSSR
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] RUSSIA
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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30. |||....... 25%  Green M: Adolescent health care. Child Today; 1979 Sep-Oct;8(5):8-11
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  • [Title] Adolescent health care.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Medicine. Hospitals, Pediatric. Hospitals, Special. Medical History Taking
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299. Humans. Indiana. Self-Assessment

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  • (PMID = 544199.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-4336
  • [Journal-full-title] Children today
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Today
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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31. ||........ 24%  Griffith R, Tengnah C: Mental capacity Act 2005: assessing decision-making capacity. Br J Community Nurs; 2008 Jun;13(6):284-8
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  • [Title] Mental capacity Act 2005: assessing decision-making capacity.
  • In last month's article on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 Richard Griffith and Cassam Tengnah outlined the statutory principles and key powers that underpin the Act.
  • This month's article considers one of the fundamental requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, how and when should district nurses assess decision making capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Community Health Nursing. Decision Trees. Great Britain. Humans

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  • (PMID = 18773769.001).
  • [ISSN] 1462-4753
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of community nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Community Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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32. ||........ 23%  Dhingra A, Brennan L, Walkley J: Predicting treatment initiation in a family-based adolescent overweight and obesity intervention. Obesity (Silver Spring); 2011 Jun;19(6):1307-10
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  • [Title] Predicting treatment initiation in a family-based adolescent overweight and obesity intervention.
  • This study investigated parent-reported adolescent demographic, adolescent health, and parent motivation factors associated with initiation of a family-based adolescent overweight and obesity intervention.
  • A telephone survey was completed by 349 parents calling to register their interest in participating in a cognitive behavioral lifestyle intervention for adolescent overweight and obesity.
  • A binomial logistic regression, with predictors entered in three blocks: (i) adolescent demographic (adolescent age, gender, adolescent BMI-for-age z-score, parent BMI);.
  • (ii) adolescent health (perceived adolescent physical and mental health, presence of an adolescent physical health problem or mental health problem, medication intake); and (iii) parent motivation (perceived adolescent weight category, concern about adolescent weight, importance of adolescent weight, confidence in adolescent capacity to change weight, priority of adolescent weight loss, discrepancy between adolescent current and ideal weight, previous weight loss attempts), was significant (χ2 (16) = 35.19, P = 0.004) accounting for 12.4-16.5% (95% confidence interval) of treatment initiation variance.
  • Parent-reported adolescent physical health problem, parent perception of adolescent weight category, parent priority of adolescent weight loss, and parent perception of discrepancy between adolescent current and ideal weight were significant in the model.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavior Therapy. Family. Obesity / psychology. Obesity / therapy. Overweight / psychology. Overweight / therapy. Patient Acceptance of Health Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adolescent Behavior. Body Mass Index. Child. Child Behavior. Diet, Reducing. Female. Health Promotion / methods. Health Status. Humans. Life Style. Male. Motivation. Motor Activity. Parents / psychology

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  • (PMID = 21151019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1930-739X
  • [Journal-full-title] Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obesity (Silver Spring)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. ||........ 23%  Knopf DK, Jane Park M, Brindis CD, Mulye TP, Irwin CE Jr: What gets measured gets done: assessing data availability for adolescent populations. Matern Child Health J; 2007 Jul;11(4):335-45
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] What gets measured gets done: assessing data availability for adolescent populations.
  • OBJECTIVES: To identify specific adolescent sub-populations; to evaluate the health data available regarding these populations related to 21 key national adolescent health objectives from Healthy People 2010; and to make recommendations for improving data capacity to further efforts to reduce health disparities among adolescents.
  • METHODS: Adolescent populations were identified through a consensus process.
  • Academic and government literature was extensively reviewed using internet search techniques to identify available national data for each of these populations on each key national health objective.
  • RESULTS: 18 adolescent subpopulations were identified.
  • These populations fit into four overlapping categories defined by demography, legal status, chronic health condition, or other special characteristics.
  • Overall, national, population-based data regarding these sub-populations were located for 36% of the 21 health objectives.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There are still too little data available regarding the specific health status or health objectives for different adolescent populations.
  • A national adolescent data-priority agenda is needed to develop strategies to improve health data regarding adolescent sub-populations.
  • Federal and state health monitoring agencies could create national health profiles of different populations, include more population markers in health studies, and develop tools for population-specific health assessment, particularly for those within the government's care, including incarcerated and foster care youth.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Status. Healthy People Programs. Information Management
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Data Collection / methods. Health Planning. Humans. Minority Groups

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  • (PMID = 17308967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-7875
  • [Journal-full-title] Maternal and child health journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Matern Child Health J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / U45MC 00002; United States / PHS HHS / / U45MC 00023
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. ||........ 21%  Iakovlev BP, Litovchenko OG: [Psychophysiological characteristics of the working capacity of students]. Gig Sanit; 2008 Jan-Feb;(1):60-3
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  • [Title] [Psychophysiological characteristics of the working capacity of students].
  • The functional state of the central nervous system (CNS) and the working capacity were objectively evaluated in the first-fourth-year students of a northern higher educational establishment, by statistically analyzing the latent period of a simple visual motor reaction.
  • According to the findings, at the end of an academic year, the working capacity of most students is low and negligibly low, as verified by such functional criteria as the stability of reactions and the level of functional capacities.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Health Status. Humans

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  • (PMID = 18365458.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-9900
  • [Journal-full-title] Gigiena i sanitariia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gig Sanit
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
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35. ||........ 21%  Shlafer R, Hergenroeder AC, Jean Emans S, Rickert VI, Adger H Jr, Spear B, Irwin CE Jr, Kreipe RE, Walker LR, Resnick MD: Adolescence as a critical stage in the MCH Life Course Model: commentary for the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) interdisciplinary training program projects. Matern Child Health J; 2014 Feb;18(2):462-6
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  • [Title] Adolescence as a critical stage in the MCH Life Course Model: commentary for the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) interdisciplinary training program projects.
  • The Life Course Perspective (LCP), or Model, is now a guiding framework in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) activities, including training, supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau.
  • Adolescence is a distinct developmental period with unique opportunities for the development of health, competence and capacity and not merely a transitional phase between childhood and adulthood.
  • Adequately addressing adolescents' emergent and ongoing health needs requires well-trained and specialized professionals who recognize the unique role of this developmental period in the LCP.

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  • (PMID = 23435919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-6628
  • [Journal-full-title] Maternal and child health journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Matern Child Health J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. ||........ 20%  Adiputra N, Alex P, Sutjana DP, Tirtayasa K, Manuaba A: Balinese dance exercises improve the maximum aerobic capacity. J Hum Ergol (Tokyo); 1996 Jun;25(1):25-9
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  • [Title] Balinese dance exercises improve the maximum aerobic capacity.
  • The maximum aerobic capacity can be used to predict the maximum working capacity.
  • The maximum working capacity plays an important role in achieving the best performance.
  • Therefore, physical fitness program for maintaining maximum working capacity is a must.
  • The maximum aerobic capacity was measured, based on the Modified Harvard Step-up Test and nomogram of Astrand.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Blood Pressure. Body Composition. Exercise Test. Heart Rate. Humans. Indonesia. Male. Occupational Health. Work Capacity Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 9551128.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8134
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of human ergology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Hum Ergol (Tokyo)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
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37. ||........ 20%  Engelbert RH, Plantinga M, Van der Net J, Van Genderen FR, Van den Berg MH, Helders PJ, Takken T: Aerobic capacity in children with hemophilia. J Pediatr; 2008 Jun;152(6):833-8, 838.e1
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  • [Title] Aerobic capacity in children with hemophilia.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aerobic capacity is normal in boys with different types of hemophilia compared with healthy peers and whether the level of aerobic capacity correlates with the amount of physical activity, joint health status, muscle strength, and anthropometrics.
  • Anthropometry, muscle strength, joint impairment, functional ability, and aerobic capacity were measured.
  • Relative peak oxygen, peak heart rate, and peak working capacity were significantly lower compared with healthy control subjects.
  • CONCLUSION: The aerobic capacity of children with hemophilia is still lower than the normal population, whereas their overall muscle strength is comparable with healthy peers.
  • The functional ability does not differ from healthy peers, and joint health status showed very minor impairments.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 18492527.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6833
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. ||........ 19%  Bond L, Glover S, Godfrey C, Butler H, Patton GC: Building capacity for system-level change in schools: lessons from the Gatehouse Project. Health Educ Behav; 2001 Jun;28(3):368-83
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  • [Title] Building capacity for system-level change in schools: lessons from the Gatehouse Project.
  • The Gatehouse Project is an innovative, comprehensive approach to mental health promotion in secondary schools.
  • The key elements of the whole-school intervention are the establishment and support of a school-based adolescent health team; the identification of risk and protective factors in each school's social and leaning environment from student surveys; and, through the use of these data, the identification and implementation of effective strategies to address these issues.
  • This article describes and accounts for how system-level changes have been made in schools through a process of capacity building.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Promotion / organization & administration. Mental Health Services / organization & administration. Organizational Innovation. School Health Services / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Communication. Humans. Intervention Studies. Organizational Culture. Problem Solving. Process Assessment (Health Care). Social Support. Victoria. Violence / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 11380056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-1981
  • [Journal-full-title] Health education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Educ Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. ||........ 18%  Parker TL, Wang XH, Pazmiño J, Engeseth NJ: Antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of grapes, sun-dried raisins, and golden raisins and their effect on ex vivo serum antioxidant capacity. J Agric Food Chem; 2007 Oct 17;55(21):8472-7
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  • [Title] Antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of grapes, sun-dried raisins, and golden raisins and their effect on ex vivo serum antioxidant capacity.
  • Grapes and raisins provide phenolic antioxidants, which contribute to their potential health benefits.
  • The objectives of this study were to compare the antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of green Thompson seedless grapes (the most common variety of grapes consumed in the United States), sun-dried raisins, and golden raisins (both produced from Thompson seedless grapes) and to observe the effects of their consumption over 4 weeks in 15 healthy human males with a cross-over design.
  • The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) (positive statistical significance for grapes after 2 weeks and golden raisins after 3 weeks), serum oxidation (positive statistical significance for golden raisin lag time after 4 weeks), total phenolics (no significant effects), and C-reactive protein (no significant effects) were monitored.
  • Golden raisins had the highest antioxidant capacity and phenolic content.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. C-Reactive Protein / analysis. Desiccation. Diet. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Reactive Oxygen Species / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 17880162.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-8561
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Agric. Food Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Phenols; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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40. ||........ 18%  Peterhans E, Worth A, Woll A: Association between health behaviors and cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents: results from the cross-sectional MoMo-study. J Adolesc Health; 2013 Aug;53(2):272-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association between health behaviors and cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents: results from the cross-sectional MoMo-study.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between adolescent and familial health behavioral factors and cardiorespiratory fitness in German adolescent boys and girls.
  • For 1,328 adolescents between 11 and 17 years of age, data on cardiorespiratory fitness (Physical working capacity 170, PWC(170)) and familial and adolescent health behavioral factors were collected.
  • Health behavior was assessed using psychometric questionnaires (socioeconomic status, pubertal stage, daily physical activity, sports-club time, parental physical activity habits, etc.).
  • A hierarchical multiple regression model was used to quantify the association between relative PWC(170) values and health behavior.
  • RESULTS: The relationship between adolescents' health behavioral factors and cardiorespiratory fitness was stronger than the relationship between age, social status, familial health behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness.
  • Familial health behavioral factors explained 4.1% and 2.1% of variance in cardiorespiratory fitness in girls and boys, respectively.
  • Adolescents' health behavioral factors explained 15.2% of variance in girls and 25.7% of variance in boys.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The difference in explained variance in cardiorespiratory fitness by familial and adolescents' health behavioral factors between girls and boys indicates that different predictors for cardiorespiratory fitness are important for girls and boys.
  • Hence, sex specific research and interventions aimed at improving familial and adolescent health behavior may be important.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior. Health Behavior. Physical Fitness
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anthropometry. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Germany. Humans. Male. Psychometrics. Questionnaires. Risk Factors. Socioeconomic Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23683498.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1972
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adolesc Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adolescents / Fitness / Lifestyle / Physical activity / “Motorik-Modul” (MoMo)
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41. ||........ 18%  Chavis DM: Building community capacity to prevent violence through coalitions and partnerships. J Health Care Poor Underserved; 1995;6(2):234-45
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  • [Title] Building community capacity to prevent violence through coalitions and partnerships.
  • This paper will explore the most effective strategic roles that coalitions can play in the prevention of complex, entrenched social and health problems such as violence, alcoholism, and other substance abuse problems.
  • There is a growing body of "wisdom" and research literature that suggests that the most effective role for community coalitions and partnerships in terms of prevention is to build the capacity of community leaders and their institutions to better serve their constituencies.
  • This paper also outlines the key internal capacities a coalition will need in order to establish this system.
  • [MeSH-major] Consumer Organizations. Health Promotion. Violence / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Humans. Interinstitutional Relations. Juvenile Delinquency / prevention & control. Public Policy. Social Support. Substance-Related Disorders / prevention & control. United States

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  • (PMID = 7795037.001).
  • [ISSN] 1049-2089
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of health care for the poor and underserved
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Health Care Poor Underserved
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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42. ||........ 17%  Tan JO, Fegert JM: Capacity and competence in child and adolescent psychiatry. Health Care Anal; 2004 Dec;12(4):285-94; discussion 265-72
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Capacity and competence in child and adolescent psychiatry.
  • Capacity and competence in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry are complex issues, because of the many different influences that are involved in how children and adolescents make treatment decisions within the setting of mental health.
  • This article will examine some of the influences which must be considered, namely: developmental aspects, the paradoxical relationship between the need for autonomy and participation and the capacity of children, family psychiatry, and the duty of care towards children and adolescents.
  • A case vignette will be used as a focus to consider the complexity of the issue of competence in child and adolescent psychiatry, in the particular mental disorder of anorexia nervosa.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anorexia Nervosa / epidemiology. Anorexia Nervosa / psychology. Child. Child Care / ethics. Eating Disorders / psychology. Female. Humans. Male. Morals. Patient Participation / psychology

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  • (PMID = 15658083.001).
  • [ISSN] 1065-3058
  • [Journal-full-title] Health care analysis : HCA : journal of health philosophy and policy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Care Anal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 51
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 119399
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Mental Health Therapies / Professional Patient Relationship
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE Bib: informed consent/minors; informed consent/mentally disabled
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43. ||........ 17%  Brewin CR, Beaton A: Thought suppression, intelligence, and working memory capacity. Behav Res Ther; 2002 Aug;40(8):923-30
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Thought suppression, intelligence, and working memory capacity.
  • The importance of individual differences in intelligence and working memory capacity in predicting the ability to intentionally suppress thoughts was investigated.
  • Sixty participants completed a thought suppression task, and measures of working memory capacity (OSPAN), fluid intelligence (Raven's Matrices), and crystallised intelligence (the National Adult Reading Test).
  • As predicted, the results indicated that more effective thought suppression was independently related to higher working memory capacity and greater fluid intelligence, but was unrelated to crystallised intelligence.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 12186355.001).
  • [ISSN] 0005-7967
  • [Journal-full-title] Behaviour research and therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Behav Res Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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44. ||........ 17%  Müller D, Bossdorf U: [Cooperation between adolescent health protection and occupational health in dispensary health care]. Arztl Jugendkd; 1987;78(2):97-102
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  • [Title] [Cooperation between adolescent health protection and occupational health in dispensary health care].
  • [MeSH-major] Disabled Persons. Occupational Diseases / prevention & control. Patient Care Team. Work Capacity Evaluation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Berlin. Humans

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  • (PMID = 2959122.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-9518
  • [Journal-full-title] Ärztliche Jugendkunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arztl Jugendkd
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY, EAST
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45. ||........ 17%  Feenan D: Capacity to decide about medical treatment. Br J Hosp Med; 1996 Sep 18-Oct 1;56(6):295-7
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  • [Title] Capacity to decide about medical treatment.
  • The British Medical Association and Law Society recently produced much-needed guidance for doctors on assessment of mental capacity to consent to or refuse medical treatment.
  • This article assesses various aspects of the guidance and examines key issues with reference to growing literature on capacity.
  • The author recommends use of the guidance to health-care professionals generally and identifies further areas for consideration.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Great Britain. Humans. Societies, Medical

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  • (PMID = 8889105.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1064
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of hospital medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Hosp Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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46. ||........ 17%  Giannini MJ, Protas EJ: Aerobic capacity in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy children. Arthritis Care Res; 1991 Sep;4(3):131-5
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  • [Title] Aerobic capacity in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy children.
  • This study compared aerobic capacity and highest work load completed by children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and healthy children during bicycle ergometer exercise.
  • A secondary purpose was to determine the relationship between measures of disease severity and (a) aerobic capacity and (b) highest work load completed among the JRA patients.
  • Aerobic capacity was measured using an open-circuit computerized gas analysis system.
  • The healthy children achieved a significantly higher aerobic capacity than their respective control (p < 0.001, paired t test, two-tailed).
  • There was no relationship between measures of articular disease severity and (a) aerobic capacity and (b) highest work load completed among the JRA patients.
  • Additionally, an individual's functional exercise capacity is not directly related to the severity of the articular disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Exercise Test. Humans

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  • (PMID = 11188598.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-7524
  • [Journal-full-title] Arthritis care and research : the official journal of the Arthritis Health Professions Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arthritis Care Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR-00350
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. ||........ 17%  Sherman MS, Kaplan JM, Effgen S, Campbell D, Dold F: Pulmonary dysfunction and reduced exercise capacity in patients with myelomeningocele. J Pediatr; 1997 Sep;131(3):413-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pulmonary dysfunction and reduced exercise capacity in patients with myelomeningocele.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pulmonary function and exercise capacity in children with myelomeningocele.
  • RESULTS: Mean total lung capacity and fractional lung volumes were significantly lower in case subjects than control subjects.
  • Eleven subjects (92%) had a reduced forced vital capacity; seven (58%) had restrictive disease as evidenced by reductions in total lung capacity with normal or increased forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio.
  • Exercise capacity was reduced as evidenced by a lower maximum oxygen consumption at peak exercise (13.8 +/- 4.8 vs 21.3 +/- 7.5 ml/min per kilogram of body weight; p < 0.02) and a lower anaerobic threshold (12.4 +/- 5.1 vs 17.3 +/- 4.2 ml/min per kilogram; p < 0.01) than the control group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Though most subjects with myelomeningocele had a significant degree of restrictive lung disease, respiratory muscle weakness, or both, exercise capacity was mostly limited by arm weakness.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anaerobic Threshold. Body Weight. Case-Control Studies. Child. Exercise Test. Female. Forced Expiratory Volume. Humans. Male. Oxygen Consumption. Prospective Studies. Vital Capacity

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  • (PMID = 9329418.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3476
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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48. ||........ 17%  Murphy GH, O'Callaghan A: Capacity of adults with intellectual disabilities to consent to sexual relationships. Psychol Med; 2004 Oct;34(7):1347-57
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Capacity of adults with intellectual disabilities to consent to sexual relationships.
  • Hypothetically, services should be guided by whether a particular person with intellectual disabilities has the capacity to consent to sexual relationships.
  • However, there has been little agreement on how to define such capacity.
  • This study examines the issue of capacity to consent to sexual relationships using a functional approach.
  • Implications of the findings for definitions of capacity to consent to sexual relationships are considered.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Assertiveness. Female. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Humans. Intelligence. Male. Sex Offenses / legislation & jurisprudence. Sex Offenses / prevention & control. Sex Offenses / psychology

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  • (PMID = 15697061.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2917
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychological medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychol Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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49. ||........ 17%  Rhyne SB, Schiro S: Injury prevention: North Carolina's challenge and capacity to respond. N C Med J; 2010 Nov-Dec;71(6):531-3
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  • [Title] Injury prevention: North Carolina's challenge and capacity to respond.
  • Findings of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine (NCIOM) Task Force on Adolescent Health and the NCIOM Task Force on Prevention, combined with the North Carolina Division of Public Health strategic plan and the Injury and Violence Prevention State Advisory Council, have laid the path toward this goal.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Care Coalitions / organization & administration. Health Planning / organization & administration. Violence / prevention & control. Wounds and Injuries / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 21500661.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-2559
  • [Journal-full-title] North Carolina medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] N C Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. ||........ 17%  Zverev Y, Gondwe M: Ventilatory capacity indices in Malawian children. East Afr Med J; 2001 Jan;78(1):14-8
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  • [Title] Ventilatory capacity indices in Malawian children.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare ventilatory capacity indices in healthy Malawian school children with those of other ethnic Africans and Caucasians.
  • DESIGN: Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), FEV1 expressed as a percentage of FVC (FEV%), weight and height.
  • RESULTS: Ventilatory capacity indices (FEV1, FVC and PEFR) strongly and significantly correlated to body size and age of children of both sexes.
  • The Malawian children have similar ventilatory capacity indices to those of Nigerian, Jamaican and Tanzanian children.
  • CONCLUSION: Prediction equations calculated in this study should be used for interpretation of ventilatory capacity indices in Malawian children instead of reference values for Caucasians or ethnic scaling factors.
  • Computation of regional reference values for ventilatory capacity indices shall be continued.
  • [MeSH-major] Child Development / physiology. Vital Capacity / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Factors. Anthropometry. Child. Developing Countries. Female. Forced Expiratory Flow Rates. Health Surveys. Humans. Malawi. Male. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate. Reference Values. Respiratory Function Tests. Rural Population. Sex Factors

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  • (PMID = 11320757.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-835X
  • [Journal-full-title] East African medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] East Afr Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Kenya
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51. ||........ 17%  Brewin CR, Smart L: Working memory capacity and suppression of intrusive thoughts. J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry; 2005 Mar;36(1):61-8
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  • [Title] Working memory capacity and suppression of intrusive thoughts.
  • We sought to show that individual differences in working memory capacity are related to the ability to intentionally suppress personally relevant intrusive thoughts, and that this effect cannot be explained by differences in negative mood.
  • Better performance on a measure of working memory capacity (OSPAN) was related to having fewer intrusions in the suppression condition but was unrelated to number of intrusions in the expression condition, suggesting a specific association with attempts to inhibit unwanted thoughts.
  • Working memory capacity was not associated with negative mood or with the frequency of intrusive thoughts reported in everyday life.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Affect. Attention. Female. Humans. Individuality. Male. Middle Aged. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder / psychology. Personality Inventory. Sex Factors. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / psychology. Thinking

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  • (PMID = 15687010.001).
  • [ISSN] 0005-7916
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. ||........ 16%  Roberts-Gray C, Gingiss PM, Boerm M: Evaluating school capacity to implement new programs. Eval Program Plann; 2007 Aug;30(3):247-57
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluating school capacity to implement new programs.
  • An eight-factor survey-based Bayesian model (Bridge-It) for assessing school capacity to implement health and education programs was tested in secondary analyses of data from 47 schools in the Texas Tobacco Prevention Initiative (TTPI).
  • The Bridge-It score aggregated across all eight of the capacity factors predicted both quality of adherence to the Guidelines for School Programs to Prevent Tobacco Use and Addiction and quantity of implementing activity.
  • Integration of Bridge-It, or comparable multi-attribute tools, into the planning and evaluation of school-centered programs can increase understanding of factors that influence implementation and provide guidance for capacity building.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Education / methods. Program Development / methods. Program Evaluation / methods. School Health Services / organization & administration. Smoking / prevention & control. Smoking Cessation / methods. Students / psychology. Tobacco Use Disorder / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adolescent Behavior / psychology. Bayes Theorem. Humans. Models, Organizational. Organizational Culture. Questionnaires. Socioeconomic Factors. Texas


53. ||........ 16%  Chenneville T, Sibille K, Lujan-Zilbermann J, Rodriguez C, Brown M, Emmanuel P: Medical decisional capacity among children with HIV. AIDS Care; 2010 Nov;22(11):1359-66
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  • [Title] Medical decisional capacity among children with HIV.
  • Medical decisional capacity (DC) refers to the ability to understand, appreciate, and make meaningful decisions about one's health.
  • Findings suggest that children living with HIV have the capacity to meaningfully participate in their healthcare despite lower intellectual and adaptive functioning.
  • [MeSH-major] Decision Making. HIV Infections / psychology. Mental Competency / psychology. Patient Acceptance of Health Care / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Family. Female. Humans. Male. Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 20686987.001).
  • [ISSN] 1360-0451
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / T32 NS045551
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
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54. ||........ 16%  Sabino Neto M, Demattê MF, Freire M, Garcia EB, Quaresma M, Ferreira LM: Self-esteem and functional capacity outcomes following reduction mammaplasty. Aesthet Surg J; 2008 Jul-Aug;28(4):417-20
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  • [Title] Self-esteem and functional capacity outcomes following reduction mammaplasty.
  • BACKGROUND: Both physical health and psychosocial outcomes are important issues in the evaluation of medical treatment.
  • Women with breast hypertrophy may suffer from low self-esteem and reduced functional capacity because of the size of their breasts.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of reduction mammaplasty on self-esteem and functional capacity in patients with breast hypertrophy.
  • At the beginning of the study, all patients were interviewed to collect clinical and demographic data and to have their self-esteem and functional capacity measured.
  • Two Brazilian-validated versions of quality of life measurement instruments were chosen: the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Rolland-Morris (to assess functional capacity).
  • Functional capacity had improved 6 months after reduction mammaplasty (group A) as compared to the control group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Reduction mammaplasty improved self-esteem and functional capacity and relieved pain in the lower back region in patients with breast hypertrophy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Hypertrophy / surgery. Low Back Pain / etiology. Low Back Pain / physiopathology. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement. Patient Satisfaction. Prospective Studies. Questionnaires. Recovery of Function / physiology. Research Design. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


55. ||........ 16%  Karlqvist L, Leijon O, Härenstam A: Physical demands in working life and individual physical capacity. Eur J Appl Physiol; 2003 Aug;89(6):536-47
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  • [Title] Physical demands in working life and individual physical capacity.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the excess of metabolic level (metabolic demands in work exceeding one-third of the individual's aerobic capacity) of working men and women today and to describe the population whose metabolic level is exceeded.
  • A second aim was to explore how externally assessed metabolic demands match with the physical function and capacity of working men and women in jobs with the lowest and the highest demands.
  • This is reflected in a mismatch between individual physical capacity and the physical demands of work for 25% of the population.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Employment / statistics & numerical data. Exercise. Female. Health Status. Human Engineering. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution

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  • (PMID = 12728324.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-6319
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of applied physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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56. ||........ 16%  Horvath SM, Agnew JW, Wagner JA, Bedi JF: Maximal aerobic capacity at several ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide at several altitudes. Res Rep Health Eff Inst; 1988 Dec;(21):1-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Maximal aerobic capacity at several ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide at several altitudes.
  • In order to assess the combined effects of altitude and acute carbon monoxide exposure, 11 male and 12 female subjects, nonsmokers in good health, were given incremental (two minutes at each workload) maximal aerobic capacity tests at four levels of ambient carbon monoxide (0, 50, 100, and 150 parts per million) at four altitudes (55, 1,524, 2,134, and 3,048 m).
  • Subjects initially were screened with a medical history questionnaire, a 12-lead electrocardiogram, pulmonary function tests, anthropometric and body fat measurements, blood volume determinations, and a maximal aerobic capacity test.
  • Each subject, after attaining the required altitude and ambient carbon monoxide level, performed the maximal aerobic capacity test (maximum VO2) meeting required conditions to assure that a maximal level was attained.
  • Blood samples were drawn prior to the aerobic capacity test; at workloads of 50 watts, 100 watts, 150 watts, and maximum; at the fifth minute of recovery; and prior to repressurization to sea level.
  • Despite increases in carboxyhemoglobin, no additional significant decreases in maximal aerobic capacity were observed.
  • We demonstrated that altitude hypoxia and carbon monoxide hypoxia act independently on the parameters of the maximal aerobic capacity test.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Lung Volume Measurements. Male

  • HSDB. structure - CARBON MONOXIDE.
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  • (PMID = 3269259.001).
  • [ISSN] 1041-5505
  • [Journal-full-title] Research report (Health Effects Institute)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Res Rep Health Eff Inst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7U1EE4V452 / Carbon Monoxide
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57. ||........ 16%  Oetzel J, Wallerstein N, Solimon A, Garcia B, Siemon M, Adeky S, Apachito G, Caston E, Finster C, Belone L, Tafoya G: Creating an instrument to measure people's perception of community capacity in American Indian communities. Health Educ Behav; 2011 Jun;38(3):301-10
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  • [Title] Creating an instrument to measure people's perception of community capacity in American Indian communities.
  • The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of community capacity for American Indian communities.
  • Confirmatory factor analysis primarily supported the factorial structure of the instruments, and the seven dimensions were found to correlate with previously validated measures of social capital, historical trauma, community influence, and physical health in expected directions.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Factor Analysis, Statistical. Female. Humans. Interviews as Topic. Male. Middle Aged. Reproducibility of Results. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21467256.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-6127
  • [Journal-full-title] Health education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Educ Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / (U48/CCU610818-05/SIP24; United States / PHS HHS / / U269400006-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. ||........ 16%  Fredriksen PM, Veldtman G, Hechter S, Therrien J, Chen A, Warsi MA, Freeman M, Liu P, Siu S, Thaulow E, Webb G: Aerobic capacity in adults with various congenital heart diseases. Am J Cardiol; 2001 Feb 1;87(3):310-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Aerobic capacity in adults with various congenital heart diseases.
  • Forced vital capacity values (3.51 L, mean SD +/- 1.02) were lower than predicted values (4.10 L, mean SD +/- 0.90, p <0.0001) for all patients groups except those with ASD.
  • This study showed diminished aerobic capacity in all diagnostic groups when compared with a healthy population.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate


59. ||........ 16%  Guarany NR, Schwartz IV, Guarany FC, Giugliani R: Functional capacity evaluation of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis. J Pediatr Rehabil Med; 2012;5(1):37-46
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  • [Title] Functional capacity evaluation of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate functional capacity and joint range of motion (ROM) in patients with MPS followed at the reference center for lysosomal disorders at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil.
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living / classification. Adolescent. Brazil. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Glycosaminoglycans / metabolism. Humans. Infant. Male. Mobility Limitation. N-Acetylgalactosamine-4-Sulfatase / metabolism. N-Acetylgalactosamine-4-Sulfatase / therapeutic use. Recovery of Function. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 22543891.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-8894
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric rehabilitation medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pediatr Rehabil Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glycosaminoglycans; EC 3.1.6.12 / N-Acetylgalactosamine-4-Sulfatase
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60. ||........ 15%  Griffin SF, Reininger BM, Parra-Medina D, Evans AE, Sanderson M, Vincent ML: Development of multidimensional scales to measure key leaders' perceptions of community capacity and organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention. Fam Community Health; 2005 Oct-Dec;28(4):307-19
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Development of multidimensional scales to measure key leaders' perceptions of community capacity and organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention.
  • This study discusses the development of scales to measure key leaders' self-reported involvement in community capacity building, perceptions of organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention, and the relationship between capacity and teen pregnancy rates.
  • Findings indicate that key leaders' perceptions of organizational capacity are related to their involvement in community capacity building efforts and community capacity is associated with teen pregnancy rates.
  • This research represents progress toward measuring community and organizational capacity and may be used to inform future work focusing on developing quantitative measures of community capacity.
  • [MeSH-major] Community Health Services / statistics & numerical data. Consumer Participation / psychology. Pregnancy in Adolescence / prevention & control. Psychometrics / methods. Research Design
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Female. Humans. Leadership. Needs Assessment / statistics & numerical data. Pregnancy. Rural Population

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  • (PMID = 16166859.001).
  • [ISSN] 0160-6379
  • [Journal-full-title] Family & community health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fam Community Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. |......... 15%  Deschesnes M, Drouin N, Couturier Y: Schools' absorptive capacity to innovate in health promotion. J Health Organ Manag; 2013;27(1):24-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Schools' absorptive capacity to innovate in health promotion.
  • PURPOSE: A comprehensive "health promoting schools" (HPS) approach is advocated by the World Health Organization to foster the health of students.
  • To date, few studies have evaluated schools' capacity to implement it in an optimal way.
  • It has taken root in Zahra and George's model of organisation absorptive capacity (AC) for new knowledge but has been adapted to better explore AC in a school context.
  • ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The framework can serve as a conceptual guide to facilitate the absorption of innovation in schools and to design future empirical research to better understand the underlying process by which schools strengthen their capacities to become settings conducive to the health of youth.
  • [MeSH-major] Capacity Building / organization & administration. Health Promotion / organization & administration. School Health Services / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Humans. Models, Educational. Models, Organizational. Organizational Case Studies. Organizational Innovation. World Health Organization

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  • (PMID = 23734475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7266
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of health organization and management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Health Organ Manag
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / /GIR-89694
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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62. |......... 15%  Romero K, Reingold R: Advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the USA. Reprod Health Matters; 2013 May;21(41):186-95
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  • [Title] Advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the USA.
  • Many sexual and reproductive health care services, including gender reassignment treatment, facilitate reproductive autonomy and self-determination of gender identity.
  • This paper explores the issue of adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the United States (USA), focusing on the two countries' struggles to balance the rights of adolescents to make autonomous and confidential decisions with the rights of their parents.
  • Unfortunately, many countries, including Colombia and the USA, have been slow to develop jurisprudence and legislation that explicitly protect transgender adolescents' capacity to consent to gender assignment treatment.
  • Courts in Colombia, however, have developed jurisprudence that restricts parents' ability to make medical decisions on behalf of their infant intersex children, which lays a strong normative foundation for advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care.
  • It is a strategy that may prove effective in other countries in the Americas, even those with different frameworks for adolescent medical decision-making capacity, such as the USA.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Psychology. Decision Making. Patient Rights. Reproductive Health Services / legislation & jurisprudence. Transgendered Persons / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Colombia. Confidentiality. Humans. Personal Autonomy. United States

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23684201.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-9576
  • [Journal-full-title] Reproductive health matters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reprod Health Matters
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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63. |......... 15%  Sykes K: Aerobic capacity. Occup Health (Lond); 1992 Aug;44(8):231-3, 236
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Aerobic capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Reference Values

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  • (PMID = 1528550.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7917
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational health; a journal for occupational health nurses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Health (Lond)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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64. |......... 14%  Williams RJ, Kittinger DS, Ta VM, Nihoa WK, Payne C, Nigg CR: An assessment of community capacity to prevent adolescent alcohol consumption. Health Promot Pract; 2012 Sep;13(5):670-8
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  • [Title] An assessment of community capacity to prevent adolescent alcohol consumption.
  • To effectively address the issue of youth alcohol use, communities need to have sufficient infrastructure and capacity in place to operate effective prevention programs.
  • This study evaluates community capacity in the state of Hawai'i, using the Capacity Assessment Survey administered to stakeholders in the youth alcohol prevention system.
  • Capacity is quantified with gap scores, which measure the discrepancy between an agency's performance of an attribute and the attribute's relative importance.
  • Six assessment areas, termed capacity domains, are defined.
  • Based on these results, communities need to prioritize capacity-building efforts specifically in the domains of effectiveness, funding/resource availability, and sustainability.
  • Suggestions for improvement in each capacity domain are given.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcohol Drinking / prevention & control. Community-Based Participatory Research / organization & administration. Health Promotion / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cultural Competency. Hawaii. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Humans. Program Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 22467663.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-8399
  • [Journal-full-title] Health promotion practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Promot Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. |......... 14%  Rolleri LA, Wilson MM, Paluzzi PA, Sedivy VJ: Building capacity of state adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions to implement science-based approaches. Am J Community Psychol; 2008 Jun;41(3-4):225-34
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Building capacity of state adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions to implement science-based approaches.
  • A central question in adolescent reproductive health circles is how to effectively disseminate research to practitioners in a way that supports them in using the most scientifically sound and effective programming.
  • In 2002, the Division of Reproductive Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tackled this question by funding three national-level and five state-level organizations focused on adolescent pregnancy prevention to promote the use of science-based programs and approaches.
  • Healthy Teen Network (HTN) and Education, Training and Research Associates (ETR), two national organizations, have partnered under this CDC funding to implement an effective model for capacity building.
  • This paper provides an overview of the approaches used by HTN and ETR in capacity building using a seven-step process.
  • We describe how we modified the Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation (ISF) for science-based innovations to apply to capacity-building for adolescent reproductive health (ARH) programs, and how we developed relevant, sustainable training and technical support.
  • [MeSH-major] Community Networks / organization & administration. Evidence-Based Medicine. Pregnancy in Adolescence / prevention & control. Preventive Health Services / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Female. Humans. Male. Pregnancy. United States

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  • (PMID = 18293082.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-0562
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of community psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Community Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. |......... 14%  Iakovlev IuG, Ushakov AA, Negerev IA: [Medico-social aspects of the evaluation of physical work capacity of industrial workers]. Gig Tr Prof Zabol; 1990;(1):31-3
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  • [Title] [Medico-social aspects of the evaluation of physical work capacity of industrial workers].
  • It was established that in male workers with poor health, working capacity levels also decrease, what was assessed with express-techniques.
  • This facilitated the use of the working capacity level assessment as an integral index of individual and community health levels in mass medical examinations of both healthy and diseased people.
  • [MeSH-major] Engineering / standards. Health Status. Occupational Medicine / standards. Work Capacity Evaluation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Russia

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  • (PMID = 2139426.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-9919
  • [Journal-full-title] Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevaniia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gig Tr Prof Zabol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] USSR
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67. |......... 14%  Bobbitt-Cooke M, Cole TB: Critical factors in building local capacity to prevent and control injury: North Carolina's experience. J Public Health Manag Pract; 1997 Nov;3(6):35-42
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  • [Title] Critical factors in building local capacity to prevent and control injury: North Carolina's experience.
  • In fiscal years 1991-1992, a state injury control program awarded $258,000 to 33 local health departments for 50 community-based injury prevention projects.
  • To determine whether this program helped build the capacity of local health departments to prevent injury, project reports were reviewed and project directors were surveyed.
  • For four of six factors developed to assess capacity building, success was demonstrated for all local projects to some degree.
  • However, continued support is necessary to assure that the local health departments can sustain this capacity and continue to develop proficiency in data monitoring and evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Accident Prevention. Health Planning Support / economics. Health Promotion / methods. State Health Plans / economics. Wounds and Injuries / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Allied Health Personnel / education. Child. Health Planning. Humans. North Carolina. Protective Devices. United States

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  • (PMID = 10183182.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-4659
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of public health management and practice : JPHMP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Public Health Manag Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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68. |......... 14%  Phillips SM, Turner AP, Sanderson MF, Sproule J: Beverage carbohydrate concentration influences the intermittent endurance capacity of adolescent team games players during prolonged intermittent running. Eur J Appl Physiol; 2012 Mar;112(3):1107-16
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Beverage carbohydrate concentration influences the intermittent endurance capacity of adolescent team games players during prolonged intermittent running.
  • This study investigated the influence of consuming a 2, 6, and 10% carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) solution on the intermittent endurance capacity and sprint performance of adolescent team games players.
  • Intermittent endurance capacity increased by 34% with ingestion of the 6% CHO-E solution compared with the 10% solution (5.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.1 ± 1.5 min, P < 0.05), equating to a distance of 931 ± 172 versus 706 ± 272 m (P < 0.05).
  • These results suggest that the carbohydrate concentration of an ingested solution influences the intermittent endurance capacity of adolescent team games players with a 6% solution significantly more effective than a 10% solution.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Male. Osmolar Concentration. Periodicity. Soccer / physiology. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 21748368.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-6327
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of applied physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates
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69. |......... 14%  Kelen GD, McCarthy ML, Kraus CK, Ding R, Hsu EB, Li G, Shahan JB, Scheulen JJ, Green GB: Creation of surge capacity by early discharge of hospitalized patients at low risk for untoward events. Disaster Med Public Health Prep; 2009 Jun;3(2 Suppl):S10-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Creation of surge capacity by early discharge of hospitalized patients at low risk for untoward events.
  • OBJECTIVES: US hospitals are expected to function without external aid for up to 96 hours during a disaster; however, concern exists that there is insufficient capacity in hospitals to absorb large numbers of acute casualties.
  • The aim of the study was to determine the potential for creation of inpatient bed surge capacity from the early discharge (reverse triage) of hospital inpatients at low risk of untoward events for up to 96 hours.
  • METHODS: In a health system with 3 capacity-constrained hospitals that are representative of US facilities (academic, teaching affiliate, community), a variety (N = 50) of inpatient units were prospectively canvassed in rotation using a blocked randomized design for 19 weeks ending in February 2006.
  • Accounting for additional routine patient discharges, full use of staffed and unstaffed licensed beds, gross surge capacity was estimated at 77%, 95%, and 103% for the 3 hospitals.
  • Factoring likely continuance of nonvictim emergency admissions, net surge capacity available for disaster victims was estimated at 66%, 71%, and 81%, respectively.
  • Most realized capacity was available within 24 to 48 hours.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Hospital surge capacity for standard inpatient beds may be greater than previously believed.
  • Reverse triage, if appropriately harnessed, can be a major contributor to surge capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Length of Stay / statistics & numerical data. Male. Maryland. Middle Aged. Multi-Institutional Systems. Prospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19349868.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-744X
  • [Journal-full-title] Disaster medicine and public health preparedness
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Disaster Med Public Health Prep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. |......... 14%  Moriya J, Sugiura Y: High visual working memory capacity in trait social anxiety. PLoS One; 2012;7(4):e34244
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  • [Title] High visual working memory capacity in trait social anxiety.
  • Working memory capacity is one of the most important cognitive functions influencing individual traits, such as attentional control, fluid intelligence, and also psychopathological traits.
  • Previous research suggests that anxiety is associated with impaired cognitive function, and studies have shown low verbal working memory capacity in individuals with high trait anxiety.
  • However, the relationship between trait anxiety and visual working memory capacity is still unclear.
  • Considering that people allocate visual attention more widely to detect danger under threat, visual working memory capacity might be higher in anxious people.
  • In the present study, we show that visual working memory capacity increases as trait social anxiety increases by using a change detection task.
  • When the demand to inhibit distractors increased, however, high visual working memory capacity diminished in individuals with social anxiety, and instead, impaired filtering of distractors was predicted by trait social anxiety.
  • State anxiety was not correlated with visual working memory capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Neuropsychological Tests. Reaction Time. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 22496783.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3322141
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71. |......... 14%  Sukharev AG, Sergeta IV: [The characteristics of their free time and the physical work capacity of adolescents]. Gig Sanit; 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):29-31
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  • [Title] [The characteristics of their free time and the physical work capacity of adolescents].
  • Discusses the problems in the search for the simplest and most effective methods for improving the performance capacity of adolescents.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological. Adolescent. Circadian Rhythm. Ergometry. Female. Health Status. Humans. Male. Task Performance and Analysis

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  • (PMID = 8666303.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-9900
  • [Journal-full-title] Gigiena i sanitariia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gig Sanit
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] RUSSIA
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72. |......... 14%  Meester-Delver A, Beelen A, van Eck M, Voorman J, Dallmeijer A, Nollet F, Becher J: Construct validity of the Capacity Profile in adolescents with cerebral palsy. Clin Rehabil; 2010 Mar;24(3):258-66
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  • [Title] Construct validity of the Capacity Profile in adolescents with cerebral palsy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To establish construct validity of the Capacity Profile, a method to comprehensively classify additional care needs in five domains of body functions (physical health, motor, sensory, mental, voice and speech functions), in adolescents with non-progressive, permanent conditions such as cerebral palsy.
  • METHODS: Associations were calculated between Capacity Profile domains and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (communication, daily activities, social and motor skills) and Gross Motor Function Classification System using Spearman's rho.
  • Furthermore, we explored the independent contribution of the Capacity Profile domains to activities and participation measured with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales.
  • RESULTS: All Capacity Profile domains were significantly associated with all domains of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and the Gross Motor Function Classification System (P<0.05).
  • Multiple regression analysis showed that the Capacity Profile contributed 87% to variance in communication (Capacity Profile-voice 78%, mental 8% and physical 1%), 85% to daily activities (Capacity Profile-mental 75%, motor 8% and voice 2%), 60% to social skills (Capacity Profile-voice 56% and mental 4%), and 91% to motor skills (Capacity Profile-motor 87%, mental 3% and sensory 1%).
  • CONCLUSION: These findings support the construct validity of the Capacity Profile in adolescents with cerebral palsy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living. Adaptation, Psychological. Adolescent. Child. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Motor Skills. Needs Assessment. Regression Analysis. Reproducibility of Results. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 20103569.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-0873
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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73. |......... 14%  Savage RJ, Best SA, Carstairs GL, Ham DJ: The relationship between maximal lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift in strength-based soldiering tasks. J Strength Cond Res; 2012 Jul;26 Suppl 2:S23-9
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  • [Title] The relationship between maximal lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift in strength-based soldiering tasks.
  • However, in military settings, in which task demand is set and capable workers must be selected, subjective measurements are inadequate, and maximal capacity testing must be used to assess lifting capability.
  • The aim of this study was to establish and compare the relationship between maximal lifting capacity and a self-determined tolerable lifting limit, maximum acceptable lift, across a range of military-relevant lifting tasks.
  • Seventy male soldiers (age 23.7 ± 6.1 years) from the Australian Army performed 7 strength-based lifting tasks to determine their maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift.
  • Comparisons were performed to identify maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity for each individual task.
  • No differences were found in maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity across all tasks (p = 0.46).
  • When data were pooled, maximum acceptable lift was equal to 84 ± 8% of the maximum lifting capacity.
  • This study is the first to illustrate the strong and consistent relationship between maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift for multiple single lifting tasks.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Australia. Humans. Male. Muscle, Skeletal / physiology. Task Performance and Analysis. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 22643137.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4287
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Strength Cond Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. |......... 14%  Moser DJ, Schultz SK, Arndt S, Benjamin ML, Fleming FW, Brems CS, Paulsen JS, Appelbaum PS, Andreasen NC: Capacity to provide informed consent for participation in schizophrenia and HIV research. Am J Psychiatry; 2002 Jul;159(7):1201-7
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  • [Title] Capacity to provide informed consent for participation in schizophrenia and HIV research.
  • This study was designed to examine the capacity of subjects with schizophrenia and subjects with HIV to provide informed consent for research participation and to determine the relationships among cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms, and decisional capacity.
  • RESULTS: Eighty percent of the subjects with schizophrenia and 96% of the HIV-positive subjects demonstrated adequate capacity to consent to the hypothetical drug trial, but subjects in the schizophrenia group had significantly lower scores on two of the four aspects of decisional capacity.
  • For the subjects with schizophrenia, neuropsychological functioning and psychiatric symptoms (e.g., apathy and avolition), but not psychotic symptoms (e.g., hallucinations and delusions), were significantly associated with decisional capacity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The majority of subjects who are recruited and willing to participate in schizophrenia or HIV research will have adequate capacity to provide consent.
  • Cognitive dysfunction and the symptoms shown to be associated with impaired decisional capacity are not unique to schizophrenia and may occur with many other forms of illness.
  • These findings underscore the importance of considering how decisional capacity will be assessed in all types of research, regardless of the specific condition being studied.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Decision Making. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neuropsychological Tests / statistics & numerical data. Psychiatric Status Rating Scales / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 12091200.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-953X
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 107474
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Biomedical and Behavioral Research / Empirical Approach
  • [General-notes] KIE/ 24 refs.; KIE/ KIE Bib: AIDS/human experimentation; human experimentation/informed consent; human experimentation/special populations
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75. |......... 14%  Sautkin MF, Stuneeva GI, Kiriushin VA: [Age-related changes in lungs' vital capacity in Ryazan schoolchildren]. Gig Sanit; 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):61-3
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  • [Title] [Age-related changes in lungs' vital capacity in Ryazan schoolchildren].
  • The vital capacity in the 11- and 14-year old boys and 11- and 13-year old girls examined in 1996 to 1999 significantly reduced as compared in the children of the same age.
  • The significant increase in the vital capacity in 15-16-old girls examined in 1996-1999 is due to that in their height, as compared with these indices in those examined in 1976 (by 4.64 and 4.87, respectively).
  • [MeSH-major] Aging / physiology. Lung / physiology. Students. Vital Capacity / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Factors. Catchment Area (Health). Child. Female. Humans. Male. Russia

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  • (PMID = 16758825.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-9900
  • [Journal-full-title] Gigiena i sanitariia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gig Sanit
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
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76. |......... 14%  Haas JD, Murdoch S, Rivera J, Martorell R: Early nutrition and later physical work capacity. Nutr Rev; 1996 Feb;54(2 Pt 2):S41-8
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  • [Title] Early nutrition and later physical work capacity.
  • Several important studies within the past 20 years have examined the impact of acute nutrient deficiencies upon physical work capacity.
  • Spurr et al. and Satyanarayana et al. extended that line of research to explore the apparent effects of chronic or lifelong undernutrition upon the work capacity of adolescent males.
  • The studies of physical work capacity, together with other measures such as cognitive functioning and reproductive performance, provide strong evidence in support of policies and programs designed to eliminate the causes of environmental stunting in poor populations.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child, Preschool. Colombia. Female. Guatemala. Humans. India. Infant. Male. Oxygen Consumption

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  • (PMID = 8710235.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-6643
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01-HD22440; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / T32-HD07331
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 22
  • [Other-IDs] PIP/ 117344; POP/ 00258649
  • [Keywords] PIP ; Adolescents (major topic) / Child Nutrition (major topic) / Growth (major topic) / Infant (major topic) / Infant Nutrition (major topic) / Literature Review (major topic) / Longterm Effects (major topic) / Muscular Effects (major topic) / Pulmonary Effects (major topic) / Skeletal Effects (major topic) / Africa / Africa South Of The Sahara / Age Factors / Americas / Asia / Biology / Central America / Child Development / Colombia / Demographic Factors / Developing Countries / Eastern Africa / English Speaking Africa / Guatemala / Health / India / Latin America / North America / Nutrition / Physiology / Population / Population Characteristics / Population Dynamics / South America / Southern Asia / Tanzania / Time Factors / Youth
  • [General-notes] PIP/ TJ: NUTRITION REVIEWS.
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77. |......... 14%  Stroup S, Appelbaum P, Swartz M, Patel M, Davis S, Jeste D, Kim S, Keefe R, Manschreck T, McEvoy J, Lieberman J: Decision-making capacity for research participation among individuals in the CATIE schizophrenia trial. Schizophr Res; 2005 Dec 1;80(1):1-8
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  • [Title] Decision-making capacity for research participation among individuals in the CATIE schizophrenia trial.
  • OBJECTIVE: Uncertainty regarding the degree to which persons with schizophrenia may lack decision-making capacity, and what the predictors of capacity may be led us to examine the relationship between psychopathology, neurocognitive functioning, and decision-making capacity in a large sample of persons with schizophrenia at entry into a clinical trial.
  • METHOD: In the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia trial, a clinical trial sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health designed to compare the effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs, subjects were administered the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR) and had to demonstrate adequate decision-making capacity before randomization.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Negative symptoms and aspects of neurocognitive functioning were correlated with decision-making capacity in this large sample of moderately ill subjects with schizophrenia.
  • In multiple regression models predicting performance on the MacCAT-CR scales, working memory was the only consistent predictor of the components of decision-making capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neuropsychological Tests. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 16182516.001).
  • [ISSN] 0920-9964
  • [Journal-full-title] Schizophrenia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Schizophr. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / K23 MH67002-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents
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78. |......... 14%  Appelbaum PS, Redlich A: Impact of decisional capacity on the use of leverage to encourage treatment adherence. Community Ment Health J; 2006 Apr;42(2):121-30
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  • [Title] Impact of decisional capacity on the use of leverage to encourage treatment adherence.
  • As part of a multi-site study of leverage in community treatment, 120 subjects at two sites reported on their leverage experiences and completed a decisional capacity assessment with the MacCAT-T.
  • No strong or consistent associations were found between capacity and use of leverage, raising questions about the basis on which decisions to employ leverage are being made.
  • [MeSH-major] Bipolar Disorder / drug therapy. Community Mental Health Services. Decision Making. Depressive Disorder, Major / drug therapy. Mental Competency. Patient Compliance / psychology. Schizophrenia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antidepressive Agents / therapeutic use. Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Interview, Psychological. Male. Massachusetts. Middle Aged. North Carolina. Psychometrics. Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16432633.001).
  • [ISSN] 0010-3853
  • [Journal-full-title] Community mental health journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Community Ment Health J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidepressive Agents; 0 / Antipsychotic Agents; 0 / Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
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79. |......... 14%  Birkel DA, Edgren L: Hatha yoga: improved vital capacity of college students. Altern Ther Health Med; 2000 Nov;6(6):55-63
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  • [Title] Hatha yoga: improved vital capacity of college students.
  • CONTEXT: The vital capacity of the lungs is a critical component of good health.
  • Vital capacity is an important concern for those with asthma, heart conditions, and lung ailments; those who smoke; and those who have no known lung problems.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of yoga postures and breathing exercises on vital capacity.
  • DESIGN: Using the Spiropet spirometer, researchers measured vital capacity.
  • Vital capacity determinants were taken near the beginning and end of two 17-week semesters.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Vital capacity over time for smokers, asthmatics, and those with no known lung disease.
  • RESULTS: The study showed a statistically significant (P < .001) improvement in vital capacity across all categories over time.
  • These findings are consistent with other research studies reporting the positive effect of yoga on the vital capacity of the lungs.
  • [MeSH-major] Breathing Exercises. Vital Capacity. Yoga
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Spirometry

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  • (PMID = 11076447.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-6791
  • [Journal-full-title] Alternative therapies in health and medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Altern Ther Health Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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80. |......... 14%  Reid MJ, Saito S, Fayorsey R, Carter RJ, Abrams EJ: Assessing capacity for diagnosing tuberculosis in children in sub-Saharan African HIV care settings. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis; 2012 Jul;16(7):924-7
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  • [Title] Assessing capacity for diagnosing tuberculosis in children in sub-Saharan African HIV care settings.
  • We assessed the availability of pediatric TB diagnostic tests at 651 pediatric human immunodeficiency virus care and treatment sites across nine African countries: 54% of the sites had access to sputum culture capacity and 51% to chest X-ray services.
  • While 87% of sites had access to smear microscopy, only 6% had the capacity to perform sputum induction and 5% to perform gastric aspirate.
  • Capacity-building initiatives to improve sputum collection in children are urgently required.
  • [MeSH-major] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / diagnosis. Health Resources / statistics & numerical data. Mycobacterium tuberculosis / isolation & purification. Sputum / microbiology. Tuberculosis / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Africa South of the Sahara. Child. Child, Preschool. Diagnostic Tests, Routine. HIV. HIV Infections / complications. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Pediatrics. Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 22583761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1815-7920
  • [Journal-full-title] The international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Tuberc. Lung Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PEPFAR / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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81. |......... 14%  Steiner M, Brown E, Trzepacz P, Dillon J, Berger C, Carter D, Reid R, Stewart D: Fluoxetine improves functional work capacity in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Arch Womens Ment Health; 2003 Feb;6(1):71-7
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  • [Title] Fluoxetine improves functional work capacity in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.
  • We conducted a post hoc analysis of the results of a previously reported study evaluating the efficacy of fluoxetine in the management of PMDD, to determine the extent to which women with PMDD perceived impairment in their functional work capacity during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle.
  • The effects of two doses of fluoxetine vs placebo in alleviating PMDD symptoms and restoring normal work capacity during this period were assessed.
  • We measured baseline follicular vs luteal phase presence of 8 patient-rated functional work capacity-related symptoms on the Premenstrual Tension Scale-Self Rated in 320 women who met diagnostic criteria for late luteal phase dysphoric disorder, now known as PMDD.
  • All 8 work capacity-related symptoms were more likely to be present in the baseline luteal phase than in the baseline follicular phase.
  • A statistically significant improvement from baseline to the average treatment score for the work capacity subscale was detected for both fluoxetine groups compared to the placebo group.
  • Our results demonstrate that fluoxetine at a relatively low dose of 20 mg/d quickly reduced symptoms that negatively affect work capacity and was well tolerated.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Double-Blind Method. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Questionnaires. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 12715267.001).
  • [ISSN] 1434-1816
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of women's mental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Womens Ment Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors; 01K63SUP8D / Fluoxetine
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82. |......... 14%  Renlund DG, Taylor DO, Ensley RD, O'Connell JB, Gilbert EM, Bristow MR, Ma H, Yanowitz FG: Exercise capacity after heart transplantation: influence of donor and recipient characteristics. J Heart Lung Transplant; 1996 Jan;15(1 Pt 1):16-24
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  • [Title] Exercise capacity after heart transplantation: influence of donor and recipient characteristics.
  • BACKGROUND: For incompletely understood reasons, cardiac transplant recipients achieve only 60% to 70% of predicted values for maximal exercise capacity.
  • The objective was to determine the characteristics of cardiac transplant recipients that are predictive of exercise capacity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Female recipients and older recipients have a lower absolute exercise capacity, but achieve a greater proportion of their predicted capacity.
  • Recipients of older donor hearts and those receiving chronic corticosteroids have decreased exercise capacity.
  • Pulmonary vascular resistance is inversely correlated with exercise capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aging / physiology. Child. Exercise Test / methods. Exercise Test / statistics & numerical data. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hemodynamics. Humans. Immunosuppression. Male. Middle Aged. Regression Analysis. Sex Characteristics. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 8820079.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-2498
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of heart and lung transplantation : the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Heart Lung Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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83. |......... 14%  Vandevoorde J, Verbanck S, Schuermans D, Broekaert L, Devroey D, Kartounian J, Vincken W: Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in six seconds as predictors of reduced total lung capacity. Eur Respir J; 2008 Feb;31(2):391-5
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  • [Title] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in six seconds as predictors of reduced total lung capacity.
  • The present study aims to derive guidelines that identify patients for whom spirometry can reliably predict a reduced total lung capacity (TLC).
  • Reference equations from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III were used for forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in six seconds (FEV(6)).
  • In obstructive patients, spirometry cannot reliably diagnose a concomitant restrictive defect, but it can rule out restriction for patients with forced vital capacity or forced expiratory volume in six seconds >85% pred (males) or >70% pred (females).
  • [MeSH-major] Forced Expiratory Volume / physiology. Total Lung Capacity. Vital Capacity / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Algorithms. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Mass Screening / methods. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Retrospective Studies. Sensitivity and Specificity. Spirometry. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17928313.001).
  • [ISSN] 1399-3003
  • [Journal-full-title] The European respiratory journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Respir. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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84. |......... 14%  Carlsson M, Carlsson T, Hammarström D, Malm C, Tonkonogi M: Time trials predict the competitive performance capacity of junior cross-country skiers. Int J Sports Physiol Perform; 2014 Jan;9(1):12-8
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  • [Title] Time trials predict the competitive performance capacity of junior cross-country skiers.
  • PURPOSE: This study investigated whether there is a correlation between time-trial performance and competitive performance capacity of male and female junior cross-country skiers and sought to explain sex-specific competitive performance capacity through multiple-regression modeling.
  • The models developed for FISdist and FISsprint explained 73.9-82.3% of the variance in the performance capacity of male junior cross-country skiers.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Running and roller-skiing time trials are useful tests for accurately predicting the performance capacity of junior cross-country skiers.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Female. Humans. Male. Regression Analysis. Running / physiology. Sex Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 23038700.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-0265
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of sports physiology and performance
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Sports Physiol Perform
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. |......... 14%  Brauer BM: [Simple examinations of the physical working capacity in childhood and youth (author's transl)]. Arztl Jugendkd; 1981;72(2):94-9
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  • [Title] [Simple examinations of the physical working capacity in childhood and youth (author's transl)].
  • Evaluation of the physical working capacity in childhood and youth is an important problem in pediatrics.
  • The capacity of the cardio-vascular system proves the parameter of endurance training, which has a close correlation to the level of health.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Factors. Child. Female. Hemodynamics. Humans. Male. Sex Factors

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  • (PMID = 7270316.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-9518
  • [Journal-full-title] Ärztliche Jugendkunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arztl Jugendkd
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY, EAST
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86. |......... 14%  Bernardes SF, Lima ML: Age differences in control beliefs regarding health: control, strategy and capacity. Br J Health Psychol; 2006 Sep;11(Pt 3):357-71
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  • [Title] Age differences in control beliefs regarding health: control, strategy and capacity.
  • OBJECTIVES: A new model of perceived control has been proposed (Skinner, 1995) in which 3 types of control-related beliefs were distinguished: control, strategy and capacity.
  • This model has not yet been applied to health issues.
  • Hence, the main purpose of this study was to apply it to the health domain, exploring age differences in the way children and teenagers conceptualize control-related beliefs.
  • Generally, children showed stronger capacity beliefs and a higher perceived control over their own health than teenagers.
  • Moreover, they contribute to the development of more effective and reliable health-related school-based prevention/intervention programmes aiming at these particular age cohorts.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude to Health. Cognition. Culture. Social Control, Informal
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Affect. Age Factors. Child. Factor Analysis, Statistical. Female. Humans. Male. Pilot Projects. Prospective Studies. Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 16870049.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-107X
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of health psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Health Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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87. |......... 14%  Schaar B, Feldkötter M, Nonn JM, Hoppe B: Cardiorespiratory capacity in children and adolescents on maintenance haemodialysis. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2011 Nov;26(11):3701-8
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  • [Title] Cardiorespiratory capacity in children and adolescents on maintenance haemodialysis.
  • Their physical endurance capacity is known to be significantly lower than that of healthy controls.
  • We were interested in the effect of HD on the cardiorespiratory capacity of children and adolescents on maintenance HD.
  • METHODS: We therefore examined the endurance capacity by cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a cycle ergospirometer, before and after HD in 14 patients (9 male, 5 female; mean age: 15.1 ± 3.0 years; mean period on HD: 16.3 ± 11.5 months).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Paediatric patients on maintenance HD in general have a significantly lower exercise capacity compared to a healthy age-matched population, which is expressed much more after dialysis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Heart Rate. Humans. Male. Oxygen Consumption. Prognosis. Young Adult


88. |......... 14%  Ryan S: The predictive capacity of declared musculoskeletal disorder at pre-employment screening. Occup Med (Lond); 2010 Aug;60(5):354-7
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  • [Title] The predictive capacity of declared musculoskeletal disorder at pre-employment screening.
  • BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken at a major UK airport in response to management concerns about levels of sickness absence and impaired work capacity in the security department in order to investigate the possibility of achieving reductions through changes in pre-employment screening procedures.
  • AIMS: To determine the predictive capacity of a declared musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) at pre-employment screening.
  • METHODS: This study was based on the pre-employment health declarations of security workers.
  • Work outcomes measured included sickness absence rates (including total and MSD-related absence), work restriction and ill-health retirement rates.
  • Those who declared an MSD were compared with those who did not using data from the human resources department and the occupational health records.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pre-employment health screening can predict subsequent work outcomes.
  • It is suggested that greater scrutiny is applied to declarations of an MSD at pre-employment screening in the potentially adverse manual handling environment of airport security work and that more advice is given to management about future risks of sickness absence and impaired work capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Early Diagnosis. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Occupational Health. Questionnaires / standards. Self Disclosure. Sick Leave / statistics & numerical data. Work Capacity Evaluation. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20097743.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-8405
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational medicine (Oxford, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Med (Lond)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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89. |......... 14%  Buys R, Budts W, Delecluse C, Vanhees L: Exercise capacity, physical activity, and obesity in adults with repaired aortic coarctation. J Cardiovasc Nurs; 2013 Jan-Feb;28(1):66-73
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  • [Title] Exercise capacity, physical activity, and obesity in adults with repaired aortic coarctation.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with aortic coarctation (COA) have a reduced exercise capacity and seem to be more prone to adopt a sedentary lifestyle.
  • OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe weight status, self-reported physical activity levels, and self-perceived health status in adults with repaired COA in comparison with healthy counterparts and to investigate the relationships among exercise capacity, physical activity, weight status, and perceived health status.
  • METHODS: We studied 103 COA patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and who completed the Flemish Physical Activity Computerized Questionnaire and the short-form 36 health survey questionnaire.
  • Patients with COA report a lower level of habitual physical activity (P < .05) as well as reductions in perceived vitality, general health, and mental health (P < .05).
  • Parameters of habitual physical activity are related to exercise capacity (total energy expenditure: r = 0.278, P = .0015).
  • The more active COA patients report higher scores of perceived physical functioning, general health, and mental health.
  • As a poor exercise capacity identifies patients at risk for hospitalization and death and obesity might adversely influence the development of cardiovascular disease, it is important to improve the exercise capacity in these patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Health Status. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Self Report. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 22210143.001).
  • [ISSN] 1550-5049
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of cardiovascular nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cardiovasc Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. |......... 14%  Kavanagh DA, Svehla G: Variation of salivary calcium, phosphate and buffering capacity in adolescents. Arch Oral Biol; 1998 Dec;43(12):1023-7
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  • [Title] Variation of salivary calcium, phosphate and buffering capacity in adolescents.
  • Calcium, phosphate and buffering capacity were measured in children's (n=43) unstimulated saliva between September 1990 and June 1991 inclusive.
  • Buffering capacity was assessed immediately after sample collection using the Dentobuff strip method.
  • The intra-individual variation of buffering capacity over time was statistically significant (Friedman two-way ANOVA, p < 0.001).
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Analysis of Variance. Buffers. Child. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Reagent Strips. Seasons. Secretory Rate. Spectrophotometry

  • HSDB. structure - CALCIUM, ELEMENTAL.
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  • (PMID = 9877333.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-9969
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of oral biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Oral Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Buffers; 0 / Phosphates; 0 / Reagent Strips; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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91. |......... 13%  Barkai L, Peja M, Vámosi I: Physical work capacity in diabetic children and adolescents with and without cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Diabet Med; 1996 Mar;13(3):254-8
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  • [Title] Physical work capacity in diabetic children and adolescents with and without cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction.
  • The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction on work capacity in children and adolescents with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes.
  • Physical work capacity at heart rate of 170 min-1 was determined by bicycle ergometry.
  • Patients with autonomic dysfunction had significantly lower physical work capacity at heart rate of 170 min-1 than those with normal autonomic function or non-diabetic subjects (0.81 +/- 0.12 vs 1.49 +/- 0.16 and 1.54 +/- 0.20 W kg-1 p = 0.01).
  • Physical work capacity at heart rate of 170 min-1 was related to glycated haemoglobin level (r = -0.55, p = 0.01), to resting heart rate (r = 0.57, p = 0.01), and to deep breathing heart rate variation (r = 0.51, p = 0.02).
  • In conclusion, impaired work capacity is associated with poor blood glucose control and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Confidence Intervals. Electrocardiography. Exercise Test. Female. Humans. Male. Posture. Reference Values. Respiration

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  • (PMID = 8689847.001).
  • [ISSN] 0742-3071
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabet. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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92. |......... 13%  Pizzagalli DA, Bogdan R, Ratner KG, Jahn AL: Increased perceived stress is associated with blunted hedonic capacity: potential implications for depression research. Behav Res Ther; 2007 Nov;45(11):2742-53
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  • [Title] Increased perceived stress is associated with blunted hedonic capacity: potential implications for depression research.
  • Preclinical studies suggest that stress exerts depressogenic effects by impairing hedonic capacity; in humans, however, the precise mechanisms linking stress and depression are largely unknown.
  • As an initial step towards better understanding the association between stress and anhedonia, the present study tested, in two independent samples, whether individuals reporting elevated stress exhibit decreased hedonic capacity.
  • Hedonic capacity was objectively assessed using a signal-detection task based on a differential reinforcement schedule.
  • Decreased reward responsiveness (i.e., the participants' propensity to modulate behavior as a function of reward) was used as an operational measure of hedonic capacity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Psychological. Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Internal-External Control. Male. Psychiatric Status Rating Scales. Psychometrics. Reward

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  • (PMID = 17854766.001).
  • [ISSN] 0005-7967
  • [Journal-full-title] Behaviour research and therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Behav Res Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH068376-04; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01MH68376
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] E78ZFF4KQ0 / Reward
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS33075; NLM/ PMC2080833
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93. |......... 13%  Kelleher K: Organizational capacity to deliver effective treatments for children and adolescents. Adm Policy Ment Health; 2010 Mar;37(1-2):89-94
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  • [Title] Organizational capacity to deliver effective treatments for children and adolescents.
  • Treatment and services research in the general medical sector has emphasized the importance of addressing organizational capacity to improve interventions for patients with chronic conditions.
  • Efficacious interventions for child and adolescent mental disorders without substantial enhancements in mental health organizational capacity will not result in improvements for children.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Health Services / organization & administration. Child Health Services / organization & administration. Community Mental Health Services / organization & administration. Health Services Research / organization & administration. Mental Disorders / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Contract Services / organization & administration. Delivery of Health Care / organization & administration. Electronic Health Records / organization & administration. Health Care Reform / organization & administration. Humans. Treatment Outcome. United States

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  • (PMID = 20180149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3289
  • [Journal-full-title] Administration and policy in mental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adm Policy Ment Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA018943-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS195358; NLM/ PMC2874606
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94. |......... 13%  Freire M, Neto MS, Garcia EB, Quaresma MR, Ferreira LM: Functional capacity and postural pain outcomes after reduction mammaplasty. Plast Reconstr Surg; 2007 Apr 1;119(4):1149-56; discussion 1157-8
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  • [Title] Functional capacity and postural pain outcomes after reduction mammaplasty.
  • BACKGROUND: Neck, shoulder, and lower back pain and reduction of functional capacity can be caused by breast hypertrophy.
  • The authors' objective was to evaluate the impact of reduction mammaplasty on pain and functional capacity of patients with mammary hypertrophy.
  • All patients were interviewed for clinical and demographic data and evaluated to measure pain and functional capacity.
  • The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ-20), Brazilian validated version (0 = best, 3 = worst), was applied to assess functional capacity.
  • Pain and functional capacity were measured at baseline and 6 months after surgery.
  • Functional capacity in group A was improved 6 months after reduction mammaplasty, compared with group B (control), in the following aspects: getting dressed, getting up, walking, maintaining personal hygiene, reaching, and grasping objects.
  • CONCLUSION: Reduction mammaplasty improved functional capacity and relieved pain in the lower back, shoulders, and neck of patients with mammary hypertrophy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Back Pain / etiology. Back Pain / physiopathology. Case-Control Studies. Chi-Square Distribution. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hypertrophy / surgery. Linear Models. Middle Aged. Neck Pain / etiology. Neck Pain / physiopathology. Pain Measurement. Patient Satisfaction. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome


95. |......... 13%  Lochte L, Angermann M, Larsson B: Cardiorespiratory fitness of asthmatic children and validation of predicted aerobic capacity. Clin Respir J; 2009 Jan;3(1):42-50
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  • [Title] Cardiorespiratory fitness of asthmatic children and validation of predicted aerobic capacity.
  • INTRODUCTION: Predicted aerobic capacity (PAC) was estimated by submaximal exercise test and compared with monitored aerobic capacity (MAC) measured by laboratory conditions [maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2peak))] in 18 children and adolescents, 10 asthmatics and 8 matched controls.
  • Objectives: To compare aerobic capacity between asthmatic children and controls, to estimate the agreement between PAC and MAC and observe for trend of PAC.
  • Physical activity level and subjective health showed no differences between groups, or level and categories, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: The asthmatic participants presented with lower aerobic capacity than controls in both PAC and MAC; therefore, results confirmed the validity of the PAC method.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anthropometry. Body Mass Index. Child. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Forced Expiratory Volume. Heart Rate. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Physical Fitness / physiology. Predictive Value of Tests. Probability. Prospective Studies. Reference Values. Respiratory Function Tests. Severity of Illness Index. Statistics, Nonparametric. Total Lung Capacity. Vital Capacity

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  • [ErratumIn] Clin Respir J. 2009 Jan;3(1):63
  • (PMID = 20298371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1752-699X
  • [Journal-full-title] The clinical respiratory journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Respir J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
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96. |......... 13%  Ebersole JL, Schuster JL, Stevens J, Dawson D 3rd, Kryscio RJ, Lin Y, Thomas MV, Miller CS: Patterns of salivary analytes provide diagnostic capacity for distinguishing chronic adult periodontitis from health. J Clin Immunol; 2013 Jan;33(1):271-9
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  • [Title] Patterns of salivary analytes provide diagnostic capacity for distinguishing chronic adult periodontitis from health.
  • Salivary biomarker discovery requires identification of analytes with high discriminatory capacity to distinguish disease from health, including day-to-day variations that occur in analyte levels.
  • ROC analyses of IL-1β, IL-6 and MMP-8 yielded areas under the curves of 0.963-0.984 for discriminating periodontitis from health.
  • [MeSH-major] Periodontitis / diagnosis. Quality Assurance, Health Care / standards. Saliva / chemistry. Saliva / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Albumins / analysis. Biological Markers / analysis. Chronic Disease. Dinoprostone / analysis. Female. Humans. Interferon-alpha / analysis. Interleukin-1beta / analysis. Interleukin-6 / analysis. Male. Matrix Metalloproteinase 8 / analysis. Middle Aged. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / analysis. Young Adult

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  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
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  • (PMID = 22926406.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-2592
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / P20 GM103538; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P20 RR020145; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P20 RR020145; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / U01 DE017793
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Albumins; 0 / Biological Markers; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-1beta; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; EC 3.4.24.34 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 8; K7Q1JQR04M / Dinoprostone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS406280; NLM/ PMC3788639
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97. |......... 13%  Rishiraj N, Taunton JE, Niven B, Lloyd-Smith R, Regan W, Woollard R: Performance of healthy braced participants during aerobic and anaerobic capacity tasks. J Athl Train; 2011 Jul-Aug;46(4):395-402
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Performance of healthy braced participants during aerobic and anaerobic capacity tasks.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cross-Over Studies. Humans. Knee. Knee Injuries / prevention & control. Male. Random Allocation. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21944071.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-162X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of athletic training
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Athl Train
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3419151
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98. |......... 13%  Bobkov IuG, Epishkin AK: [Effect of actoprotectors on the work capacity of operators during modeling of various factors of space flight]. Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med; 1988 Sep-Oct;22(5):20-3
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  • [Title] [Effect of actoprotectors on the work capacity of operators during modeling of various factors of space flight].
  • This paper presents experimental findings indicating that bemithyl, an actoprotective agent, has a beneficial effect on the health status and work capacity of operators during simulated space flight and 56-hour continuous work.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Physiological / drug effects. Aerospace Medicine. Benzimidazoles / pharmacology. Models, Biological. Space Flight. Work Capacity Evaluation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Clinical Trials as Topic. Coriolis Force. Double-Blind Method. Hemodynamics / drug effects. Humans. Male. Placebos. Weightlessness

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  • (PMID = 3066983.001).
  • [ISSN] 0321-5040
  • [Journal-full-title] Kosmicheskaia biologiia i aviakosmicheskaia meditsina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] USSR
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Placebos; 63513-71-3 / bemethyl
  • [Other-IDs] NASA/ 89142380
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99. |......... 13%  Bugajska J, Makowiec-Dąbrowska T, Bortkiewicz A, Gadzicka E, Marszałek A, Lewandowski Z, Konarska M: Physical capacity of occupationally active population and capability to perform physical work. Int J Occup Saf Ergon; 2011;17(2):129-38
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  • [Title] Physical capacity of occupationally active population and capability to perform physical work.
  • The aim of this study was to determine what proportion of occupationally active Poles have working capacity that enables them to tolerate hard and very hard physical work.
  • For this purpose physical capacity of 1188 occupationally active subjects (524 women and 664 men), aged 18-64 years was examined.
  • [MeSH-major] Occupational Health. Oxygen Consumption / physiology. Physical Exertion / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Poland. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21679664.001).
  • [ISSN] 1080-3548
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of occupational safety and ergonomics : JOSE
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Occup Saf Ergon
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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100. |......... 13%  Awadallah S, Al Arrayed K, Bahareth E, Saeed Z: Total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin in beta thalassemia. Clin Lab; 2013;59(5-6):687-91
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  • [Title] Total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin in beta thalassemia.
  • BACKGROUND: Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and ischemia modified albumin (IMA) are common parameters used to assess the status of oxidative stress under different conditions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the presence of a significant inverse correlation between total antioxidant capacity and IMA; this further argues for the inclusion of IMA as one of the oxidative stress markers in thalassemic patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Analysis of Variance. Biological Markers / blood. Cohort Studies. Female. Ferritins / blood. Humans. Male. Serum Albumin. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 23865371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-6510
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical laboratory
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Lab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Biological Markers; 0 / Serum Albumin; 0 / ischemia-modified albumin; 9007-73-2 / Ferritins
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